Tuesday, August 7, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 32: Youngest: Father & Son Both the Youngest

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

My grandfather, William Cyril Hork, was the youngest of ten children born to Johan Anton Hork and Julia Ann Sievert.[1]

His eldest sister, Mary, died before he was born in 1895 of blood poisoning.[2] By 1900, two of his oldest siblings, Ida and Susan, were out of the house. Susan had married Andrew E. Hart on 20 May 1900.[3] Ida was living in Spokane, Washington.[4]

His father was a tailor[5]  He also had a drinking problem and lived at home on and off.  Finally he left the family.[6]  In 1906, he died in Sheridan, Wyoming, destitute.[7]

Cyril was just seven years old and never really had a father. He did have four older brothers, three of whom never married. The oldest, Albert, was twenty years older than Cyril and lived at home most of his life. He may have been the “father” figure for Cyril.

Cyril served in the U.S. Navy during World War I aboard a submarine tender.[8] In 1922, he married Anna Maria Sullivan, a school teacher in Hamilton. They married in Butte, Montana at St. Patrick’s Church.[9] They then moved to Southern California. Cyril probably remembered the mild weather when he served in Long Beach. Or they followed Anna’s sister, Loretta and her husband, Leroy Patterson.

They had four children, three daughters and then the youngest child, William “Billy” Joseph Hork, who was born in 1930.[10] During the depression, Cyril worked odd jobs, some for the WPA.

Cyril also had a drinking problem. By 1940, Anna and the kids were living alone and then moved to Napa to be near her brother-in-law, Vir Quigley. Billy was just ten years old and now he had no father in his life. Perhaps his uncle, Vir, took on the role or maybe being in Boy Scouts helped.[11]

So two generations of the youngest in a family, both losing their fathers at a young age. It must have been difficult not having a father figure in their lives. However, they had sisters and brothers who probably helped fill that role.




[1] 1900 U.S. census, Ravalli County, Montana, population schedule, ED 81, Sheet 15a, p 33 (stamped), household/family 285, John A Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 Jun 2011), citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 914.
[2] Oregon State Board of Health, Certificate of Death, 1895, Mary Hork.
[3] Ravalli County, Montana, marriages, v. 1 1893-1904, p 360, No. 354, 1900, Susan Hork & Andrew Hart, FHL Film 1905836.
[4] Spokane City Directory, R.L. Polk & Co, 1897, p 346, Miss I Marie, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[5] “A Tailor-Made Man,” ad, Western News, 10 Apr 1901, p. 1.
[6] “Sheriff Watts and Deputy Pursuing Three Men,” Butte Miner, 17 May 1902, p. 13, digital image, Newspaper.com.
[7] “The Carbolic Route,” Sheridan Enterprise, 17 Aug 1906, p. 1.
[8] Military Enlistments (Montana), World War I, Montana Adjutant General's Office Records 1889-1959 (RS 223), Montana Historical Society Research Center, Helena, Montana., World War I (HAUGEN-JACOBSON), Cyril Willis Hork, ser. no. 173-64-55.
[9] St. Patrick's Church, Butte, Montana, Marriage (Church) Record of William C. Hork & Anne M. Sullivan, p 434, Hork-Sullivan.
[10] California, Department of Health Services, Department of Public Health, Vital Statistics, Certificate of Birth, San Bernardino Co, Ontario, 30-026547, William Joseph Hork, issued 2 Apr 1990.
[11] "Boy Scout Bond Sales Rise to $53,750 Total," Napa Journal, 11 Jun 1945, p. 8, col. 5.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 30-Aug 5, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Volunteered at the Contra Costa County Historical Society on Tuesday, working again on the Finding Aid. Probably about half way through the Special Collections. The two biggest collections will be the most challenging.

Also spent five hours at the Oakland Family Search Library. We almost have more volunteers than patrons and most of the patrons are very self-motivated and need no assistance. So I brought a big box of slides to be scanned. In this way, I became familiar with one of the scanners so I can help a patron in the future. I spent a couple of hours scanning slides I had taken in my first trip to England and Scotland in 1975. The scanning part was simple, though time-consuming, but the biggest work was renaming each image and sorting them into chronological order. Some places I didn’t remember where they were, but uploading an image to Google Images, helped me find the location.

