Pages

Saturday, July 20, 2013

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun–20 July 2013

Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings, has a wonder fun activity on Saturday called Saturday Night Genealogy Fun. This week his mission for us is:
1)   Make a map using the National Atlas map at (http://nationalatlas.gov/streamer/Streamer/streamer.html) showing the downstream course of a river that one of your ancestors may have traveled on.  What does it tell you?  What did you learn?  Did they live at other places on that river, or downstream of that river? 
2)   Tell us about it in a blog post of your own (please show us the map you created - use an image snipping tool or take a screen shot), or make a comment here on this post, or write a Facebook status or a Google+ stream post.
My husband’s ancestor, Amos Gorrell, kept diaries and described their trip from Chillicothe, Ohio to their new home in Tipton, Missouri in 1866. Here is Chillicothe in Ross County, Ohio. Even though it is near the Scioto River, Amos and his wife, Catherine, traveled to Waverly by wagon.
Chillicothe Ohio to Waverly
At Waverly, they boarded a boat to travel to Portsmouth down the Ohio & Erie Canal. These maps don’t seem to show the canals, but from the photos I’ve seen, they were built near rivers.
Waverly to Porthsmouth
At Portsmouth the trip continued down the Ohio River to Cincinnati. They could not get another boat to St. Louis so traveled instead by train on the Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad. They did have to take a ferry across the Mississippi River to St. Louis. They continued their trip to Tipton aboard the Pacific Railroad.
portsmouth to Cincinnati
Now what we need is a map system like this that has the many railroads on it!






Thursday, July 18, 2013

On This Day – Birth of Mary Martha Douras, 18 Jul 1868

 
Mary Martha Douras was my first cousin, three times removed. She was born 18 Jul 1868 in Carleton County, Ontario, Canada to James Douras and Honora Gleeson.[1]  Honora Gleeson was the daughter of Martin Gleeson and Ann Gleeson, Irish immigrants who traveled to Upper Canada in the mid 1820’s.[2]  Mary Martha was the fourth child of James and Honora Gleeson. The family attended St. Phillips Catholic Church in Richmond and Mary Martha was baptized there.
Mary Martha Gleeson married Henry Thomas McCarthy on 16 Feb 1909.[3] This was Henry’s second marriage. His first wife, Anne Therese had died in 1906.
1909 Marriage_McCarthy-Douras_Richmond_p 34_OntarioCanadaCatholicChurchRecordsDrouinCollecti_49860137-cropped
Henry and Mary Martha had two children, Catherine Mary McCarthy and James Vincent McCarthy, added to the three children he had with Anne: Norbert F McCarthy, John L. McCarthy, and Newman S. McCarthy.
Mary Martha died 22 Dec 1947 at the age of 79 years.[4]
1947 Death - Mary Martha Douras McCarthy_Richmond p 183OntarioCanadaCatholicChurchRecordsDrouinCollecti_49860216-cropped
There is a photo of Mary Martha Gleeson in the Kilroe Family Tree on Ancestry.com:
http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/30734976/person/12510792931
 

[1] St. Phillips Church, Richmond, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada, Parish registers, 1836-1917, digital images, FamilySearch, baptism, 1868, Mary Douras.
[2] St. Phillips Church, Richmond, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada, Parish registers, 1836-1917, digital images, FamilySearch, marriage, 1860, Douras-Gleeson. Marriage stated Honora Gleeson was daughter of Martin Gleeson and Ann Gleeson.
[3] "Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967," Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), film #3515, 1909, Richmond, p 34, McCarthy-Douras.
[4] "Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967," Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), 1947, Burial, S2, Mary Martha Douras, Richmond, p 183.












Friday, July 12, 2013

Maria Agnes Voehringer’s Will: She Left Her Estate to Whom?

Last week I wrote about finding Philippena’s Voehringer family through some newspaper research I had done using the Louisville Courier-Journal on ProQuest.com site. You can read about it here.
In that story, I found a newspaper article where May Agnes Haebe, Philippena’s sister, filed in court contesting the will.[1] What was so nice about the article was that Mary listed all of her living brother and sisters by name in the suit: “her sisters, Mrs. Barbra Kilgus, Mrs. Rosina Noelling, Mrs. Philipine Woolenweaver, and her brother, Jacob Vohringer.” Mary Agnes Haebe felt that her mother could not have written the will.
I had written that I should next search for Mary Agnes Voehinger’s will and saw that FamilySearch has Kentucky Probate records online. They are not indexed but are browsable. Luckily they are listed by county. In Jefferson County, there are only will records from 1784 to 1901. Since her will would have been filed sometime after her death in Dec 1898, I started with volume 22, Will Records, 1896-1999. The newspaper article above stated the will was entered on 2 Feb 1899, so I clicked to that part of the book by browsing and found it on page 317.[2]
Oh, was I in for a surprise. On page 317, her will was written in German using the German Gothic script! Fortunately, the clerk had someone transcribe it in English and it was on the following page. Glancing between the two documents, it looked like a pretty good translation and transcription.

