Monday, October 15, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of October 8-14, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Family Research. Since I turned in my certification portfolio, I have felt a little off course. I’m not sure what I  should focus my attention on next. Perhaps I’ll look at my southern families in preparation for the SLIG class in January on Advanced Southern Research. I do have small projects that I had started:
  • my Aunt Lorene’s civil service records need to be organized
  • finish reading the book about the 4th Engineers in WWI to learn about what my Great-uncle Jack did
  • scan some paper items
  • file some paper items
  • process many folders of images from previous research at the Family History Library

Looks like I have found plenty to do!

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
This week’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “Sports.” I wrote about sporting activities of my father, William Hork, my grandmothers, Pansy Lancaster & Anna Sullivan, and my grandfather, Cyril Hork.

I participated in Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun. He used one of my suggestions and we wrote about Sports—this time I concentrated on my sporting activities.

Volunteer Activities: I worked all day at the Contra Costa County Historical Society’s History Center. There were a lot of old queries that I filed or fulfilled. I also spent the day at the desk of the California Genealogical Society’s library. I had two researchers come—one research her Mexican roots, and the other looking for books on Maine.

Intermediate Skills 2. We had our second class about military records at the FamilySearch Library in Oakland. I’m teaching the class for the California Genealogical Society and I have 15 students! They are seem excited to be in class and participated well. We’ll cover records in lists next week.

Other Activities. My husband and I visited several homes on the 2018 Home Tour conducted for the Martinez Museum. The homes were very interesting and it's always a great pleasure to see older homes and how they are decorated. We popped in for 5 minutes at the Shell Museum and hope to go back again soon. It will be a great place for research and I'll write it up.  Afterwards, we went to one of the new brew pubs, Five Suns Brewery at 500 Estudillo. They serve beer they brewed and some food from neighboring restaurants.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Sporting Activities

It's Saturday Night again - time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Randy’s assignment this weeks is:

1)  What sporting activities did you participate in as a youth and as an adult?

2)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a comment on this post with a link to your post.

Thank you to Lisa Gorrell for suggesting this SNGF topic.

Thanks, Randy for choosing my topic. I don’t know if the timing is good or bad. This week’s 52 Ancestors category was Sports and I wrote about my two grandmothers, grandfather, father, and my sporting activities. I only wrote a little—just what I had a photo for.

My first sport I remember playing was softball. There was a field two doors down from our house called Bertinoli’s field, as the family across the street owned the land. Later, when I was older, I realized it was just a small lot. But we were little—the oldest maybe 10, and only occasionally would anyone hit the ball over the freeway fence. Of course someone would have to climb the fence to get the ball—we only had one!

I played softball/baseball (don’t remember what kind of ball we used) in 4th grade with the boys during recess. I was the only girl. I loved baseball. I collected baseball cards. I watched the Giants on television. My grandmother (Nana) and my dad loved the Giants, and so did I. I liked playing infield, probably because I didn’t have to throw the ball so far. I was pretty small and didn’t have a lot of strength.

In 7th grade, my mom signed me up for an after school softball team. I remember practices were at the local elementary school, but not much about the actual games. I did play on a real team when a senior in high school on a youth league team. I played mostly short stop.

My favorite players on the Giants were Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Juan Marichal, Chris Speier, and later Mike Krukow, Johnnie LaMaster, and Joe Morgan.. My friends and I went to Candlestick Park and we could go to Ladies Day and sit in the bleachers for 50 cents. But often we bought box seats to sit up close. We used to go early to watch batting practice and get autographs. I have a small autograph book with lots of autographs.

In the 70s when the Big Red Machine was winning championships, my friend, who was born in Cincinnati, rooted for the Reds. I would, too. It was fun supporting a winning team and Johnny Bench was my favorite. He wrote a book called Behind the Bench and I got him to autograph it for me.

In college, I tried other sports in P.E. classes: tennis, volleyball, and badminton. I played one season on the softball team my freshman year and on the badminton team on my senior year. Playing sports was hard when my science labs were in the afternoons.

I played on a women’s team in Walnut Creek one season, when I was a junior or senior in college. Our sponsor was a pest control company and we were called the Lady Bugs. I played second base mostly. I didn’t play much after I got a job with BART. I worked nights and had weekdays off—wasn’t conducive to being on a sports team. Once a bunch of mothers from my daughter’s pre-school got a team together and I played short, second, or pitched. We were pretty bad!

I’m still an avid fan of the Giants and try to go to at least a half a dozen games per year. I attend mostly with my friend, Beth, but sometimes with my husband and daughters. I’ve had season tickets (15 games) twice, the first during the year the All-Star game was at Candlestick Park (1984), and the last season at Candlestick Park (1999). That was lots of fun

My daughters like to watch baseball, too. They never played softball, but rather focused on gymnastics and soccer. My husband and I knew nothing about soccer but after going to all their games, we got pretty good following the game.