Participated in the Certification Peer Group. After checking in, we discussed what we would study next. The idea of reviewing the new Professional Genealogy book was most popular. We’ll start with the chapters most connected to the portfolio. I read the chapter about proof arguments and case studies, because that is the area of my portfolio that I’m working on.

Research work. The previous week, I received the book Columbia to the Rhine: Being a Brief History of the fourth Engineers, and Their Trip From the Columbia River, in the State of Washington, USA, to the Rhine River in Germany. This is the regiment that my great-uncle, Jack C. Sullivan, was in. After poking around in the website of the World War I Museum, I found this book. I was able to purchase it from Amazon. He is listed in the back under Company E. I’m in the process of reading the book from cover to cover. This way, I will learn about what the regiment did during World War I. Someday, I want to go to NARA in St. Louis to look for Morning Reports for his company.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:
This week’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “oldest” so I took the eldest child of a family and wrote about Philippine Mathilda Voehringer, who was the third great-grandmother of my children. I also wrote the next three posts, as I'll be away from my computer for three weeks. They are all scheduled to come on on Tuesdays.

Webinars: viewed this week:
“CompGen, Germany’s Genealogy Mega Site” presented by Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, CG.  This webinar is available at Legacy Family Tree Webinars for those with subscriptions. This site is full of wonderful resources on German genealogy. I have looked at it in the past, focusing only on the databases. Teresa showed us that there is so much more: a wiki, family books, gedcoms, gazetteers, funeral cards, to name a few resources. It is very strong with regional resources, which is very good to know! I will be adding this webinar to my German Genealogy Handout resource list.

Other
I helped Elaine pull weeds and tidy up the native garden at the sidewalk in front of the Kiwanis Club. After the weekend with over one hundred degree weather, it was a pleasant 80 degrees while we worked. It looked pretty good by the time we were finished.


My sister and brother have been evacuated from the Ranch fire near Nice in Lake County, so they are staying down here. We got together with the whole family at Spaghetti Factory for lunch on Sunday. It was great having everyone together and getting a chance to talk to my brothers. Us sisters get together often but not always with my brothers.

My sibs: for once we didn't stand in birth order
Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, August 2, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 31: Oldest: Oldest Child of Johan Adam Voehringer & Maria Agnes Reiff

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

The first child born to Johan Adam Voehringer and Maria Agnes Reiff was named Philippine Margaretha Voehringer. She was born 18 February 1832 in Unterhausen, Schwarzwald, Württemberg. She lived just over one year, dying on 14 April 1833.[1]

Their second child was also named Philippine Margaretha, born 28 May 1834.[2] She was the 3rd great-grandmother of my children and the oldest child who lived to adulthood.

She was confirmed when the family was living in Bronnweiler. She then left for America, arriving on the SS Gebhard in New York on 1 September 1857.[3] It is not clear she traveled alone or with other known people.

A year later she married Ludwig Wilhelm Wollenweber on 5 September 1858 in Louisville, Jefferson Co, Kentucky.[4] They married in St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church by Augustus Bargas. Ludwig was a widower, having been previously married to Anna M. Mertens, who died 19 July 1858.[5] Ludwig and Anna had four sons.

Ludwig was a liquor dealer with his own business. By 1860, their first born child, Matilda, was already born. They had five daughters total, though Emilie would only live about 18 months.[6]

Ludwig died 16 May 1873 in Jeffersonville, Clark Co, Indiana, which is just across the Ohio River from Louisville.[7]

As a widow, she worked as a seamstress to support her family.[8] She remained a widow until her death, 1 January 1913 in Louisville at the age of 78 years.[9] She died of chronic bronchitis and was buried at Eastern Cemetery.[10] According to a bible record, she had fourteen grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.[11]

Unfortunately, I have no photo of her, her husband, or any of her children. But I found a postcard of the church where she was married.





