Wednesday, January 29, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 5: So Far Away – From Westphalia to Wyoming: Johan Anton Hork

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

My great-grandfather, Johannes Anton Hork traveled a long distance in his lifetime. He was born 9 November 1843 in Oberhundem, Kreis Olpe, Westfalen (now Germany) to Joseph Heinrich Horoch and Maria Catherine Trösster.[1] He died 15 August 1906 in Sheridan, Sheridan County, Wyoming. He was sixty-two years old.[2]

He was the fifth child of ten and the fourth son. In early church records, the surname was spelled Horoch or Horock but by the 1870s the name was spelled in records as Hork.

His father was a tailor.  Johan Anton was only fourteen years old when his father and two younger siblings died within days of each other of dysentery in 1857.[3]   

I don’t know much about his life after 1857 until the time he left for America in 1870. He probably worked as a tailor, perhaps having learned the trade from his father before his father’s death.

I believe I have found Johan Anton Hork on a ship list for the SS Idaho, arriving in New York City on 5 November 1870 from Liverpool. The entry doesn’t say much, only:  “no. 213, Joh Hork, 27, male, Germany, USA”[4] He is the right age, and I next find him getting married in 1872.

So how did he get to Liverpool? Europeans often traveled to England, crossed the country by train, and then left from Liverpool. There were several ports from which he could have left: Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam, Le Havre, and more. I did not find him listed on the Hamburg lists. The lists from Bremen were either destroyed due to lack of space or lost during WWII.[5] I will have to investigate the availability of records from the other ports.

The next record I find of Johan Anton is his marriage to Julia Ann Sievert at St. John’s German Catholic Church on 6 June 1872.[6] He gave his age as 28, only a year off. There is also a listing for him in the 1872 Joliet City Directory. He was a merchant tailor. The date indicates that he was living there probably in 1871 when the directory company canvased the town for the directory.

Did he go straight to Joliet from New York? What brought him there? Answers I’ll probably never know.

Below is a map of the states Johan Anton lived in the United States. I suspect that though he might have been a good tailor, he probably did something that necessitate him moving on to a new place.

Numbered in order of residence


They lived in Joliet and had two or three children. They moved sometime before 1876 to Aurora, Kane County, Illinois.[7] By 1880, they had four children.[8]

After that, they moved quite often. City directories document him bouncing around the mid-west. In 1881/82 they were in St. Louis, Missouri.[9] A year later, he was living in Windsor, Ontario, across the river from Detroit.[10] Then next year, he was in Grand Rapids, Michigan.[11]

His children also document their moves. The first five were born in Illinois, either in Joliet or Aurora. The next son was born in Grand Rapids. Then two children were born in Stuart, Guthrie County, Iowa. The next to last child was born in Portland, Oregon, and the youngest child was born in Hamilton, Ravalli County, Montana, where Julia finally put a stop to their moving and she stayed put.

However, Johan Anton did not stay put. He wandered about the west until he ended up in Sheridan, Wyoming, where he died.[12]

That was quite a distance to travel in a life-time. He is probably the ancestor who traveled the farthest.

