Monday, January 21, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 14-20, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
This week I spent at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) in Salt Lake City. It’s held for five days at the Hilton Hotel. My course was Advance Southern Research, coordinated by J. Mark Lowe, along with Anne Gillespie Mitchell, Kelvin Myers, and Ari Wilkins. I am ready to start cluster research on my tricky families, and to listen for the stories when studying the records.

Also during the week, I saw friends from all over the U.S.  Many congratulated me on achieving certification. Others I met for the first time in person, even though I might be “friends” with them on Facebook. Then the rest were those I met for the first time. I’m great about the greeting and hugging but forget to take “selfies” with them. 

I did take photos with several groups: California Genealogical Society members at SLIG, the NGS Quarterly Study Group (we met for dinner on Monday), the ProGen 27 reunion (though I was in ProGen 21, but spend time with many of them weekly in our Peer Study group), and with the Certification Peer Study Group.




Blog Writing: I wrote the following blog posts this week:
Week 1: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks This week, I wrote about an unusual name of Drady Hutson. I don’t know if she was Peter’s wife or other family member. More research is needed.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: We produced photos of direct ancestors and I managed to find enough for six generations.

I also wrote three blog posts about my time at SLIG for a blogger contest.

Webinars/Study Groups Attended
Because I was busy with my own course, I did not attend any webinar or study groups this week.

Research
I managed to make two trips to the Family History Library to do some research. I searched through pages the Shane Collection that concerned the Chillicothe Presbytery searching for members of the Bishop, Shotts, and Gorrell families but found none. Then I worked in records of Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, searching for court records to correspond to some newspaper articles about Louis W. Wollenweber, one of my husband’s ancestors. I found some, and others I might have to write directly to the court for.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, January 18, 2019

SLIG 2019 Post #3

Four o'clock has come and we sadly finished up our class in Advanced Southern Research. It has been a great week learning about the particulars of southern research from the very esteem instructors, J. Mark Lowe, Kelvin Myers, Ann Gillespie Mitchell, and Ari Wilkins.


Anne taught us about cluster research and gave us tools to help us. Ari spoke about archives and special collections that are filled with wonderful resources that might have clues about our ancestors or help us learn more about the social, economic, and political history where they lived. I learned about specific manuscript collections from Kelvin and even used the resources to look at some records in the Shane Collection. And Mark spoke endlessly about listening for the story and to be ever ready to received the story from the records we collect.

My main take away from this class is to study the documents our ancestors created or were created about them. Study them deeply and listen for the stories they tell about their lives. Study the records of the people who were also a part of their lives: family, friends, associates, and neighbors. Their stories will certainly intertwine with the stories of my own ancestors, just as the family, friends, associates, and neighbors interact with my own life.

My goal in the coming months is to begin writing about my mother's southern ancestors, a request from my nephew. This course has given so much to think about when I review the documents I have collected and think about how I'll prepare for future research I might do. I would really like to take a couple of road trips to Dallas, Texas area and Mississippi.

Overall, SLIG 2019 has been a wonderful experience. I am thankful that the weather was pleasant and not too cold (only on the first day). I tried two new restaurants and had many meals with wonderful friends and acquaintances. I can't wait for the announcement for next year's classes at SLIG 2020 tonight at the banquet.


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

SLIG 2019 Post #2

It's Wednesday and we are over halfway through our week. I'm enjoying my class in Advanced Southern Research. Our instructors have given us great resources that will help add to knowing much more about our ancestors beyond the vital and census records.

Today at the Family History Library after class, I searched through some records of the Shane Manuscripts about the Chillicothe Presbytery. I was hoping to see some of my husband's ancestors' names Bishop, Shotts, and Gorrell, but these records didn't seem to cover the area in Ross County where they might have attended church.

I spent time looking at some Jefferson County, Kentucky and Louisville records for my husband's Wollenweber line. I did find a few court records, one that was available only on microfilm. I did not find everything, and might have to write to the court clerk in Louisville.