[1] Evangelische Kirche Unterhausen, Taufen 1808-1875, 1832, no. 4, Philippina Margareth, FHL film 1569153
Item 3. The death was written on the baptism as 14 Apr 1833.
[2] Evangelische Kirche Unterhausen, Taufen 1808-1875, 1834, no. 13, Philippina Margareth, FHL film 1569153
Item 3.
[3] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), 1857, SS Gebhard, No. 104, Philippina Vohringer.
[4] Louisville, Kentucky, Marriage Registers, vol. 7, p 98, 1858, Wollenwebber-Voehringer, FHL film, 882708.
[5] St. Paul's Evangelical Church (UCC) (Louisville, KY),  vol. 3, Deaths 1855-1871, no. 215, p 129, Anna  Elisabeta Wollenweber; FHL microfilm 1531401 item 6, accessed 16 Jan 2013. Record is in German.
[6] For birth, see St. Paul's Evangelical Church (UCC) (Louisville, KY), , Baptisms Vol 5, 1862-1867, 236, Emilia Wollenweber, no. 597; FHL microfilm , 1531412, item 2. For death, see Eastern Cemetery Records, Louisville, Kentucky, Bk 3, p 15, L.W. Wollenweber’s child, FHL 2046977i3.
[7] “Sudden Death of a Well-Known Citizen,” Evening-News (Jeffersonville, Indiana), 16 May 1873, p 1, col 1.
[8] 1900 U.S. Census, Clark Co, Indiana, ED 8, sht 8, dwelling 138/family 157, Philipena Woolenwebber, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com  2 Nov 2017), NARA T623, roll 363.
[9] Commonwealth of Kentucky State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Death Certificate, no. 1483, Jefferson Co. (1913), Mrs. Philipina Wollenweber, digital image, "Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1953," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[10] "Burial Permits," Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY),13 Jan 1913,p 10.
[11] Family data, Thomas Davey Family Bible, (Moore, Wilstch, Keyes & Co: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1859); original owned by [address for private use], transcription done by Mary Davey Korn, granddaughter of Thomas Davey.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 30, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 23-29, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Presented at the Sacramento German Genealogical Society on the topic of Focused Research: Using Research Plans. I was a little nervous at first but then got right into it. The recording is available at their website for thirty days. Presenters also come in early for their study group and a couple of people sat at my table. When we have big name speakers, the table is usually over-flowing.

Participated in the Certification Peer Group on our way down to L.A. using my phone. I like meeting better on the computer. We continued talking about case studies, using the tips from the BCG Action Group mailing list.

Participated in the DearMyrtle study group, AmericanGen on Wednesday. These are now twice a month and we finished up chapter 7. I also went on the Mondays With Myrt program to ask a question about the FamilySearch catalog. No one had the answer and we tried to post the question on an online forum. I haven’t heard the answer yet.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:
My 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about color and I chose two color photographs I had of a yellow jeep my grandfather owned after World War II.

Other
I had the second laser surgery on my right eye this time to correct an issue with narrow angle, in the hopes to prevent a type of glaucoma. The day of the treatment is shot for me, as my vision was fuzzy and the eye very sore. Luckily Norman was free to drive me around.

We also took a trip down to Santa Clarita for the yearly Nilsen Family Reunion. We drove in the electric car and had to make many stops to charge it. The first one in Atwater, where we wondered around in Target for an hour. The second stop was in Madera, where we ate dinner at a Mexican restaurant. Then we drove to the Walmart south of Bakersfield. That charging session was very challenging because the battery was very hot and so the charging was much slower. Took us two hours to get enough to make the climb up the grade. Once at the top, we gain power on the way down. We arrived at the Marriott after 1 am.

The reunion was at Castaic Lagoon and it was about 100 degrees all day. The kids went into the water but I sat visiting, drinking two cans of water and one bottle of soda. It was a small crowd but gave us a chance to visit with everyone. We ate dinner with Norman’s brother, Brian and then went to Eric & Melissa’s home to visit some more.





The ride back on Sunday started at noon. Our first stop to charge was at Visalia. We ate lunch at a sports bar and watched the Giant’s game. We continued up Highway 99 to Atwater. Another hour there, and I found some items to purchase at Target with gift cards I had. Our last charging occurred in Tracy at the mall. There were others there and we had to wait. We barely had enough to get home as we arrived with less than 5% left! Although our new car can go 160 miles on a charge, we learned that the hot weather and driving brings the battery temperature up. We hadn’t considered that. Coming home, once close to the bay area, the weather began to cool down into the low 80s and high 70s. Much better. 

