Monday, November 26, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of November 19-25, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Family Research. This week, I’ve been working on my Coor family, especially James Madison Coor, my 3X-great-grandfather. I have been checking the digital images I have in my folders against what events I have recorded in my genealogy program, RootsMagic. Sometimes, something gets missed. Also looking at the RootsMagic events, I could see possible missing events, so I then would go on Ancestry or FamilySearch to see if I could find them, such as a census, marriage, or cemetery record. I started with trying to figure out when James M. Coor left Mississippi and went to Texas. He owned land, so I focused on finding the land that was sold so he could move. I also discovered many other land transactions for him and others in his family. Lots more to do!

Blog Writing: I wrote two blog posts these two past weeks:
Week 47: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about what genealogical source we’re thankful for. I wrote about digital images found all over the internet. I worked on land records in Copiah County, Mississippi and used some examples in the post..

Cert Support Group: We didn’t meet this week due to the Thanksgiving weekend. However, Dennis and I emailed our case study and KDP to the others to read. I enjoyed reading Dennis’ with his use of DNA. I need to get some DNA learning in and start using it more.

Webinars: I attended several webinars this week:
  • BCG’s “Every Day Life of Our Ancestors,” by C. Ann Staley. She had so many great examples of places to learn about the lives of our ancestors. She had a four-page handout with loads of links.
  •  APG’s “Accounting Tips, Tricks and Hacks: What the Solo Genealogy Pro Needs to Know,” by Jim Beidler. Lots of great tips on running a business.
  • APG’s Writers SIG “Writing for the Record,” by Laura Murphy DeGrazia, who spoke about the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society’s journal called the Record. Her presentation was excellent and I wish I had New York ancestors.

 The NGS Quarterly study group met this week and we discussed Judy G. Russell’s article “George Washington Cottrell of Texas: One Man or Two?” We had a great discussion. 

Other Activities
This was a short week due to the Thanksgiving holiday. I spent time at the History Center on Tuesday, working on entering records from our Finding Aid in the Online Archive of California. I have entered twenty records so far.

It finally rained this week. The air is clearer and the fire up in Butte County is almost out. More rain to come this week. I threw out wildflower seed into the garden and hope some will grow for beautiful blooms in the spring.


Daughter, Elizabeth, came for Thanksgiving dinner. We ate a simple meal of turkey, mashed potatoes, vegetable, and stuffing. Afterwards we played Yamslam! Saturday, we went up to Norman’s brother’s house for another Thanksgiving dinner. It was nice seeing our niece, Maddy, home from college.








Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of November 12-19, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Family Research. My goal before the upcoming SLIG institute in Salt Lake City in January, is to clean up my files and database of my southern families. It might be more than I can do, but I worked on some Johnston lines. I found newspaper articles in J-TAC about my grandfather’s brother who played football for them. This newspaper is found on The Portal of Texas History. I also worked on lots Loveless newspaper articles from Little Rock newspapers at GenealogyBank. Examples of what I found:

5 Oct 1937, J-TAC, p 3
Toofer is my great-uncle
 
27 Jun 1954 Arkansas Democrat, p. 8c
Lovetta in the center is my 1C2R.
SLIG Virtual Practicum. Our last class in the practicum was this Saturday. We finished up a case of multiple named men in English parish records. It was probably the easiest of the five and I was happy with what I could do. Overall the course was worthwhile and I learned something about how I work. I do like to use Word and keep track of my searches there instead of creating a separate research log, though working in a spreadsheet can be useful when analyzing data.

Blog Writing: I wrote two blog posts these two past weeks:
Week 46: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about a random fact. I wrote about Luther “Toofer” Johnston who was center for the John Tarleton Agricultural College in Stephenville, Texas in the 1930s.

Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun. about our favorite genealogy resource. I wrote about all of the newspaper websites that I love to use. Last year we had the same topic and I wrote about FamilySearch.

CGS Introduction to Genealogy Course.  We’re working on a new format and I was tasked with creating a class on vital records. I have worked on the slides for that class this week. Then I’ll work on the handout.

Cert Support Group: We discussed Chapter 15 in the new Professional Genealogy book on Forensic Genealogy. I’m not really interested in doing this kind of work. I don’t mind doing record pulls for forensic genealogists.