Distance traveled in the U.S. Need to add the 3800 miles from Germany


[1] Kirchenbuch, 1649-1874, Katholische Kirche Oberhundem (Kr. Olpe), (Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten im Bistumsarchiv Paderborn.Kein Verleih an europische Genealogie-Forschungsstell), Taufen 1826-1847, p 139, Johann Anton Horoch , FHL Intl 1257842.
[2] "The Carbolic Route," The Sheridan (Wyoming) Enterprise, 17 Aug 1906, p 3
[3] Ibid, "Toten 1848-1878," Joseph Heinrich Horoch, 1847, p 33; FHL microfilm 1,257,843, item 3.
[4] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), film 336, 5 Nov 1870, SS Idaho, line 39, no. 213, Joh Hork.
[5] “Bremen Passenger Lists,” Die Maus: Staats Achiv Bremen (http://www.passengerlists.de/).
[6] St. John's Catholic Church, Joliet, Illinois, Marriages, p 13, Anton Hork & Julia Sievert.
[7] Aurora (Illinois) City Court, Final papers, v. 59, old book 4, 26 Oct. 1872-22 Mar. 1888, p. 131, Anthony Hork; FHL dig film 007792617, image 902 of 1355.  
[8] 1880 U.S. census, Kane County, Illinois, pop. sched., Aurora, ED 73, p 43c (penned), p. 79a (stamped), dwelling 280, family 392, Antone Hark, Ancestry (http://ancestry.com); citing NARA T9, roll 217.
[9] St. Louis City Directory, David B. Gould, Publ., 1882, p 561, Anton Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[10] Detroit City Directory, J.W. Weeks & Co, 1883, p 553, Anthony Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[11] Grand Rapids City and Kent County Directory, R.L. Polk & Co, 1885-85, 294, Anton Hork, FHL film 1376887.
[12] "The Carbolic Route," The Sheridan (Wyoming) Enterprise, 17 Aug 1906, p 3.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 20-26, 2020

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
I attended the Thursday night study group and we discussed classes at SLIG and goals for the next year. Our Friday group was cancelled due to too many would be absent.  However, I met with Jacqueline at the Walnut Creek Library and we worked on genealogy and had lunch at The Silk Road.

I attended webinars this week:
  • “New Tools & Ideas for Research,” by Josh Taylor. His beginning about time management was very useful.
  • “Creative Hypothesis Development for Complex Genealogy Problems,” by Jan M Joyce for the BCG webinar. It was very interesting and she asked for audience participation a couple of times during the webinar for a unique approach.

Client Work:
I had no regular client work. I presented to the San Mateo County Genealogical Society (SMCGS) on Saturday, “Offline Research.” I was a substitute and the house was pretty full. I think it was well-received.

Big crowd at the SMCGS meeting

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center, I continued working on the collection about campaign literature from the 60s-90s.

Signups for the California Genealogical Society’s research trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City in May that I'm leading is filling up fast. I have one and half rooms left. Wow! We had to adjust the Eventbrite sign up site to not be overbooked!

Own Work:
I continued working on preparing new lectures for the Adult School course which begins Feb 6. I have finished the census class (at least put it to rest to review in a week), and started on the Organization class. The last one will be records documenting death. It shouldn’t be too hard to do, plus it will be taught the last week, so if I don’t get to it before the start, I’ll still have time.

I also put together a Shutterfly book about our last trip to New York City in December.

Other:
I attended the play, “Glass Menagerie” at the Campbell Theater with three friends, Jamie, Elaine, and Dorrie. It was my first time seeing the Tennessee Williams’ play and the actors were all very good.

German on Monday nights started up again on Monday and I drove Nancy and Margo to class. We spent most of the time discussing our Christmas vacations.

Narcissus flowers are blooming in our yard. The weather has warmed up some and soon fruit trees will begin budding. I need to get some wildflower seeds out soon.



Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Favorite Toys as a Child

Calling All Genea-Musing Fans!

It's Saturday Night again --

Time for some Genealogy Fun!!


Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has our weekly assignment:

1) Jen on Auntie Jen's Family Trees posted "Throwback Thursday Favorite Toys" on 23 January, and Linda S. thought it would make a good SNGF topic. I agree!

2) What are some (one or more) of the toys you played with as a child?

3) Share your favorite toy(s) with us in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or in a Facebook message. Please leave a comment on this blog noting where your conjectures are located.

Here is my post today:

Back in 2014, I followed a meme called "The Book of Me" created by Julie Goucher. We had lots of themes to write about and one of them was Toys & Games.

I see no sense in repeating that theme, so you can check out that link here. I hope Randy doesn't mind!