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 16-22, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
I helped a researcher who came into the History Center this week to do some research in court records on men from China. She actually found quite a bit of information in our loose files.

We had a very nice conversation with Tom Jones at our Writers SIG meeting. He gave us some great tips about writing and editing. What I took away from the talk: write about the person, not the research. Find the theme and weave that into the story: introduce it, draw it out in the narrative, and then end with theme.

Watched a webinar about numbering genealogies, given by Alice Vogt Veen and then made more changes to my numbering in my KDP.  I have decided that I’m done making changes. It still matches the examples in Numbering Your Genealogy but I learned the difference between styles in the Register and the NGS Quarterly systems.  We have a new member in our Certification peer group.

Attended another presentation given by Gena Philibert-Ortega given at California Genealogical Society library. She spoke about the 1920s and gave us a taste of food and spoke about many activities of the era. A bonus was I transported her to the library and back, so got extra time with her. I also volunteered at the library at the desk. It was very quiet.

We continued to work on the presentation proposals for the IGGC and getting closer to having our choices finalized.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:

Other
We visited our daughter, Elizabeth, in Sebastopol. We first ate at Handline where I tried the tacos and tostadas. We then checked out the progress on the cocktail bar. Then we took a hike on a watershed trail that is included in the new map of restaurants, wineries, and hiking trails in West Sonoma County. Check out this blog post written by Elizabeth about the map. After that hike, we continued toward Highway 1 and made a stop at the beach. We drove back to Sebastopol through Bodega Bay. Dinner was eaten at Lowell’s. It was a very nice day.




Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 21, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 29: Music

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Who is or was musical in our family?

My daughter, Margaret, plays the piano, sings, and dances, as well as acts. Her favorite music is show tunes. In junior high and high school, she played percussion instruments.





Her grandmother, Thelma, sang in the St. Stephen's Church choir for over fifty years. She also loved classical and opera music. She had such a strong diaphragm from singing that she could blow up air mattress in no time at all.


My father-in-law’s uncle, Fred J. Davey, was a music teacher who played trombone and led the church orchestra and the Odd Fellows band in Springfield, Missouri.





My paternal grandmother, Anna Sullivan, was in her college Glee Club. She later was a school teacher, who probably loved singing with her classes. She taught us lots of fun songs that we sang while washing dishes.

My maternal grandmother’s cousin, Erwin M Loveless, was a musician who played by ear. 

It's nice to see those in the family who had some talent.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 9-15, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Attended Gena Philibert-Ortega’s presentation at the Sacramento Public Library on Sunday about how to use Internet Archive. I have used the site before but picked up a few tips from her today such as getting a library card so I can “check out” books that are not freely downloadable.

Made more progress on my certification portfolio. I returned to the KDP to correct my numbering after reading Warren Bittner’s article in the latest NGS Quarterly, where he showed the numbering system for foreign-born ancestors. We discussed it some during our certification peer group meeting. Examples could be found in the old BCG Standards book. We all got into the classes we wanted for 2019 SLIG.

Flew to San Diego to attend the Team Leader meeting for the International German Genealogy Conference (IGGC) that the Sacramento German Genealogical Society and the German Interest Group of the San Diego Genealogical Society are putting on next June. We made some great progress.

Attended the Monday Morning group where we all shared some genealogy finds. I shared the new book, Researching Like a Pro.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:
  • My 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about my traveling aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron on her half-way around the world trip with three friends.

Other
Outdoors activities included conducting the phenology project at Strentzel Meadow, where we saw two California Quail in the walnut tree. I brought the camera with a telephoto lens and got some shots of the birds.

For sports this week, I woke early to watch most of the matches of the Wimbledon games. Enjoyed both the women’s final and the men’s semi- and final matches. Got to see a little of the final World Cup. Also watched two Giants-A's games on television.

