Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of June 11-17, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Monday Morning Genealogy session was small but everyone had opportunity to share and to collaborate with each other. We continued the conversation at IHOP.

At the History Center, we finished the processing and finding aid for the John Baldwin collection and started thinking about what collections to do next. I also began learning how to put the special collections into PastPerfect. Our monthly board meeting was this week. On Saturday, I attended the presentation at the Campbell Theater on Highway 21. I love the new theater seats in the theater and the presentations were wonderful with lots of nice old photos.

I gave a presentation on Beginning German Genealogy to the “How-To” series at the Concord Family History. Lots of enthusiastic people with great questions at the end.

For client work, I finished the client’s work and sent it off to him! I created a five-generation genealogy into book format with a table of contents and an index. I really hope he likes it.

Blog Writing: I wrote a few blog posts this past week:
A 52 Ancestors post about my great-grandfather, Thomas N. Johnston for Father’s Day.
A Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about what my father liked to do.

Three members of the Certification Study Group met on Friday. After checking in, we discussed using DNA in our research, possible classes to take at SLIG and GRIP, and what we would discuss next week.

Other
I took several walks and here’s a photo from one. I sometimes forget to take photos at events. I need to work on that!



Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, June 18, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 25: Same Name: Look at all of the Elizabeths!

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

My name is Lisa. I was not named after anyone. From name books, Lisa is derived from Elizabeth. Elizabeth is a Greek name, meaning either “oath of God” or “God is satisfaction.” Elizabeth was the mother of John the Baptist.

After doing a lot of family research, I have found many ancestors on both my father’s and mother’s sides, as well on my husband's side. I also named my first born, Elizabeth.

So checking in my RootsMagic database, which contains ancestors of my children, I found:
  • 10 Elizabeths with no surname
  • 86 people with Elizabeth as their first name
  • 46 people with Elizabeth as their middle name

There may have been more Elizabeths with the women whose middle names were listed as E. 

The closest people named Elizabeth in my father’s side of the family are:
  • My daughter, Elizabeth Ann
  • My sister, Sabrina Elizabeth
  • My great-aunt, Ethel Elizabeth Sullivan
  • My first cousin, once removed, Elizabeth Goe
  • My great-grandaunt, Elizabeth M. Gleeson
  • My second great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Tierney
  • My first cousin, once removed, Elizabeth L Hork
  • My first cousin, once removed, Elizabeth C Schwalen

My mother’s side are mostly from the South. I had to go back many generations before I found any Elizabeth names:
  • My three times great-grandmother, Elizabeth McCormack
  • My four times great-grandmother, Elizabeth S Neel
  • My first cousin, 4 times removed, Elizabeth Starks
  • My third great-grandaunt, Elizabeth N Coor
  • My first cousin, 4 times removed, Ann Elizabeth Welch
  • My third great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Welch
  • My fourth great-grandmother, Elizabeth Rebecca Young
  • My second great-grandmother, Eliza A Rodgers (which I didn’t count in the above nos.)
  • My third great-grandmother, Elizabeth Nixon
  • My second great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Loveless

Elizabeth names found on my husband’s lines:
  • My daughter’s grandaunt, Claire Elizabeth Gorrell
  • My daughter’s third great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Gorrell
  • My daughter’s first cousin, 4 times removed, Elizabeth Bliss
  • My daughter’s first cousin, 4 times removed, Elizabeth B Foughty
  • My daughter’s second great-grandmother, Catherine Elizabeth Shotts
  • My daughter’s third great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Shotts
  • My daughter’s third great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Bishop
  • My daughter’s first cousin, 4 times removed, Elizabeth Bishop
  • My daughter’s fourth great-grandaunt, Elizabeth Bishop
  • My daughter’s fifth great-grandaunt, Ann Elizabeth Bischof
  • My daughter’s sixth great-grandmother, Ann Elizabetha Ellrodt

This certainly doesn’t account for all of the women with Elizabeth as part of their name, but it’s a pretty good list.

I’d always wished my name had been Elizabeth; that Lisa had been a nickname from Elizabeth. That was why I named my daughters Elizabeth and Margaret, so they would have choices about nicknames, or not. Both are still called by their full names.

The Visitation
Philippe de Champaigne
1643–48

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What Did Your Father Love To Do?

Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):
1) It's Father's Day in the USA on Sunday, so let's talk about our fathers. 
2)  What did your father really like to do in his work or spare time?  Did he have hobbies, or a workshop, or did he like sports, or reading, or watching TV?
3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment on this post, or in a Facebook or Google+ post.
There were several things my father liked to do, especially after he retired: gardening, cooking/grilling, and football watching. I wrote about his love of football in this post

In 1990, they had to move because of the freeway behind them was expanding, so they bought the old Potter house across the street. This property was larger and the backyard was nicely landscaped. My dad puttered around with that and also grew a vegetable garden.

And then in the kitchen, he loved to create dishes from either food from his garden or veggies from the store. He specialized in stirfrys.

He also loved inviting his family over for backyard fun. The patio and pool was meant for entertaining and he took advantage of it.

Enjoying his backyard with family

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of June 4-10, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Family
This past week was more about family than genealogy. My daughter, Margaret was home for a wedding and we did several things together:
  • Monday evening, we met with my sisters, Sabrina and Renee, at Eureka, a new burger place at the Willows Shopping Center. Only Renee had a burger while the rest of us ate fish tacos. It was a great evening of catching up with each other.


sister, Renee, daughter Margaret, sister Sabrina, and me
  • Tuesday evening, we went to a San Francisco Giants game where we watched them play the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Margaret and me at AT&T Park

  • Sunday, we all attended the memorial for our long-time friend, Bill Swindell, held at Larkey Park in Walnut Creek, next door to the train club. I first met Bill when I joined the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society. We had been friends since about 1974, having attended many PCR conventions together. His wife, Susan, babysat my children for fourteen years, too. I’m great friends with her as well, through genealogy. It was very nice seeing all of his friends, Susan’s friends, and his children and grandchildren.

  • After the memorial picnic, the four of us met Elizabeth’s boyfriend, Tye, for dinner in Oakland at Comino on grand Avenue. Delicious dinner and great conversation as we tried five of their dishes and two desserts.


Tye, Elizabeth, Norman, Margaret, Lisa at Camino Restaurant in Oakland

Genealogy
At the History Center, I continued working on the John Baldwin collection with John. The photos are almost matched up the their documentation. I got a new assistant, Alex, who tackled the Nilda Rego's collection with it’s many boxes.

I volunteered at the Oakland FamilySearch Library from five to nine. It was very quiet there, with way more volunteers than researchers. I think we need to promote the library for evening research! I also volunteered at the California Genealogical Library doing desk duty. I had lots of customers but got in a little of some genealogical research.

For client work, I worked some more on the genealogy summary on the fourth generation.

Blog Writing: I wrote a few blog posts this past week:
  • A 52 Ancestors post about two of my ancestors, Ebenezer Loveless and Nathan H. O. Polly, who were ministers.




Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, June 9, 2018

SNGF -- Your Best Genealogy Research Find in May 2018 - Finding Uncle Jack's WWI Unit & Service No.

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1) What was your best genealogy "research find" in May 2016?  It could be a record, it could be a photograph, etc.  Whatever you judge to be your "best."

2)  Tell us about it in a blog post of your own, or in a comment to this blog post, or in a Facebook or Google+ post.

After listening to three presentations from Jennifer Holik at Rootstech, I have been wanting to learn more about my great uncle, John Cyril Sullivan’s military service during World War I. He was injured during the war that caused him problems his whole life.

I felt that I knew nothing about where he served. I was really bummed out when the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis sent back my request for his military records saying they had no record for him.

Mm. I have a photo of him in an Army uniform. His tombstone says he was in the Navy. So the fire didn’t destroy the Navy records, so likely he was not in the Navy.

Back to the drawing board. What I decided to do was create a timeline of what I had and knew about his service. Jennifer says that writing is the best way to work out problems and create new questions and research avenues.

Timeline of what I have:

I have not found a World War I draft card for him. But I did find a newspaper article about a letter to Mrs. H.H. Goe (Nellie Sullivan) from her brother, Jack Cyril Sullivan, saying he enlisted in an engineering corps at Vancouver, Washington. Newspaper article dated 16 June 1917.[1] So it is likely he enlisted before the draft.