AmericanGen Study Group. We met this week and discussed Chapter 13 “Vital Records” in Val Greenwood’s The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. I haven’t found the archive of the show online yet.

Webinar: I did attend the Florida State Genealogical Society’s webinar “Medical Genealogy: A Primer of Diseases That Killed Our Ancestors” given by Michael D. Lacopo. It was a great topic which he delivered very well.

Other Activities
This past week, I mostly stayed indoors due to the Camp fire up in Butte County that is sending smoke and poor air quality to the Bay Area. Whenever I left in the car, I kept the heater/AC off and used the seat heater to keep warm. The smoky air also kept the temperature in the 50s. I love “sweater weather” but would rather not have smoke. Hopefully next week it will rain.

I attended my two German language classes. The Wednesday class has ended for the quarter and will start up again in January. We’re reading a new book in the Monday class and will meet Nancy’s boarder from Germany next week.

I also drove into Oakland to do my volunteer work at the California Genealogical Society on Friday. Since many schools were cancelled, there was not much traffic. I didn’t expect any visitors due to the air quality, but I had two.

I spent time at the History Center on Tuesday, working on the Finding Aid, on Wednesday for the Board Meeting, and then again on Saturday, to ask Maxine about starting with entering the data at the Online Archive of California. We practiced by putting up three records. I’ll be glad when we have more collections up. This may bring in more researchers.

During Phenology at the meadow on Thursday, I saw lots of birds and recorded them at eBird. I saw my first robin and first Spotted Towhee for the season. I also saw for the first time a bunch of turkeys flying. Wish I had brought my camera, but only had binoculars.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What Genealogy Resource Are You Thankful For?


Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing's mission this week is:
1)  What Genealogy Resource are you thankful for?  Is it an organization, software, websites, repositories, persons, or something else?
2)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or on Facebook.  Please drop a link in a comment to this post so that every reader can read about your resource.
Here's mine:

I would echo Randy’s post of being thankful for FamilySearch. The best thing they did was put up the digital images of records even though they had not yet been digitized.

The next best site I’m thankful for are all of the newspaper sites that have digital images of newspapers. Many that I use are:

Free Sites:
Chronicling America at the Library of Congress website. There are lots of newspapers from every state that were published before 1923. There is no copyright so can be freely used in our work.

The Portal to Texas History has many newspapers useful for my research, especially in Erath County (thank you Stephenville Library for your assistance!).

Pay Sites:
Newspaper.com courtesy of Ancestry. I have found more useful newspapers here than at any of the other paid sites.

GenealogyBank is another favorite. I used to love their old interface but am still fighting the new one. I’m not a big fan of change.

Newspapers are just the best resource for filling in information about our ancestors. Not just for vital records, but for all kinds of other events that happen to them: accidents, new jobs, club meetings, visits from family, etc.

Newspapers also give you a feel and history of the time period where your ancestors lived. Search for topics besides their names. I love checking the weather or learning about election results.


Thank you to all the sources who have provided digital content!

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 46: Random Fact – Luther “Toofer” Johnston played college football

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

The college newspaper of John Tarleton College, The J-TAC, is available on the Portal to Texas History website. I have found numerous articles about my grandfather’s younger brother, Luther E. Johnston (1918-1970), playing center on the football team.

However, Luther was better known as “Toofer” and searches in the newspaper of “Luther Johnston” did not bring up matches. Yet, as "Toofer" Johnston, there are many articles about his football games and social activities in the years of 1936 through 1938.

He was first mentioned in newspaper in the fall of 1935, about his football exploits on the Yellowjackets team while still at Stephenville High School.

He played center for the junior college and was co-captain of the team in 1938. The team was referred to as Plowboys.

He was a member of the Sons of Tarleton Society (S.O.T.S.), serving as vice-president in 1937, and president in 1938.  He dated B.J. McMillan in 1938.

Also at the website was the 1938 yearbook for John Tarleton Agricultural College. 


From this photo, I can see where my brother got his curls.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 12, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of October 29-November 11, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Family Research. I spent most of the 11th, working on the Johnston-Couch line, picking up some 1940 U.S. census death, cemetery, and newspaper records on Ancestry, FamilySearch, and Findagrave. Two of my great-grandfather’s sisters married Couch brothers. There were a lot of Couch surnames found in the Comanche Chief newspaper of Comanche Co, Texas.