California Quail female

Shield bug eggs and nymphs on a Snowberry plant


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 28: Travel – Lorene’s First Leg of Trip from Tokyo

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Last week I wrote about my aunt, Lorene E. Hork Waldron, who spent a year in Japan working as a civil servant for the U.S. Army in Tokyo. She wrote many letters home to her mother, and two sisters, Virginia, and June. The family saved the letters and they were given to me in two old cloth-bound binders. One about her time in Japan, and the other about her travels west to Europe on her way home with three girlfriends, Anne Ankers, Mitzi Seale, and Donna Oehm.

The first letter was a postcard saying 
“Leaving Tokyo Aug 31. Arrive Bangkok approximately 25 Sept. Write there c/o American Express. Letter following. SIG: Lorene.”
She sailed on a freighter that loaded freight at Osaka, Kobe, Moji before leaving for Formosa, Manila, and Hong Kong, and finally arriving in Bangkok.

She wrote of the nineteen passengers on the Hermod. Besides she and her girlfriends, the only other Americans were two Presbyterian missionaries on their way to Formosa. The crew was Chinese.



One thing she wrote to her mother, 
“We all realize we’ve never had it so good and I wish so much that you [her mother] could enjoy this wonderful trip. The sea is so calm, the water such a beautiful color of blue, the sunsets are gorgeous…”
An Army news correspondent came on board just before they departed Japan to interview the four girls, who he heard were making a trip around the world. Another reporter, Robert J. Dunphy, caught up with them in Europe and an article was published in Stars and Stripes about their adventure. The start of the article began,
“Four lovely California Belles who took the wrong way home after quitting their Army jobs in Japan have bogged down here—happy but broke—on a trip that has taken them three-fourths of the way around the world. 
“Their adventures included a party with Red Chinese crewmen aboard a ship on the China Sea, a visit to an opium den in Bangkok, robbery by a monkey in India and pursuit by a cobra in Bombay. Also in hot pursuit throughout the journey was a seemingly endless army of suitors. 
“Traveling on a shoestring, the girls hitch hiked rides on desert airlines and went by slow freighter, sampan and camel to cut their costs for the three-month tour to about $700 each.”
It will be intriguing going through the letters telling of their adventures from the viewpoint of my aunt.


To be continued . . .


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 2-8, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Made some progress on my certification portfolio. I spent this week proofreading the KDP, first for spelling and grammar errors and then reviewing each of the citations. I added some photos to make it visually more appealing.
Five of us met in the certification peer group and shared our progress and lack of progress on our portfolios. It was nice hearing about Dennis’ class at GRIP.

At the history center, I started on a house history by first doing deed research, working my way back to find the first buyer. The client is interested in learning who built her house. I also attended the presentation of the interview with Betty, who was the first executive director of the center. It was very interesting learning how the archives all started.

I taught an Introduction to Genealogy class at the California Genealogical Society to three eager genealogists.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about three facts of my ancestor, Vincent Sievert.
And my 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about my independent aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron.

Other
Woke early every morning to watch tennis from Wimbledon. There has been some very exciting matches and lots of upsets. Looking forward to more this coming week.

Outdoors activities included working in the native plant garden at the Visitor’s Center and the phenology project at Strentzel Meadow. The weather has warmed up. I brought a camera with a telephoto lens and got some shots of various insects at the meadow.





Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Ahnentafel Roulette - Vincent Sievert


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1) What year was one of your great-grandparents born?  Divide this number by 100 and round the number off to a whole number. This is your "roulette number."

2) Use your pedigree charts or your family tree genealogy software program to find the person with that number in your ancestral name list (some people call it an "ahnentafel" - your software will create this - use the "Ahnentafel List" option, or similar). Who is that person, and what are his/her vital information?

3) Tell us three facts about that person in your ancestral name list with the "roulette number."

4) Write about it in a blog post on your own blog, in a Facebook status or a Google Stream post, or as a comment on this blog post.

My great-grandfather Johan Anton Hork, was born 9 November 1843. Divide by 100 gives me the round number of 18, which is Vincent Sievert. (Actually all of my great-grandparents gave me either 18 or 19).

Vincent Sievert/Siewert, was born 24 January 1823 in Schneidemuehl in Posen; died 23 January 1890 in Joliet, Will Co, Illinois.

Facts:
  • married Susanna Raduntz on 10 February 1850 in Schneidemuehl.
  • came to America aboard the ship Johanna Elise arriving in New York on 23 June 1852.
  • was a stone mason.
  • had eleven children with Susanna, ten born in Joliet.


