Monday, February 26, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of February 19-25, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I have written the blog post for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, this week about an heirloom made by my father-in-law.

I also did a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about which ancestors were alive in 1900. I used the 1900 U.S. Federal census records to determine this.

No work was done on my portfolio, but I did meet with my certification discussion group this week for a short time. My internet connection was spotty on the train as we were passing through the rural areas outside of Santa Barbara.

I continued to worked on the lesson plans, primarily for the Immigration and Naturalization class for the upcoming Intermediate classes that I’m teaching in March for the CCCGS and Concord FHC, and in May for CGS at the Oakland FHC. There is so much to discuss in that topic and I want to have some hands on exercises. Luckily, it’s the second class, so I have some extra time. 

Travel
Monday we visited the World War II museum in New Orleans. It was excellent but we only had time to view the three main exhibits. The Road to Tokyo was very moving and well done.


We rode the Natchez, a real steam boat along the Mississippi River on Tuesday.



We also toured the St. Louis Cathedral and the Katrina and Mardi Gras exhibits in the state museum.


Wednesday, we were back on the train for the start of our return home. We rode the Sunset Limited for two days to Los Angeles and then the Starlight. It is great to be back home. Our total route for the trip can be seen here:

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Where Were Your Ancestors in 1900?



Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:
1)  Where were your ancestors in the year 1900?  Make a list with their ages and location (with the street  address if you know it).
2)  Share your information in your own blog post, in a comment on this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a link to your post in a comment to this post.

I used the 1900 census to determine where my ancestors were living.  I have a total of twenty-four (24) ancestors who were alive in 1900. Two of them were very young. I had a couple who had died just before 1900 as well.

Paternal Grandparents
William Cyril Hork, was just one years old, born 10 July 1899 in Hamilton, Ravalli Co, Montana.


Anna Marie Sullivan, was seven years old, born 15 October 1892 in Anaconda, Deer Lodge Co, Montana.

Paternal Great-grandparents
Johan Anton “John” Hork and Julia Ann Sievert, were living in Hamilton, Ravalli Co, Montana.

John H. Sullivan and Anna Marie Gleeson, were living in Mitchell, Davison Co, South Dakota.

Paternal Great-Great-grandparents
Susanna (Raduntz) Sievert, a widow, was 68 years old and lived in Joliet, Will Co, Illinois.

John Gleeson and Margaret Tierney were living in Portland, Multnomah Co, Oregon.

Paternal 3X-great-grandparents
None were alive

Maternal Grandparents
My maternal grandparents were not yet born.

Maternal Great-grandparents
Thomas Newton Johnston was born 25 Jul 1885 and was living with his parents in Comanche Co, Texas.

Nell L. Hutson was born 8 Feb 1888 and was living with her parents in Comanche Co, Texas.

George Warren Lancaster was born 19 Jan 1893 in Erath Co, Texas and was living with his parents there.

Lela Ann Loveless was 2 April 1896 in Conway, Faulkner Co, Arkansas and was living with her parents there.

Maternal Great-Great-grandparents
Reuben Mack Johnston and Olivia Jane Jones were living in Comanche Co, Texas.

Peter Hayden Hutson and Sarah Helena “Sallie” Selman were living in Comanche Co, Texas.

William Carl Lancaster and Martha Jane “Doll” Coor were living in Erath Co, Texas.

Ebenezer Loveless and Eliza A. Rodgers were living in Faulkner Co, Arkansas.

Maternal 3X-great-grandparents
Amanda A. (Haley) Jones, widow, was living in Hill Co, Texas with a daughter.

George Wilson Lancaster, divorced, was living in Stephenville, Erath Co, Texas.

Martha Jane (Polly) Lancaster Parks was living with her second husband, Noah F Parks in Maricopa Co, Arizona.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 8: Heirloom “George’s Woodshop Days”

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

While visiting a first cousin in Florida, we discovered several pieces of woodwork done by my husband’s father, George Joseph Gorrell (1915-2011).

The first was a table, signed by him. It was believed that he gave the completed table to his parents, Joseph Norman Gorrell and Matilda Pearl Davey, perhaps after making it in high school woodshop. The cousin got the table after the grandparents died.



She also had two other items made by him but not signed: a recipe box and a covered bowl.




Someday the table will make its way to us so we can pass it down to our daughters. They would probably like to have a piece that their grandfather had made.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of February 13-18, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I have written the blog post for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, this week about events on Valentine’s Day. I also did a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about female ancestors pretty hair.

No work was done on my portfolio. I'm on vacation!

I worked more on the handouts and lesson plans for the upcoming Intermediate classes that I’m teaching in March for the CCCGS and Concord FHC, and in May for CGS at the Oakland FHC. I still need to do some work on the Immigration class.

Travel
Monday we traveled from Orlando to Ocala to visit Norman’s cousin, Shirley. On the way there, we traveled along highway 441, making two stops to do some bird watching. The first stop was at Hidden Waters Preserve in Eustis, where we hiked to a sink hole. There we found a tortoise before he dug himself a hole to hide. Watched several yellow-rumped warblers and common mergansers.