In January of 1918, another newspaper article in the Anaconda Standard (15 Jan 1918), listed a roll of honor for the boys who had gone from the St. Paul’s parish to the service of the country in the army and navy.  Two Sullivan men were listed: J.C. Sullivan (no address listed) and Cyril Sullivan (west of the city). It is possible that neither of these men were our John “Jack” Cyril Sullivan.[2]


A 30 Aug 1919 article from the Montana Standard, “Large Sum Realized by American Legion” had a donor named Cyril Sullivan. Still not sure this is our Cyril. I have no records of Cyril living in Montana after he moved in the early 1910s.[3]


 A possible John C. Sullivan, b. about 1889, was listed in the 1920 census living as a boarder in Los Angeles, California. He was listed as born in South Dakota and a cement finisher in construction trade.[4]

He's in household no. 9
A voter list for 1926, has Jack C Sullivan listed at 356 S Columbia av, as a contractor. His wife, Effa L also lived at the same address.[5]


In 1933, he was listed in the National Veteran’s Home, Sawtelle, as Jack C. Sullivan, 46608. Info from the form:[6]

June 4, 1917, Sgt, Co E, 4th Engrs,
Discharged 6 Aug 1919, H. Russell, Wyoming, demobilization
Disabilities: CNS syphilis, Cardiac arrhythmia mod, Chr myocarditis mod, draining sinus region l. hip mod.
wife Mrs. Effa, 729 Elm Av, Long Beach, Cal
born Mitchell SD, 49 yrs, 5-9”, rdy complexion, blue eyes, grey hair, white, cath, cement finisher
home history Aug 22, 1933
Army discharge
Pension certificate no. C-1779924


Reviewing this form, I realized that I need to search under the name "Jack C Sullivan."

This month, using the name “Jack C Sullivan” I searched on the Ancestry database “U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939.” I found Jack C. Sullivan, returning to the United States aboard the USS Von Steuben with  Company “E” Fourth Engineers from Brest, France on 21 Jul 1919, arriving 29 Jul 1919. The information on this list agrees with the information from the veteran’s home: Jack C. Sullivan, 568973, Sgt Enr, Co E, 4th engineers, John H. Sullivan, father, Anaconda, Montana.[7]


I finally found the information that I needed to make a second request for his military records. I sent for them using the previous request number. I got a response saying they found something and for $25 I can have copies of some pay vouchers. So what have I to lose? I sent in the money and am now waiting to see what I get.

Meanwhile, I so want to take a trip to St. Louis so I can do my own research in the Daily Reports of the Co E Engineers. Then I might find out how Uncle Jack was injured in the war, as it was a life-long injury.




[1] "Anaconda Well Represented," The Anaconda Standard, 16 June 1917; online images, GenealogyBank (http://genealogybank.com : accessed 7 August 2013).
[2] "Boys From St. Paul's in Country's Service," The Anaconda Standard, 15 January 1918, p 13; online images, GenealogyBank (http://genealogybank.com : accessed 7 August 2013).
[3] “Large Sum Realized by American Legion,” The Montana Standard, 39 Aug 1919, p. 14.
[4] 1920 U.S. census, Los Angeles, California, pop. sched., ED 302, sht 1, line 26, 9/9, John C. Sullivan, digital image,  Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 Dec 2011).
[5] "California Voter Registration 1900-1968", digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 22 Oct 2015), 1926, Los Angeles City, Precinct No. 704, Jack C. Sullivan and Mrs. Effa L Sullivan.
[6] "U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866-1938," database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 22 Oct 2015); citing NARA publication M1749, Sawtelle (Pacific Branch), 1933, Jack C. Sullivan.
[7] U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939, database, Ancestry (http:www.ancestry.com : 19 Apr 2019), U.S.S. Steuben, 19 Jul 1919, no. 16, Jack C. Sullivan, 568973; citing NARA RG 92, Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, roll 352..

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of May 28-June 3, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I presented the last class at the California Genealogical Society’s Record Series Class in Oakland on Wednesday. Nine of the ten were present and we took a class photo.

Records Class Participants

For client work, I spent most of Memorial day plus some other days, I worked further on the genealogy summary. Three generations have been completed.

I continued working on the John Baldwin collection with John. We almost have all the loose photos connected to the paperwork, so that they can be scanned next.