Wished I had a photo of him.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 27: Independence


I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I have several independent, unmarried great-aunts, two of whom I’ve already written stories. My paternal aunt, Lorene E. Hork Waldron, was also a very independent woman who married late in life. She was our “fun” aunt. She had no children, but loved to pay attention to us.

After World War II, she worked for one year in Tokyo, Japan, for the U.S. Army. We know about her activities in Japan through the letters written home to her mother, and to her two sisters, Virginia and June. She left in early March 1952.

The first letter is dated 9 March 1952 and she wrote of the first few days at sea. She claimed she “hadn’t been sick yet but had her thunder mug available just in case.” There were 2500 people on board, with twelve civil service employees, 300 women and children, and the rest military personnel and ship’s crew. She never named the ship but refer to it as the “Mighty A” which could be the USS Alabama.

She arrived Yokohama and was bused to Tokyo, where she and the other civil service employees were placed in the Osaka hotel. Many of her letters were about the many dates she had with different officers and civilian men.

Her job was as secretary and the rest of the others in the office were men who were auditors. She had to type up their reports. She became very spoiled with a personal maid who took care of her laundry, cleaning, and any other chores that were needed.

In May she felt an earthquake. “Last Thursday we had one that was a pip. I was sitting at my desk at work when it happened and was really scared! It lasted a full minute and was the worst one here in seven years. This old building really shook and the fellas in the office said my face was red as a beet!”

By June the occupation was over and she was assigned a new job. She was in charge of a typing pool consisting of Japanese girls, who typed well but had poor spelling skills. Lorene had to take care of the classified and secret work herself.

She also wrote about her disappointment in her brother, Billy (my dad) wanting to marry Lea (my mother). She felt he could do better, but didn’t write why.

Lastly, even though she went out on lots of dates, she wrote to her mother, “I guess I’m not the marrying kind. I’ll find someone over here if it’s supposed to be but I’m certainly not going to get married just to get married. Being unhappily married and a good Catholic at the same time isn’t my idea of an ideal life. This is leap year though so don’t give me up!”


To be continued…..

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of June 25-July 1, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
At the History Center, I attended the presentation on our new database program, PastPerfect, given by Scott to all of the volunteers who could attend. They have made good progress so far—the maps have been added so far. A new query came in about the history of her house in Kensington. Will work on that next Tuesday.

I contacted a previous client about permission to use the research report for the certification portfolio and she has given me permission. I have just one more element to finish. Yeah! It would be nice to finish it up and send off before our trip to England.

I attended two webinars live this week:
  • The first webinar of the new Virtual Genealogical Society: “Future Trends in the Genealogical Industry,” by Thomas MacEntee.
  • APG webinar for the upcoming Professional Management Conference “Within a 60-Mile Radius: Kansas City—The Midwest Gateway to Genealogical Resources” by Kathleen Brandt.

I participated in the DearMyrtle AmericaGen Study Group, using Val Greenwood’s new book Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. We discussed Chapter 5 “Libraries and National Archives” and I discussed specially the resources I used when I took a research trip to Conway, Arkansas.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
  • “7th Blogiversary!” It’s really hard to believe I’ve been writing for seven years. I’ve been much more active this year and I’m glad for it.
  • Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about what happened on the day our grandmother was born. I chose my Mam-ma, Pansy Louise Lancaster, who was born November 19, 1913.

Other
Outdoor activities included:
  • pulling weeds at the John Muir National Historic Park. The Visitor's Center garden still has pretty blooming flowers.
  • conducting the weekly phenology study. Shirley and I saw a male California Quail making lots of noise which meant that his family was probably nearby. Pretty exciting, but I had the wrong camera with me.
  • working the Friends of Alhambra Creek booth at the annual Beaver Festival, this year in Susana Park

For entertainment:
  • I attended two San Francisco Giants games against the Colorado Rockies. Both nights, I sat in the Club level, where there is less wind. They won both nights!
  • Played with the Ukulele Jam group at the Senior Center


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, June 30, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 26: Black Sheep

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

This week the theme is black sheep, as in ancestors who didn’t behave well. Usually, these are those ancestors who caused enough trouble that their actions were found in the newspaper, making all of the details about their mishaps known to everyone within the reading public, and now with digitization, to anyone.