The second stop was at Bourlay Historic Nature Park near Leesburg. It was a nice walk in among the trees and along the lake.


We spent four nice days with the cousins, visiting lots of interesting places. They were kind enough to take me places where I might see birds. We also checked out for alligators, but saw none. We did see some bald eagles, though. We also had great conversations, as cousins should. 


Silver Springs State Park


Black Skimmers on the Gulf Coast

White Ibis in Ocala

Friday, we returned to Orlando to catch the Silver Star to Washington, D.C. and then caught the Crescent from D.C. to New Orleans, which we arrived in on Sunday evening. We saw more of North Carolina and Virginia while going north and more of Georgia and Alabama coming south. 

What a wonderful week!

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Female Relatives With Beautiful Hair

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has another great theme for this week:

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1)  This week we're going to look for female relatives with beautiful hair in our photograph collections.

2)  Find one or more photographs of females in your ancestral families that have beautiful hair, by your own subjective beauty standards. 

3)  Show the photograph(s) if you have it/them and tell us a bit about the person shown.   If you don't have a digital photograph, please describe the female and her beautiful hair the best you can.

4)  Write your own blog post, or a comment to this blog post, or a comment on Facebook or Google+.


In one photo of Muriel, I am fascinated with her hair and the pose she was set up in. Muriel was the only child of my great-grandaunt, Mary Martha Gleeson and her husband, Warren Edmond Gilbert.


Muriel Martha Gilbert was born 19 October 1895 in California, probably in Los Angeles. She never married and lived with her mother until her death in 1956..

The photos that I have of the Gleeson and Tierney families came from a photo album that she created and carefully labelled. It was a very good start for me in researching the Gleesons and Tierneys in Ontario, Canada.


She had very unique handwriting, as you can see here in an address book that was full of family birth dates and anniversaries. Check out how she made her M and N.




Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of February 5-11, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I have written the blog post for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, this week my favorite names and making lists of names.

I also did a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about my grandfather’s beard.

No work was done on my portfolio.

I am still working on the handouts and lesson plans for the upcoming Intermediate classes that I’m teaching in March for the CCCGS and Concord FHC, and in May for CGS at the Oakland FHC. I also worked on the publicity write-up for the CGS class so it can be put on Eventbrite.

We had an ICCP Conference Presenter’s Team conference call about the upcoming Call for Presentations that will roll out at the beginning of March. We have nearly everything all set. The conference will be in Sacramento in June 2019. I understand now why it is hard to break into the conferences as a speaker. There are just so many slots available and often many of them are already slotted.

Travel
We arrived in New York Sunday night aboard the Cardinal. We woke up on the train about Kentucky and continued traveling along the Ohio River, into West Virginia, Virginia, before turning north through Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, then New York City. It snowed a little too much to see the beautiful scenery.

Monday through Wednesday was spent with our daughter in New York City. We visited the Empire State Building, Macys, Lord and Taylor on Monday, and visited the Transit Museum and rode the Long Island Railroad on Tuesday. Ate at a variety of restaurants including Kat’s Diner, Tick Tock, P J Clarks, and Insa.


Wednesday, we left on the Silver Meteor for Orlando, Florida. I like these sleeping cars as the top bunk has much more head room, with plenty of room to sit up and change your clothes, along with extra storage space. Our car attendant was Vivian and she was really sweet and cheerful. The train had a new dining car with a brand new kitchen set-up. The food was pretty good. The trip down was a little slow and we arrived late in Orlando. 

Florida is wonderfully warm and we spent two days at two different Disney parks: Magic Kingdom and Epcot Center on Friday and Saturday.



Sunday was a quiet day in Orlando. It was a lot warmer than expected and a shopping to trip to Target for some T-shirts and shorts was in order. Wish I had brought my sandals.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 7: Valentine’s Day

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Two very memorable Valentine’s Days occurred one year apart in our family. In 1979, my parents were hosting a Valentine’s Day dinner with our immediate family when we got the call that our Nana had died. One year later, my brother, Steve. married his sweetheart, Tami.

Nana with 13 of the grandchildren
Anna Marie Sullivan Hork was eighty-six years old when she died. She was living in a convalescent home when she died. She was the grandmother of sixteen children and mother of three daughters and one son. She spent most of her life as a school teacher, teaching in Napa, California at a one-room schoolhouse on the Silverado Trail, and later in Concord at Williams School. She also substituted and taught CCD classes at the nearby Catholic church. Fun childhood memories of Nana include her beautiful African violets, yellow canaries, orange marmalade, and sour ball candies in a jar on the coffee table.




One year later, my brother, Steve married Tami Davenport in a lovely wedding in El Sobrante, California. They made such a cute couple. Unfortunately, Tami died in 2004 at the young age of forty-three. But their marriage was filled with love for each other and their two children.









Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, February 5, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 6: Favorite Name

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Oh, to pick a favorite name among my ancestors or my children’s ancestors, would be like choosing a favorite child. Each of my children are favorites but in different ways.

Surnames
Now, I have favorite surnames that are nice to put into search boxes because the search returns are small in number, such as:
  • COOR
  • GLEESON
  • GORRELL
  • HORK
  • HUTSON
  • LUNDQUIST
But then that really depends on the locality or database being searched. Looking for COOR in Copiah County, Mississippi brings up lots of COOR families. Search for them in Erath County, Texas only brings up a few.

I have least favorite names, but there are just too many of them:
  • JONES
  • SULLIVAN
  • JOHNSTON
  • WELCH
  • DAVEY
But like the list above, if searching in a very small, specific place, in a specific time period, the search results might be small enough to be able to work through with even these common surnames.

First Names
Now for some favorite first names.  I probably have more Anna or Elizabeth names in my database than any other female names. For male names, William or John probably top the list. I like Ebenezer and have a few of them. The funniest nickname I have is for Oral Dotterage Johnston, who was called “Pig” as a nickname. There was an article written about him in the Comanche Chief  29 November 1979. He was my great-grandfather’s little brother.

When I was young, about in middle school, I used to make lists of my favorite first names. I don’t remember if these were lists for future babies, or just names I liked. I would work through the alphabet picking one or two names for each letter that I liked. Here is a possible example of what a list might have looked like for both boy and girl names (who knows where those lists ended up):

A: Andrew, Anna
B: Benjamin, Bethany
C: Christopher, Charlotte
D: David, Daphne
E: Eric, Elizabeth
F: Francisco, Freda
G: Geoffrey, Greta
H: Hernán, Henrietta
I: Ian, Isabelle
J: Joaquin, Josephine
K: Keith, Katherine
L: Laurens, Liese
M: Martin, Margaret
N: Nathaniel, Nicola
O: Oliver, Olivia
P: Patrick, Pauli
Q: Quentin, Quinn
R: Raul, Robin
S: Sean, Shawn
T: Tomás, Theresa
U: Ugo, Ursula
V: Vincent, Victoria
W: William, Wendy
X: Xavier, Xeres
Y: Yves, Yvonne
Z: Zeke, Zoe

For my own children, I named my first child, Elizabeth and my second child, Margaret. Andrew and Patrick were possible boy’s names.

Other names on the list found their way into stories I have written, such as Hernán, Nathaniel, Oliver, Joaquin , Theresa, Freda, Liese, and Olivia.

Thinking up names by lists have also helped me go to sleep at night when my brain won’t shut down. Instead of counting sheep, I count names, letter-by-letter, and usually fall asleep before I get to the hard letters at the end.

Have you ever made of lists of names?

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 29–February 4, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
I have written the blog post for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, this week about Ellis Lancaster in the 1850 census in Lewis County, Missouri.

I wrote a blog post for Randy’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun about the upcoming Super Bowl.

I completed the homework for Chapter 2 of Val Greenwood’s Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy for the DearMyrtle study group. The online broadcast will be February 21.

No work was done on my portfolio, but I am studying the articles in the current issue of NGS Quarterly. There are some really interesting articles this month.

I am working on the handouts and lesson plans for the upcoming Intermediate classes that I’m teaching in March for the CCCGS and Concord FHC, and in May for CGS at the Oakland FHC. They won’t be exactly the same but will be fun to do!

Travel
We’re traveling but unfortunately I have been sick with the crud I was exposed to either during SLIG or on the airplane. Luckily, we have our own room on the train.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Super Bowl 2018 Edition

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1)  The Super Bowl is on Sunday, 4 February 2018 in the USA.  The New England Patriots are playing the Philadelphia Eagles for the National Football League championship up in Minnesota (an indoor stadium!).  The winners get to go to Disney World. 

2)  Predict the score for this game.  You have to predict the winning team and the closest to the actual score (point differential summed for both teams) to be the winner.  The winner of this contest gets announced next week in a Genea-Musings blog post. 

3)  Tell a story about your experiences playing football or watching professional football games.  Did you go to football games? Who in your family was the real fan of the game?  What were the pre-game routines?  How do you, or your family, react to good plays or bad plays, or wins or losses?

My responses:

I don’t follow football and have no idea who would win. My guess is Patriots 28, Eagles 10.

Now, growing up, my father followed football. He was a season-ticket holder for the Oakland Raiders in the late 60s and early 70s. The seats were on the first level at the end zone. I attended a couple of games with him until my mother learned to understand football and she accompanied him.

He later followed the San Francisco 49ers, probably after the Raiders went to Los Angeles the first time. He was a much more die-hard 49er fan, wearing team colors, and having Super Bowl parties.

He also kept track of all the teams during the regular season. I found charts he kept of the teams’ stats each week. He must have really enjoyed keeping up with all of the teams.


I’ll be traveling so will have no idea who wins.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.