Blog Writing: I wrote a few blog posts these past two weeks:
I wrote about my husband’s great-grandfather and how far he traveled in his line of work in the 52 Ancestors post

Family

After spending time at the Coast Division Meet recording the auction transactions, I returned home to pick up my daughter and drive up to Sacramento to meet for dinner with my niece, Maddy and her mother. We ate at the Tower Cafe and had a very nice visit talking about their upcoming trip and future plans at college.

At the Tower Cafe

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, May 31, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 22: So Far Away: The Travels of Nils Malkom Nilsen

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Nils Malkom Nilsen, the maternal great-grandfather of my husband, was a minister for the Swedish Covenant Church, and from his birth in Åsenhöga, Jönköping län, Sweden, to his death in Hilmar, Merced County, California, he lived in at least twelve residences.
  • Åsenhöga, Jönköping län, Sweden
  • Fastorp, Lännäs, Örebro län, Sweden
  • Sheffield, Warren Co, Pennsylvania
  • Youngstown, Mahoning Co, Ohio
  • Cromwell, Middlesex Co, Connecticut
  • Harcourt, Webster Co, Iowa
  • Hilmar, Merced Co, California
  • San Pedro, Los Angeles Co, California
  • Turlock, Stanislaus Co, California
  • Escalon, San Joaquin Co, California
  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Co, California
  • Hilmar, Merced Co, California


He studied the ministry in Fastorp, Sweden, before immigrating to the United States to Sheffield, Pennsylvania, where he served at the Swedish Evangelical Mission Church from Spring 1889 to October 1890.

After leaving Sheffield, he next moved in Youngstown, Ohio, at the Swedish Church on Pine. He served there for five years. During that time, his wife died and he received permission returned to Sweden to get another wife.

In Cromwell, Connecticut, he served at the Swedish Evangelical Mission Church and started an orphanage, Cromwell Children’s Home, where he served as the superintendent.

He left for Harcourt, Iowa, in April 1903, and served at the Swedish Evangelical Mission Church for two and a half years. During that time a new church was built.

In 1907, he moved his family (wife and five children) to Hilmar, California. Besides being the minister at the Swedish Mission Covenant Church, he also purchased land to raise crops as a farmer. He was in Hilmar the longest at seven years.

He then served at several California churches: San Pedro, Escalon, and Santa Cruz, where he was in charge of a conference grounds at Mission Springs.

Also in the 1920s, he returned to Sweden to visit family.

The total miles traveled between his hometown in Sweden to his place of death in Hilmar was roughly calculated using online sources such as Mapquest.com and timeanddate.com.

277 km

Åsenhöga to Fastorp
250 km

Fastorp to Malmö
6234 km

Malmö to NYC

329 mi
NYC to Sheffield

120 mi
Sheffield to Youngstown

395 mi
Youngstown to New York
6234 km

NYC to Malmö
258 km

Malmö to Åsenhöga
6492 km

Åsenhöga to NYC

395 mi
NYC to Youngstown

492 mi
Youngstown to Cromwell

1274 mi
Cromwell to Harcourt

1829 mi
Harcourt to Hilmar

311 mi
Hilmar to San Pedro

320 mi
San Pedro to Turlock

28 mi
Turlock to Escalon

108 mi
Escalon to Santa Cruz

107 mi
Santa Cruz to Hilmar
6492 km
2916 mi
Hilmar to Åsenhöga
6492 km
2916 mi
Åsenhöga to Hilmar

Total kilometers traveled was 26,495. For miles, I multiplied this number by 0.621371 and the number of foreign miles was 16,463. The total miles traveled in the U.S. was 11,520.

So, Nils Malkom Nilsen traveled a total of 27,983 miles between residences and the two trips to Sweden! He certainly traveled far in his lifetime.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, May 28, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of May 21-27, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I drove up to Sacramento to attend the Sacramento German Genealogical Society’s presentation about military records given by Dr. Kathryn Marshall. She covered a lot of information in the hour and a half! The handout is full of great links.