Today I also want to highlight some of the friends I have photographed this week.

Our Certification Peer Group
Table-mates in Advanced Southern Research class
Karlene and I worked the BCG booth on Monday at lunch
Two more classmates, Jacqi and Diane






Fellow researchers at the Family History Library
#SLIGFun!

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 3: Unusual First Name: Drady

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

This week our challenge is to write about an unusual name. I decided to tackle someone in my database where I have no surname but I do have a first name. One of the most unusual names in my database is Drady. I do not know much about her, so I’ll tell you what I know and maybe ideas will come to mind for future research.

What I Know
I have her in one census record from Salacoa, Cherokee County, Georgia.[1]

Hutson, Peter, 59, male, laborer (no values listed), Georgia
             Drady, 67, female, Georgia
             Alice, 15, female, Georgia

Next door was someone who could be a son of Peter: Robert Hutson.[2]

Hutson, Robert, 39, Male, laborer, (no prop/pers values), b. Georgia        
             Amanda, 32, Female, Georgia       
             Thos,13, Male, Georgia      
             Asberry, 11, Male, Georgia       
             Peter, 7, Male, Georgia       
             Margarett, 4, Female, Georgia

1860 U.S. census, Cherokee Co., Georgia, Sallocoa, p. 916, dwelling 1839, family 1949, Peter Hutson, digital image, Ancestry
(http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 4 Apr 2011), citing NARA M653, roll 116.
But who is Drady? Although she is 8 years older than Peter, she could have been his wife. They have the same surname, but she could also be his older sister. The 1860 census doesn’t give relationships. Both Peter and Drady are old enough be have been Robert’s parents. However, Drady might be too old  at 52, to be the parent of Alice. Could Alice actually be a granddaughter or niece?

Robert appeared in the 1850 census in Chattooga County, Georgia.[3]

Hutson  Robert   27   Male  farmer   Georgia  
              Amanda   24  Female  Georgia  
              Alexander   5  Male  Georgia  
              Thomas   3  Male  Georgia   
              Robert T   2  Male  Georgia
  
But Peter and Drady have not been found yet in any county in Georgia in 1850.

I did find a Peter Hutson in Newton County, Georgia in the 1840 census.[4] The make-up of his household was: one male 10-15, one male 15 to 20, and one male 30-40. And for females: one under 5, two 5-10, 1 10 to 15, 1 30-40. If I list these in rows and place possible members:

one male 10-15
one male 15 to 20        Robert?
one male 30-40            Peter, b. about 1801
one female under 5
two females 5-10
one females 10 to 15
one female 30-40        unknown wife? However, Drady, b. about 1793, is too old for this slot

There were other Hutson households in Newton County: Archibald Hutson household had a male in the 50 to 60 age range in 1840. He is someone to study further. Jethro Hutson was in the 30 to 40 age range in the same year, making him a rival of Peter.

In 1830 in Newton County, there were several Hudson/Hutson families: Archaba, Thomas, and two Peter Hudson. More work is needed to study these Newton County Hutsons.

Researching
However, before tackling Newton County, records in Cherokee County should be checked. Did Peter have land? Was there a probate file for him there? Are there tax records?

There was a fire in the courthouse in 1864. Early probate and marriage records were lost but the land/deed records were not.  I searched the following probate records:
  • Cherokee Co, GA, Wills & Bonds, Book B, 1847-1866, no Hutson
  • Cherokee Co, GA Records of Wills, Book C, 1866-1921. no Hutson but I found:
  • Samuel J Houston on p. 100 (1877, wife Margaret & daughter; probably not my Hutson)
  • Franklin Houston p 127 (wife Mary M, son Samuel, dau Sarah E; probably not my Hutson)

So I need to continue, by checking deeds, though the census mentioned no real estate values, tax records, and military records. More to follow…but when researching a woman, one needs to research the men in her life.