Today, my personal sporting activity is focused on yoga, walking, and occasional pickleball. The sports I follow on television are major league baseball (Giants), tennis, and women’s soccer. 

1999 at Candlestick Park with my daughters
Me and my buddy, Beth
Me and Janice at an A's game
I have many more photos (actually slides) that I should scan. 

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, October 12, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 41: Sports


I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I thought I’d write about my immediate family who were active with sports.

I played softball in high school with the recreation department. In college at Cal State University Hayward, I played softball in Freshman year and badminton in my junior or senior year (can’t remember which). My schedule was too hectic with science labs to play much sports in college.



My dad (William J Hork) played football in high school in Napa, California, and could through the ball with either hand. He watched it actively until he died. He like to keep statistics of all the teams.


Both my grandmother’s played sports. Nana (Anna Sullivan Hork) played basketball, tennis, and volleyball in college (Montana Normal College).



Mam-ma (Pansy Lancaster Johnston) played softball with a women’s team in Erath County, Texas. Later after my grandfather died, she played tennis and was bowling into her 90s.


My grandfather (William C Hork) played baseball as a young man.
Anaconda Standard, 8 Aug 1920, p. 14
 Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 8, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of October 1-7, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Intermediate Skills 2. I’m teaching the class for the California Genealogical Society at the FamilySearch Library in Oakland and I have 15 students! We had our first class about cemetery and funeral home records. They seem excited to be in class and participated well. We’ll cover military records this week.

Seminar. I attended the fall seminar with the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society, where we listened to Thomas MacEntee give four great talks. I got some great websites for searching for living people and I enjoyed both the lecture on collateral and cluster searching, and the Genealogy Do Over. His tips about spreadsheets were fantastic. A group of CGS members got together to take a photo.

Thomas MacEntee at the CCCGS Seminar

Webinar. I attended a Legacy Family Tree webinar,  “Remote Research in the Databases of the Daughters of the American Revolution Genealogical Research System” given by Rick Sayre. It was very informative and I might investigate the possibility of having a Revolutionary patriot ancestor.

Portfolio work. I worked on the final part of the case study and finished. I then investigated how to submit the portfolio. After meeting with the Certification Peer group, I did submit and pay for my portfolio. My first feelings were dread—like I’d done something wrong. But then I felt relief that I was finally finished and could work on something else. About an hour later, I was thinking: I’m bored, what shall I do now? Time to make To Do lists.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
This week’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “ten.” I posted two photos the ten children of John Gleeson and Margaret Tierney.

I participated in Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun and answered 20 questions that had been posed by Ellen Thompson-Jennings.


Other Activities
We visited our daughter in Sebastopol. First we shopped for apples and pumpkins, then headed for Healdsburg using the back roads. Along the way we stopped at a small winery, Foppiano Vineyards, for some tasting. In Healdsburg, we had a delicious dinner at Valette.


Pulled weeds this week at the John Muir National Historic Park at the native plant garden. Here are some photos of flowers still blooming.




Friday, I spent a couple of hours working my way along Alhambra Creek, taking photos. I tried to take one at every bridge that crosses the creek from Marina Vista to Alhambra Way, looking both north and south. In some places, the sun made dark shadows. I’ll try again on a gray day. These photos might work out for the remake of the Friends of Alhambra Creek brochure.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- 20 More Questions

It’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun! Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has another challenge for us:


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  Ellen Thompson-Jennings wrote 20 More Questions About Your Ancestors and Maybe A Few About You this week and Linda Stufflebean thought it would be a great SNGF challenge.  I agree!

2)  Copy the questions from Ellen's post or from my post below, and insert your own replies.  Be sure to comment on Ellen's blog so she knows you wrote about it.

3)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a comment on this post with a link to your post.

Q1:   Why do you love doing genealogy/family history?
A1:   I loved researching in school, learning about new things, but I never liked writing the paper. I’ve learned that writing the paper is just as important.

Q2:  How far have you traveled to research an ancestor?
A2:  This summer we went to Cornwall and I did some unplanned research there.  

Q3:  What do you think your favorite ancestor would think of our lives today?
A3:  My favorite ancestor is Anna M. Sullivan Hork, my grandmother. I think she would be amazed by the advanced technology used in schools. She taught in a one-room school house in Napa.

Q4:  What do you think that your ancestor would like/dislike?
A4:  I think that she would like that medicine has advanced quite a bit, allowing people to live longer. She would not like the decisiveness of politics today.

Q5:  What was the most unusual cause of death that you’ve found?
A5:  Martin Gleeson died from an infection due to a piece of lumber that was imbedded in his leg. If only there had been antibiotics then.

Q6:  Which ancestor had the most unusual occupation?
A6:  My husband has a collateral ancestor who was once mayor of Cincinnati and later governor of Ohio. There were also a couple of actors and actresses.