Because I attended the above meeting, I did not volunteer at the History Center of the Contra Costa County Historical Society. However, on Wednesday, a group of us visited the Museum of San Ramon Valley in Danville in order to see their special exhibit on Chinese and the Transcontinental Railroad. It was a very nice exhibit. I also asked if we could view their archives and we went into both the library on the ground floor and the archives area on the second floor. I’m writing up an article for the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society’s newsletter about the researching opportunities at this museum.


I presented the fourth class at the California Genealogical Society’s Record Series Class in Oakland on Wednesday. Actually, it was the fifth class on researching offline because somehow I copied the wrong PowerPoint file unto the flash drive. Luckily I had the next class on the flash drive for the save!

I also participated in the California Genealogical Society’s all day seminar on Chinese Research. I helped handout packets at the beginning and was a consultant to answer questions during the breaks. It was a great seminar with over 70 people participating.

For client work, I drove down to San Jose to get a divorce packet but was unable to get it because it was too old to be in the computer and they have to order it from off-site storage. I arranged for them to mail it directly to the client. It was good to know of that if I go again. I also worked more on the genealogy summary for another client.

I did meet with the four others in our certification study group. Some progress has been made by all but we didn’t discuss the article as planned. I have been working on my case study, trying to add DNA evidence. Our next meeting will be in two weeks.

Blog Writing: I wrote a few blog posts these past two weeks:

Volunteer Work:
More weed-pulling this week in the native garden at the John Muir National Historic Park in Martinez. Several volunteers work on this garden located at the front of the visitor's center weekly.





Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Who Is Your Most Recent Unknown Ancestor (MRUA)?


1) Who is your MRUA - your Most Recent Unknown Ancestor? This is the person with the lowest number in your Pedigree Chart or Ahnentafel List that you have not identified a last name for, or a first name if you know a surname but not a first name.

2) Have you looked at your research files for this unknown person recently? Why don't you scan it again just to see if there's something you have missed?

3) What online or offline resources might you search that might help identify your MRUA?

4) Tell us about him or her, and your answers to 2) and 3) above, in a blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a comment on Facebook or Google Plus.

In December 2016, we wrote about our MRUA and I wrote about no. 19, Susanna Raduntz. I also wrote about nos. 20 and 21, Jeremiah Sullivan and Mary Sheehan. Their parents are still not known.

Today, I’ll write about the next nos. 36, Christoph Siewert and 37, Anna Marianna Ewald. They were the parents of Vincent Sievert, who was born in Posen and married Susanna Raduntz on 14 January 1811 in Schniedemühl, Posen.

What I know about Christoph Siewert: He was born about 1766, based on being forty-five when he married Anna Ewald on 14 January 1811 in Schneidemühl. He died 3 February 1841 at the age of seventy-five. Anna Marianna Ewald was born about 1785. She died 17 November 1845 at the age of sixty.

I have the same problem with Vincent’s parents as I have with Susanna’s parents. There doesn’t seem to be earlier records in Schneidemühl. I also know the marriage of Christoph Siewert to Anna Marianna Ewald was his second marriage. But that is all I know. The researcher, who obtained this marriage said that there were no more records at the Diocesan Archives in Koszalin.

I may never find out more about the Siewert or Raduntz families unless I go to the archives and conduct my own research.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, May 25, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 21: Military: George Gorrell Served in WWII

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

George Joseph Gorrell, U.S. Army Air Corps


Before World War II started, my father-in-law, George Joseph Gorrell, was training at the Curtiss-Wright Technical Institute of Aeronautics in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California. He was learning how to work on airplanes.



His World War II Draft card had information about his physical features. He was six feet tall and weighed 160 pounds. As a young man, he had brown hair, brown eyes, and a dark complexion. He was 25 years old.



After the training, he worked at McClellan Air Force Base in North Highlands, California, just north of Sacramento. He received more training there on hydraulics. He worked on landing gear.


 He was inducted in the Army Air Force on 27 July 1943 in San Francisco as a private. He went to England where he serviced hydraulic landing gear with the 913th Air Engineering Squadron. After the collapse of Germany, he was stationed there until he was discharged as a staff sergeant. He had his camera and took many photos. He printed them out as contact sheets because he had no enlarger. Someday the negatives will be scanned.




He also received an award for creating an improved tool.


Thank you for your service, George!