[1] 1860 U.S. census, Cherokee Co., Georgia, Sallocoa, p. 916, dwelling 1839, family 1949, Peter Hutson, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 4 Apr 2011), citing NARA M653, roll 116.
[2] 1860 U.S. census, Cherokee Co., Georgia, Sallocoa, p. 916, dwelling 1840, family 1950, Robert Hutson, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 4 Apr 2011), citing NARA M653, roll 116.
[3] 1850 U.S. census, Chattooga Co., Georgia, p. 787, 394 (stamped), dwelling 5, family 5, Robert Hutson, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 4 Apr 2011), citing NARA  M432, roll 64.
[4] 1840 U.S. census, Newton Co, Georgia, pop. sched, dist. 461, p. 26, Peter Hutson, NARA M704.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 14, 2019

SLIG 2019 Post #1

It's the second week in January, and that means I'm in Salt Lake City to attend the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG). It's always a fun week co-mingling with other like-minded genealogists from all over the US and from several countries.

I'm happy that it was not snowing when my plane landed on Sunday afternoon. The weather is cold, but so far dry. There is some inversion and the air quality is not perfect, but we stay indoors most of the day.

I'm taking Advanced Southern Research from J. Mark Lowe, along with additional instructors of Anne Gillespie Mitchell, Deborah A Abbott, Kelvin L. Meyers, and Ari Wilkins. This is going to be a great class with wonderful instructors.

My mother's entire ancestry is southern. I have found family in the states Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. I have not gotten back far enough yet to know their origins, but likely they have been here in the U.S. before the Revolution. However, southern research can be tough because of the lack of the kinds of records available in New England. I have many tough problems I want to solve and I hope I get some tips to help me overcome my obstacles.

Already, our homework concerning  cluster research has given me ideas. And the lecture today on physiographic maps might help me with clues to where in Alabama one family was before arriving in Mississippi.

Come on--I'm ready for more hints!



Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 7-13, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
I went to the California Genealogical Society’s library twice this week. On Thursday, our Intro Class committee met to view Ron’s talk on organization. It was a little long and we made some suggestions on where to cut. One Friday, I worked the Desk Duty slot and had one volunteer come in and one researcher. I helped her at the computer, showing her some newspaper sites she didn’t know about. Both trips were by BART and I got some reading in—yeah!

I worked more on analyzing the Johnstons and neighbors in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. My 52 Ancestors post was about the process I’m using.

Sunday, I left for Salt Lake City, for a week of study on Advanced Southern Research. It will be great seeing all my friends and colleagues! The weather doesn’t look too bad. I can handle the 30s and 40s. There was entertainment the first night and we watched some Native Americans dance and then they encouraged us to dance, too! What fun!




Blog Writing: I wrote the following blog posts this week:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended
  • I participated in DearMyrtle’s American Gen Study Group and we discussed probate records, especially wills. I spoke about how to find these records on Ancestry, FamilySearch, and local courthouses.
  • I listened to the "Mondays With Myrt" and the recording is here.
  •  “Maintaining An Organized Computer,” by Cyndi Ingle on Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
  • Lisa Alzo and Jennifer Holik had a joint webinar on writing, and on researching when the archives are closed. Both parts were very good.

Other Activities
In visiting family, my daughter, Elizabeth and I had dinner with her cousin, Maddy, and her mother, Ozzie. We met in Sacramento and had a great dinner, eating delicious food. Conversation was interesting and it was good seeing Maddy before she heads back to Colorado for school.



My German conversation class started this week on Wednesday and we have some need students, making the class larger than usual. I volunteered to speak first and spoke about becoming a Certified Genealogist.

The Contra Costa County Historical Society had their Annual Meeting on Saturday. The meal was delicious and the speaker about building the Trans-continental Railroad was entertaining. I donated genealogy research time as a raffle prize. At the quick board meeting afterwards, I became the Secretary for the upcoming year (or two).


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Where Were They 150 Years Ago?

Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1)  Determine where your ancestral families were on 12 January 1869 - 150 years ago.

2)  List them, their family members, their birth years, and their residence location (as close as possible).  Do you have a photograph of their residence, and does the residence still exist?  How many do you have in each generation living in January 1869?