Q7:  Have you ever gone to where your ancestor lived and it felt like home even if you’ve never been there before?
A7:  Yes. I visited Conway, Arkansas, and I really loved the small town.

Q8:  Do you have a distant ancestor  (several generations back) that looks like someone in the family?
A8:  One of my great-great aunts looks like my sister. 

Q9:  What is the oldest ancestral photo that you have?
A9:  I have a couple of really old photos of either the Gleeson or Tierney family members in Canada—probably in the 1860s or 1870s.

Q10:  Did you have an ancestor that had an arranged marriage?
A10:  Not that I know of.

Q11:  If you could live in the time period of one of your ancestors what year would it be? Where would it be?
A11:  About the 1860s in Titus Co, Texas. I would like to ask my 3X great-grandparents, Samuel Johnston and Elizabeth McCormack where they was born in South Carolina, where in Alabama the children were born, and who their parents were.

Q12:  Which ancestor was married the most times?
A12:  I haven’t found anyone who was married more than two times.

Q13:  If you’ve tested your DNA what was the biggest ethnicity surprise?
A13:  That I had no Native American ancestry and neither did my grandmother.

Q14:  Did you have a female ancestor that was different or unusual from other females from that time period?
A14:  My great-great aunt, Elizabeth Gleeson, was pretty independent, who never married, but traveled a bit—even going to the gold rush in Alaska.

Q15:  Did your ancestor go through a hardship that you don’t know how they managed?
A15:  My great-grandfather lost his wife while having young children at home. He didn’t remarry until later in life. My great-aunt talked about how hard it was to grow up without a mother.

Q16:  How often do you research? Are you a genealogy addict?
A16:  I try to do some genealogy every single day—either research, reading, or writing. When I’m not at my computer, I think about genealogy.

Q17:  Do you have someone in your family that will take over the family history?
A17:  No. I might have to write lots of books.

Q18:  Have you had a genealogy surprise? What was it?
A18:  No really.

Q19:  Are you a storyteller? What’s your favorite family story?
A19:  No, I tend to be too literal and write like a technical writer. I need an editor to help make it more like a story.

Q20:  What was your greatest genealogy discovery?
A20:  There is no one great discovery. I enjoy each new discovery as I learn more about my family.  

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 40: Ten

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Ten: the number of children that John Gleeson and Margaret Tierney had, all born in Ontario, Canada. John and Margaret Gleeson are my second great-grandparents. All ten children grew to adulthood and there is no evidence that a child of theirs died in childhood. The first nine children were born about two years apart. However the last son, Francis was born five years after his sister, Margaret. It is possible there was a miscarriage or stillborn birth—just no record of any baptism.

I have no photos of the whole family together, but do have photos of the five boys and the five girls. I can identify the youngest children but not the rest for sure.


Their boys were: Martin Gleeson, John James Gleeson, Michael Peter Gleeson, William Charles Gleeson, and Francis Thomas Gleeson.


The girls were: Anna Marie Gleeson (my great-grandmother), Mary Martha Gleeson, Elizabeth M Gleeson, Helena Mary Gleeson, and Margaret Teresa Gleeson.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 1, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of September 24-30, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
I finished four out of the five lessons for the Intermediate Skills 2 course I will be teaching in October & November at the Oakland FamilySearch Library on behalf of the California Genealogical Society. I plan to work on the fifth class after getting some input from the students so I can tailor it to their wants.

I viewed only one webinar this week: “Methods For Identifying The German Origins of American Immigrants,” by Michael D. Lacopo, and participated in the DearMyrtle AmericanGen Study Group on Wednesday. We discussed researching online.

I attended the Sacramento German Genealogical Society meeting and learned about using the State Library resources. This week my volunteer work was at the Oakland Family Search Center. I sat with a young woman showing her some search techniques in Ancestry.com.

Portfolio work. I worked on the case study this week and I’m getting closer to the end. In our  certification peer group, we celebrated Faye’s successful certification and then discussed Chapter 13 in the new Pro Gen book.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
This week’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “on the farm.” I posted photos of my mother-in-law, Thelma and her siblings on their farm.

I participated in Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun and wrote about the pets I’ve owned.

Other Activities
I  went to yoga class on Tuesday and bird watching at Heather Farm Park on Thursday. It was the first time in months that I bird watched. Saw quite a few birds and the highlight was the Black-throated Gray Warbler, though I didn't get a photo of it.

Great-blue Heron

White-breasted Nuthatch
Saturday was the Archives Crawl. I volunteered in the morning at the History Center, and then checked out the other sites: Martinez Library, Martinez Historical Society, and the County Recorder’s Office. There were also other organizations at tables in the Veteran’s Hall. I visited each one and got literature about their archives or hours so I can visit them. I hope to get a few more articles written for the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society’s newsletter.

On Sunday was the last Giants game of the season and I spent the day with my friend, Beth. This game was really tough because they lost 15-0. This has not been the best season for the team, but I enjoyed most of the games I attended this year.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.