1899 Will of Maria A Vohringer - Jefferson Co, Kentucky, Vol 22 p 316
The will began,
“As I, Mary Agnes Vohringer am in good health and good mind, so I will write my last will, that it gives no trouble after my death, all what is my own my household my clothes and money and all what I have, I give my daughter Rosiene Nolding.”
She continued, saying,
“I have been laying sick 2 years and she has waited on my me, and has and has paid Doctor and Druggist, she has also waited on my son Friederich as often as he was sick and was never paid my son Friederich called me to the bed and said to me to you belongs all what I have you know what belongs to Rosiene at least 2000 Dollars.”
So this seems to be an explanation why she was leaving everything to her one daughter, Rosiene (Rosina Nolting). Rosina took care of her mother and her brother, Frederick, before his death (in 1895).[3]
She spoke of wanting a lot in Cave Hill (cemetery) and a tombstone, and had already paid the $800 for it. She said again that she “have my good mind. I know what I am writing.”
I think that she was worried about one of her children trying to break the will. She had seen her daughter, Mary Agnes Haebe and son, Jacob Vohringer, do it with Friedrich’s will in 1895:[4]
"A Will Contest." Jacob Vohringer and Maria Halbe yesterday filed an appeal to the Circuit Court from the order of the County Court probating the instrument offered as the will of Frederick Vohringer. It is alleged that the document was probated upon an ex-parte hearing. The appellants who are among the heirs-at-law of the deceased, claim that he left no will, but died intestate."
So she wrote in her will,
“Should my other children the will of my son Friederich break then I will have that all goes to my daughter Rosene Nolting, as my other children have never done anything for me, also done nothing for my son Friederich and the House which Charles Nolting has from my son Friederich has from my son Friederich nobody shall take away from him because he owed it to him.”
So Maria has made it so only her daughter Rosina and her son, Charles, get her personal and real property. She then mentions her children:
“If still something is remaining after my death and all debts and burial expenses are paid, then I give my daughter, Barbere Kilgus 5 Dollars my daughter Mary Hoebe 5 Dollars my daughter Phillipena Wollenweber 5 Dollars my son Jacob Vohringer 5 Dollars if the will of my son remains standing and still something is remaining of Property which is not sold that belongs half my daughter Rosiene and half my daughter Phillipine and if either of my children attempt to break my will, that one shall receive nothing.”
The mother did give all of her children something, even if it was only 5 Dollars. She, again, stated that if they tried to break the will, they would get nothing.
Next she spoke about her grandson,
“My daughter son Charle Nolting has kept all the property in order he had to buy all that belonged to the Houses and paid workmen and for that I give him a note which shall after my death be paid. All wills which I wrote before the death of my son Friederich shall not be valid, but still I will thither write that my daughter Barbere always was good to me. I was 25 years years with my daughter Rosiene Nolding she has cared for me. I set in Charle Nolting as Administrator of what I leave behind without surety.”
The last bit of the will was really shocking.
“I will yet write hereto Jacob Vohringer and Mary Hoebe were my children but they were my enemies.”
Wow! Was there ever drama in that family! Wish I knew more. Were Jacob and Marie mean to their mother, or was it that their mother was the mean one, forcing the other children to ignore her for their own sanity?
The next step now is to find the court records to see how the suits filed against Frederick Vohringer’s will and Maria Anges Vohringer’s will turned out. To me, the will of Maria Agnes Vohringer seems valid. She did not leave out any of her children. Some of her children were just unhappy about what their share would be.
 

[1] "Not Her Will," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 19 September 1899, p 6, Mary Agnes Haebe Sues; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed 13 June 2013), Newspapers.
[2] Maria Agnes Vohringer (1899), Wills: Bk 22, p 317-19; County Court, Louisville, Kentucky; digital images, “Kentucky Probate Records 1792-1977, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 8 Jul 2013).
[3] "Kentucky,Death Records, 1852-1953," database & images, Ancestry.com, Mortuary records,, Mar 1895, p 20, Fred Vohringer.
[4] "A Will Contest," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 17 April 1895, p 7; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed 13 June 2013), Newspapers





















Saturday, July 6, 2013

Philippine Voehringer’s Family is Found!