3)  Tell us all about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a Facebook Status  post
.


We last did a post like this in 2016. I have updated my post to include where the same people were in 1869. Only one of my ancestors had died in the three years. The blue shading indicates my paternal line and the pink my maternal line.

Name
Relationship
Birthdate
Location in 1866
Location in 1869
Johan Anton Hork
Great grandfather
9 Nov 1843
Oberhundem, Kreis Olpe, Westfalen
Same
Julia Ann Sievert
Great grandmother
31 Oct 1854
Joliet, Will Co, Illinois
Same
John H Sullivan
Great grandfather
20 Jun 1854
Co Cork, Ireland?
Unknown
Anna Marie Gleeson
Great grandmother
13 Feb 1860
Richmond, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada
Same
Maria Catharine Troesster Hork
2x-great grandmother
25 Dec 1813
Oberhundem, Kreis Olpe, Westfalen, Prussia
Same
Vincent Sievert
2x-great grandfather
24 Jan 1823
Joliet, Will Co, Illinois
Same
Susanna Raduntz Sievert
2x-great grandmother
1832
Joliet, Will Co, Illinois
Same
Jeremiah Sullivan
2x-great grandfather
1811
Co Cork, Ireland?
Houghton Co, MI
Mary Sheehan Sullivan
2x-great grandmother
1822
Co Cork, Ireland?
Houghton Co, MI
John Gleeson
2x-great grandfather
25 Feb 1825
Richmond, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada
Same
Margaret Tierney Gleeson
2x-great grandmother
24 Apr 1835
Richmond, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada
Same
John Tierney
2x-great -grandfather
1804
Fallowfield, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada
Same
Ann Murray Tierney
2x-great -grandmother
1813
Fallowfield, Carleton Co, Ontario, Canada
Same
Reuben M Johnston
2x-great -grandfather
18 Apr 1841
Titan Co, Texas
Same
Olivia J Jones Johnston
2x-great -grandmother
22 Feb 1859
Titan Co, Texas
Same
Peter H Hutson
2x-great -grandfather
22 Dec 1853
Alabama? Texas?
unknown
Sarah H Selman Hutson
2x-great-grandmother
27 Sep 1858
Cherokee Co, Texas
Same
Ebenezer Loveless
2x-great -grandfather
8 Feb 1851
Chattooga Co, Georgia
Same
Eliza A Rodgers Loveless
3x great grandmother
May 1854
Chattooga Co, Georgia
Same
George W Lancaster
3x great grandfather
3 Apr 1839
Kaufman Co, Texas
Same
Martha J Polly Lancaster
3x great grandmother
Aug 1855
Montague Co or Kaufman Co, Texas
Kaufman Co, TX
Ellis W. Lancaster
4x great grandfather
7 Jul 1808
Kaufman Co, Texas
deceased
Elizabeth S Neel Lancaster
4x great grandmother
22 Mar 1811
Kaufman Co, Texas
Same
Nathan H Polly
4x great grandfather
27 Jan 1820
Montague Co or Kaufman Co, Texas
Kaufman Co, TX
Lydia M. [-?-]
4x great grandmother
24 Feb 1828
Montague Co or Kaufman Co, Texas
unknown
James M. Coor
3x great grandfather
18 Oct 1833
Copiah Co, Mississippi
Same
Melissa A Welch Coor
3x great grandmother
8 May 1840
Copiah Co, Mississippi
Same
Jesse Loveless
3x great grandfather
30 Nov 1806
Chattooga Co, Georgia
Same
Elizabeth Nixon Loveless
3x great grandmother
1810
Chattooga Co, Georgia
Same
Rebecca Waddell Rodgers
3x great grandmother
1820
Chattooga Co, Georgia
Same
Ann Kethley Coor
4x great grandmother
1792
Copiah Co, Mississippi
Same


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, January 9, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 2: Finding Samuel Johnston Challenge

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I have been working on this brick wall for many years. A blog post from 23 January 2014, sums up what I knew about the family.