I don’t seem to have one of those kind of ancestors but thought about someone who just didn’t follow the norms. Or couldn’t seem to keep his act together. My great-grandfather, Johan Anton Hork, was just that.

He was born in Oberhundem, Kreis Olpe, in Westfalen on 9 November 1843.[1] He was the fifth child of ten born to Joseph Heinrich Horoch and Maria Catharine Trösster.

His father died on 5 October 1857 of dysentery when Johan was nearly fourteen years old.[2] Two of his younger siblings also died within days of their father of the same cause.

Johan came to America on 5 November 1870 aboard the SS Idaho.[3] He appeared to come alone. Why did he come? France had declared war on Prussia on 16 July 1870. Perhaps he didn’t want to be conscripted.

By 1872, he was listed in the Will County Business Directory as “Andrew Hork.” He was a merchant tailor, an occupation he would have his entire life. He worked at 7 Jefferson Street and boarded at 47 Bluff Street.[4]

He either met his future wife at church or around town. He married Julia Ann Sievert at St. John’s German Catholic Church on 6 June 1872. He was twenty-eight years old and she was eighteen.[5]

Their children were born in Joliet, Illinois; Aurora, Illinois; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Stuart, Iowa; Portland, Oregon; and lastly Hamilton, Montana. He tended to move every few years.

Sometime in the early 1900s, he deserted his family or was sent away, depending on who tells the tale. A newspaper article tells of Julia Hork making a complaint with the sheriff charging him with desertion.[6] My aunt told me he was sent away because of his drinking.

Drinking ended up being his problem. In Missoula, he was charged with being drunk and disturbing the peace on 27 Jan 1904.[7]

In 1906, he was in Sheridan, Wyoming, when he was “at his last straw.” He begged a bartender for a drink on a tab but he was refused. Instead, he drank from a vial of carbolic acid, dying that day.[8] The story was sensational that it was covered in other cities such as San Francisco and Denver, as well.[9]

The whole thing is sad. He appeared to be a good tailor. One newspaper account wrote, “Mr. Hork is a fine workman, and will get a big share of the business.”[10] My guess, he probably did good work, but the drink got into the way. Perhaps that was the reason for the constant moving until they got to Hamilton. Perhaps Julia put her foot down and said she was staying put.

Western News, 10 Apr 1901, p. 1


[1] Kirchenbuch, 1649-1874, Katholische Kirche Oberhundem (Kr. Olpe), (Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten im Bistumsarchiv Paderborn.Kein Verleih an europische Genealogie-Forschungsstell), Intl 1257842, "Taufen 1826-1847," p 139, baptism of Johann Anton Horoch.
[2] Katholische Kirche Oberhundem (Kr. Olpe) (Oberhundem, Westfalen, Germany), "Toten 1848-1878," Joseph Heinrich Horoch, 1847, p 33; FHL microfilm 1,257,843, item 3.
[3] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), film 336, 5 Nov 1870, SS Idaho, line 39, no. 1030, Joh Hork.
[4] R.L. Polk, Joliet City Directory (R.L. Polk & Co. Chicago), 1872 (Will County Business Directory), p 71, Andrew Hork.
[5] St. John's Catholic Church, Marriage (Church) Record of Anton Hork & Julia Sievert, Joliet, Illinois, Marriages, p 13, Hork-Sievert, 1872.
[6] “The Tailor Was a Day Ahead,” Anaconda Standard, 15 May 1902, p. 14.
[7] “Police Court Notices,” Anaconda Standard, 28 Jan 1904, p. 14.
[8] "The Carbolic Route," The Sheridan (Wyoming) Enterprise, 17 Aug 1906, p. .
[9] “Whisky or Carbolic Acid and Hork Took the Latter,” San Francisco Chronicle, 22 Aug 1906, p. 15. Also “Refused Drink; Ends His Life With Poison,” The Denver Post, 20 Aug 1906, p. 2.
[10] “Community Happenings,” Ravalli Republican, 27 April 1900.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.