SLIG Virtual Practicum. I worked on Week 3's assignment while in New York and Week 4's when I got home. I have found that using a research log can be useful, but there is not enough space to write some analysis. I’m going back to a research report for Week 5. Week 4 was a kicker, with DNA analysis and research in English records! Thanks to Sheri for the help.

Blog Writing: I wrote two blog posts these two past weeks:
Week 44: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “Frightening.” I posted some photos of one of the many Halloween parties my parents had. One of the photos has a “ghost” in it.

Week 45: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about “Beards.” I wrote about John Gleeson, showing him in three photos sporting his beard.

Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun. About our Zig Zag ancestors. I could only go back five generations. This past week’s topic was what we collected as a child and I reposted one from two years ago.

Intermediate Skills 2. We had our last class about genealogy writing. I covered it in two parts: writing as we research (research plans, research reports, research logs), and final products (genealogies, family history, etc.). I think everyone liked the presentation very much. I forgot to take a class photo, so I have no visual record of the participants.

Cert Support Group: Dennis turned in his portfolio and now feels like I do: both relieved and sort of lost. When you work on something as hard as we did for nearly two years, you wonder what you should now do with your time. We also discussed Chapter 16 in the new Professional Genealogy book on DNA.

Other Activities
We spent eight days in New York City, traveling there to see our daughter, Margaret, in a new play called “Meg, Beth, Amy, Jo & Louisa” about Louisa May Alcott’s writing of Little Women. It was very good. They hope to take it on to the Fringe season.

We saw different things in New York City this time: Central Park, Roosevelt Island, Teddy Roosevelt’s Childhood Home, and crossing the Williamsburg Bridge into Brooklyn. We saw two Broadway shows: The Band’s Visit and The Waitress, and ate at some very nice restaurants. We also hit Katz Diner again so Elizabeth, who arrived in NYC just after Margaret’s play, could eat there. 






I also took a trip to New Jersey, met by friend, Judy Russell, and we went down to Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge for a day of bird watching. I shot some 150 plus photos and had great conversation with Judy. All in all, a great trip.





This past week, I mostly stayed indoors due to the Camp fire up in Butte County that is sending smoke and poor air quality to the Bay Area. 

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 10, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks--Week 45: Beards

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I wrote previously about my grandfather, Tom Johnston's beard in this blog post. For this week, I'll present my great-great-grandfather, John Gleeson's beard.

John Gleeson was born about 1835 probably in Ottawa, Canada. He married Margaret Tierney around 1858 in Carleton County, Ontario. They had ten children. In 1879, they moved to Dakota Territory to what is now Mitchell, South Dakota. Sometime after 1900, they moved to Portland, Oregon where he died in 1915.

John with 2 children c. 1860s

John, taken in Mitchell, South Dakota


John wore his beard all through his life.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Zigzag Ancestor Lines

Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun’s assignment this week:


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  What is your father's Zigzag Ancestor line (NOTE: I just made that up...}?  In other words, your father's mother's father's mother's etc. line back as far as you can go.

2)  Tell us in your own blog post (and drop a link here in a comment), or on Facebook with your response.

Here is my father’s Zigzag line:

1.  My father was William Joseph Hork (1930-2007) of Ontario, California and Walnut Creek, California.

2.  His mother was Anna Marie Sullivan (1892-1979) of Anaconda, Montana and Santa Clara, California.

3.  Her father was John H. Sullivan (1854-1931) of County Cork, Ireland and San Bernardino, California.

4.  His mother was Mary Sheehan of Ireland and Todd Co., Minnesota.

I can only go back this far with the Irish line. The records are either incomplete or they came from another place.

My mother’s Zigzag line:

1.  Lela Nell Johnston (1934-1992) of Stephenville, Texas and Walnut Creek, California.

2.  Her father was Tom J Johnston (1912-1973) of Gustine, Texas and Pleasant Hill, California.

3.  His mother was Nell Hutson (1888-1919) of Comanche Co, Texas.

4.  Her father was Peter H. Hutson (1853-1930) of Georgia and Comanche Co, Texas.

5.  His mother was Amanda Davis (1826-????) of Georgia and ????

I do not know what became of Amanda and where she was from. My mother’s lines can go back much farther in time, depending on which line I choose, however this line deadends on the female line.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.