It all started with a newspaper article in the Courier-Journal, a newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky. I was searching this newspaper in the ProQuest.com newspaper site that the attendees at IGHR at Samford University had access to.  There was a newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky and I had Wollenweber ancestors in Louisville. So in my search I found an article about real estate transactions. Philippine Wollenweber, a widow, was selling her interest in the estate of Fred Vohringer to Rosina Noking.[1]
Well, light bulbs went off in my head! Voehringer was Philippine’s maiden name. I knew this from her marriage record to Ludwig W. Wollenweber.[2] Selling an interest in an estate meant she had some connection to this Fred. Vohringer. And could Voehringer and Vohringer be the same name?
The complete transaction as printed in the newspaper went like this:
“Philippine Wollenweber, widow, to Rosina Noking, interest in estate of Fred. Vohringer, deceased, and being one-half interest in 20x145 1/2 feet, west side Twenty-sixth street, 75 2/3 feet south of Grayson, $500 cash."
So she was selling her one-half interest in a piece of land on Twenty-sixth street. Was she selling the half interest to the person who had the other half interest? And how did Fred. Vohringer relate to Philippine?
So more research was needed. I found a couple more Courier-Journal articles using Wollenweber and their variant spellings in the search. I found a 19 Sep 1899 article, entitled, “Not Her Will: Mary Agnes Haebes Sues.”[3] Its transcription is here:
Not Her Will.
Mother Incapable of Making Such a Paper.
Mary Agnes Haebe Sues.
   Mary Agnes Haebe filed in the Circuit Court yesterday a petition in which she seeks to set aside an order of the County Court probating the will of her mother, Maria Agnes Vohringer.
   The latter died on Christmas day, 1898.  The plaintiff names as defendant her sisters, Mrs. Barbra Kilgus, Mrs. Rosina Noelling, Mrs. Philipine Woolenweaver, and her brother, Jacob Vohringer.  The plaintiff claims that the paper admitted to probate on February 2 last, as her mother's testament, was not her will.  She was not, it is alleged, mentally capable of making a will, and the paper is alleged, mentally capable of making a will, and the paper is alleged to have been procured by fraud and undue influence."
Well, there’s Philipine Woolenweaver, which is very close to Wollenweber (which means in German, wool weaver). Here Philippine is listed as a sister to a Rosina Noelling. Well, the name begins with an N and ends in ing like the previous newspaper article. Newspapers are notorious for misspelling surnames. Philippine is also listed as a sister to Mary Agnes Haebe, Barbra Kilgus and Jacob Vohringer. Where was Fred Vohringer? Was he not a brother? Or had he died previously to this article?
From this article, I have a possible mother as Maria Agnes Vohringer. Possible siblings:
  • Mary Agnes Haebe
  • Barbra Kilgus
  • Jacob Vohtringer
  • Rosina Noelling (or Noking)
More searching and I found the article about Fred Vohringer. Guess who contested his will? Jacob Vohringer and Maria Halbe.[4] Here is that transcription:
"Jacob Vohringer and Maria Halbe yesterday filed an appeal to the Circuit Court from the order of the County Court probating the instrument offered as the will of Frederick Vohringer.  It is alleged that the document was probated upon an ex-parte hearing. The appellants who are among the heirs-at-law of the deceased, claim that he left no will, but died intestate."
This article stated that Jacob Vohringer and Maria Halbe were brother and sister to Frederick Vohringer. If he was a brother to Jacob and Maria, and Philippine was a sister to Jacob and Maria, then Philippine was a sister to Fred.
It is very exciting to find some evidence of additional family. More research is needed. I can search for the wills for both Frederick Vohringer and Maria Agnes Vohringer. Familysearch.org has the Jefferson County wills online so I will search them out. I also need to check court cases to find out how the suits turned out. Did Mary and Jacob win their suits or did the court let the wills stand as written? Time to order films from familysearch.
But so far, I’ve rounded out Philippine’s family as:
  • Mother: Mary Agnes Vohringer, died 25 Dec 1898
  • Daughter: Maria Halbe/Haebe
  • Daughter: Barbra Kilgus
  • Daughter: Rosina Noelling/Noking
  • Daughter: Philippine Wollenweber
  • Son: Jacob Vohringer
  • Son: Frederick Vohringer
Oh, why are these people important? Philippine Voehringer was my husband’s second great grandmother. Her daughter, Matilda Wollenweber married Frederick Henry Davey.[5]

[1] "Real Estate Transfers," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 13 July 1901, p 10, Philippine Wollenweber to Rosina Nolting; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed 13 June 2013), Newspapers.
[2] Kentucky, Louisville, Marriage Registers, Family History Library microfilm, 882708, vol 6-7 1853-1860, vol 7 p 98, Wollenwebber-Voehringer, 1858.
[3] "Not Her Will," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 19 September 1899, p 6, Mary Agnes Haebe Sues; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed 13 June 2013), Newspapers.
[4] "A Will Contest," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 17 April 1895, p 7; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed 13 June 2013), Newspapers.
[5] They were married in Charlestown, Clark Co, Indiana, but I have not found the official marriage record yet.