Since that post, I’ve collected tax and land records for Samuel in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. By figuring out who his neighbors were, I might discover where he was previously before Mississippi. His children were born in Alabama, but I have no idea yet which county.

Here is the land mapped out for Samuel and his neighbors. He purchased his piece of land from Isaac Pearson/Person on 31 March 1856.[1] In the 1854 tax list, his neighbors were listed using the description of their land.[2]


So what I’m doing now is creating a neighborhood to find families to research. One way is to record the ten families listed before Samuel in the 1850 census and ten families after him. I’m using a spreadsheet and did the list for the 1860 census as well. One key could be families who also have children born in Alabama in the 1840s, just as the children of Samuel and Elizabeth Johnston. Perhaps they came from the same location.


The reason to expand this study is families were tied together in kinship, either by blood or some other way. It made traveling to new places safer. Working together gave them a chance to succeed. It is likely that neighbors who live near him could be kin, but kin with surnames I’m not familiar with yet.

This next week, I’m attending the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy taking the Advanced Southern Research course. Our pre-class homework was to do this community study, creating the spreadsheet of the census records and beginning the process to research Samuel’s FAN club.* I’m looking forward to learning some techniques to help me with this challenge.



[1] Mississippi, Yalobusha Co Deeds, Bk P, p 638, J.O. Pearson to Samuel Johnston, FHL film 891096.
[2] "Mississippi State Archives, Various Records, 1820-1951," Yalobusha Co, County Tax Rolls 1854, Box 3964, p 57, Saml Johnson, digital image, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org), FHL digital 4857892.
* FAN club (Friends, Associates & Neighbors) was coineded by Elizabeth Shown Mills.


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 7, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of December 31, 2018—January 6, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
I continued working on deed records for the Lancaster family, getting the deeds in Erath County, first by recording the deeds from the grantee and grantor indexes so I have a full record, and beginning to collect the actual deeds. I ran out time and will continue the next time I’m at the Oakland FamilySearch Library later this month. These records are not available from home.

I found more ship arrival records for Thomas N. Davey, the son of my husband’s 2x-great-grandfather, who lived in Joplin, Missouri. I was surprised by the number of times he visited England. I wish I knew which family members he visited.

I also worked on the homework for the American Genealogy Study Group with DearMyrtle which we will have on Wednesday. These chapters concern probate.

Blog Writing: I wrote the following blog posts this week:
  • Week 1: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks begins with a new post for the new year, about my first genealogy road trip to Stephenville, Texas with my grandmother.
  • Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: discussing last year’s best find(s) and our research goals for 2019.
  • I wrote about my adventures in abstracting multiple deeds for my 3x-great-grandfather, George W. Lancaster, which gave me clues to his residences between Rockwall County, Texas and Mariposa County, Arizona that I would have never known without reading this deeds.

Webinars/Study Groups Attended
“DNA Rights and Wrongs: The Ethical Side of Testing” by Judy G. Russell for Family Tree Webinars.

Other Activities
On New Year’s Day, I went on a hike with friends, Jamie, Elaine, and Phred, to the Crockett Hills Regional Park. Not much was blooming but the views from the hill tops of the Carquinez Straits, Napa River, and San Pablo Bay, were spectacular. It was great starting the new year outdoors.


I did some bird watching at Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek. I walked around the almost natural pond and took some photos of interesting birds which included a ruby-crowned kinglet, a common gallinule, some ring-necked ducks, and double-crested cormorants.



On Saturday, I went with friends to Rush Ranch in Suisun City where we heard a lecture on raptor identification and then walked outdoors looking for raptors. Rush Ranch is part of the Solano County Land Trust and is a wonderful place to walk around. We saw kestrels, red-tailed hawks, white-tailed kites, a barn owl, and northern harriers, among some songbirds. The weather was a bit wet but luckily our walk was between showers. Took a scenic route home, stopping first for It’s-Its ice cream at an outlet store in Suisun City.



 Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.