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, May 21, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of May 7-20, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I worked two Fridays this month at the Desk of the California Genealogical Society’s library. The first Friday I had a couple of researchers looking for their aunt. Last week I had two researchers looking for someone to translate a record written in Portuguese. I sent them up to the FamilySearch Library.

Our CGS Intro Class group had a meeting, as we are changing the format. Each first Saturday class would be one of three types of class: overview, records, and organization. We talked about who would work on which part and scheduled ourselves for the following year. I’m to work on the overview class.

I did get to meet with the Certification Study Group. All five of us were able to meet and discuss our progress. I had worked on my case study thinking about how to incorporate DNA into the argument. We also discussed the Helen Leary article from the 1999 NGS Quarterly supplemental issue on Evidence.

The monthly Monday Morning Genealogy group met and I picked up Kathie at BART. We discussed lots of different topics: DNA, archive websites that have digital images, and successes of research. We continued the conversation at IHOP afterwards.

Our Annual Meeting for the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society was on the 10th. During share time, I shared about receiving the personnel files of my grandaunt from the National Personnel Records Center at NARA, St. Louis. The packet I received was over 75 pages and was filled with information about her job in Greece as well as lists of previous jobs. After Greece, she worked for the Bureau of Reclamation in Sacramento.

Lastly, I worked on my client’s genealogy, incorporating the research into a finished product. It definitely taking longer than I expected. I emailed him, explaining that it would take longer. I’m waiting to hear from him before continuing any further.

Blog Writing: I wrote a few blog posts these past two weeks:
·         I wrote about languages in one 52 Ancestors post and about Mother’s Day in another 52 Ancestors.
·         I also participated in one Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about my mother.

Class
I completed two more classes for the California Genealogical Society’s class Intermediate Genealogy: Records Series. Weeks two and three were about Probate and Immigration.

Baseball
I attended three baseball games with my friend, Beth. The San Francisco Giants played the Cincinnati Reds and out of the three games, the Giants won two. We had great seats on the lower level and the field seemed so close. 




Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 20: Languages

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I had to deal with a foreign language early in my genealogy research because my father’s paternal side is German. My father’s maternal side is Irish, but so far those records have been in English.

I studied German four years in high school and four quarters in college, so I wasn’t afraid to research in German records. Though once I found them, I didn’t realize the lettering would be so difficult to read!

I lucked out in knowing where to look in German records. The marriage between my great-grandparents, Johan Anton Hork and Julia Ann Sievert, gave the birthplace of Johan Anton as Oberhundem, Kreis (county) Olpe, Westfalen. It is important to know the name of the village in order to find local records.

The Family History Library had microfilm of church records for this area and I tackled looking for his baptism. The book with these baptism records did have an index and I found Johann Anton. It wasn’t too hard to read most of this.



As I worked my way back in time, the handwriting got harder to read. Looking for Anton’s father, Joseph, I found the Hs looked way different. It took a lot of practice and help from other researchers to transcribe these records.


I also used letter guides I got from the Family History Library, that can now be found online here.


German wasn’t the only language I’ve worked with. My husband’s maternal line is from Sweden and I used Swedish records to find several generations of family. My best resource was a book called Your Swedish Roots by Per Clemensson & Kjell Andersson.

And for a client, I tackled French Canadian records. The handwriting was easy to read, but I used the French Word Lists from the FamilySearch Wiki to understand the words used in the records.

So languages I’ve used in genealogy include:
  • English
  • German
  • Swedish
  • French
  • Spanish
  • Latin



Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Celebrate Mother's Day - Show Us Some Photos

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1) Sunday, 13 May is Mother's Day in the USA. Let's celebrate it by showing some of our photos with our mother.

2) Extra credit: What did you call your mother during her life? What did your children call your mother?

3) More extra credit: Have you written a biography or tribute to your mother? If so, please share a link if you have one.

4) Share your photo(s) on your own blog post or in a Facebook or Google + post. Leave a link on this blog post to help us find your Mom photos.


I don't have a lot of photos with my mother but I do have some pretty special ones. These were all taken within the first year of my birth. The color one is from a slide--no idea who took it.






I called my mother "Mommy" and then "Mom." My daughters called her Grandma Lea. Unfortunately, she died when they were really young and didn't know her well.

This is probably the last one with my mother. She didn't like having her photo taken.


I wrote a tribute to my mother last year.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.