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, January 24, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 4: Close to Home – Nana Lived Near Us

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

When we lived on East 9th Street, in Pittsburg, California, in the late 50s and early 60s, my dad’s mother lived across the street and down the block some. As children, we thought it was grand to have Nana so close. She had been a school teacher and we loved it when she read to us or taught us cute little songs.

She lived on the east side of a duplex. It had just three rooms: living, kitchen, and bedroom, and a bathroom. In the living room there was a murphy bed. I was always amazed by a bed that folded out of the wall! It was a fun place to spend the night, but I was a little worried about it springing back into the wall while we slept.

Also in the living room was a bookcase with children’s books and school readers left over from at Williams School in Concord, where she taught. It was in the living room where we would sit around her and listen to her read. When we got old enough, we’d sit in her chair and read from the readers ourselves.

The kitchen was small. I don’t remember many details, but she would give us a treat: sugar wrapped in lettuce leaves. Heaven forbid now, but then it was maybe her way to get us to eat vegetables.

Now, I’m not sure how my mother felt about Nana living so close. I wonder how often Nana might have expressed her opinion about the way Mom did things (or didn’t do things Nana’s way). It probably was helpful being able to send one or two of us down to Nana’s house, so Mom could get some peace. There were four of us by then, with the youngest having been born in 1960.

Then there was my dad. He had been the baby of the family and maybe still a bit of a mama’s boy when he got married. I was pretty young when we moved to Walnut Creek and don’t remember exactly the dynamics between Dad and Nana. She ended up leaving Pittsburg and moving to Burlingame, I think, to be closer to her daughters.


Nana would still come to visit and stay with us a few days. She drove a black Volkswagen, made in the 50s with an oval back window. We loved that car and would fight over who got to sit in the cubby way back. She came to stay with us when our parents would take a short trip to Tahoe, and the two times our baby sisters were born. We also went to visit her, especially when she got too old to drive. Her apartment in San Mateo butted up to the public park and we had family picnics there.

Nana with the first 5 grandchildren. I'm sitting on her lap.


Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 13-19, 2020

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:
  • 9th Blogiversary! I’m celebrating my ninth anniversary of starting my first blog.


Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
I met with the Monday Morning group of the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society, where we shared what we had been doing the past month with our genealogy. Gluten-free pancakes were a treat for me at IHOP. I also met with the Friday certification study group for a short time.

I attended one webinar:
  • “Discovering Minister Isaac Steele & His Family Using Land Records and Manuscripts” by J Mark Lowe for Florida State Genealogical Society. Mark has a great voice and wonder tales on finding interesting tidbits.

Client Work:
None.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center, I started on a new collection to process—full of campaign literature from the 60s-90s.

Wednesday, I worked at the Oakland FamilySearch Library. Very quiet there that evening, so I scanned a bunch of slides I took in England in 1976.

Own Work:
I have been working hard this week on preparing new lectures for the Adult School course which begins Feb 6. I am condensing and adding exercises to an older census course I had created for CGS many years ago. Next, I will work on the Death Records and Organization classes.

Other:
The Coast Division of the Pacific Coast Region of the National Model Railroad Association had a board of operations meeting. There were so few there, that not much business was conducted. Also this past weekend, our Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society had an open house/show for the public. I operated mostly in the cabs.

Friday, I had a late Christmas get-together with my long-time friend, Beth. We met at The Habit for burgers, fries, and a shake, exchanged gifts, and then walked around Broadway Shopping Center, mostly window-shopping. It’s what we used to do when in high school, meeting there on Saturdays to buy candy and books and check out the stores. The shopping center looks nothing like it did back in the day – only Nordstrom and Macy are still there.

Art fun in Walnut Creek

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Where Were Your Ancestral Families in the 1950 US Census?

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!



Here is our assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing:

1)   The 1950 United States Census release to the public is just over two years away (on 1 April 2022). 

2)   Who in your ancestral families will be in the 1950 census?  Where will they be residing,  What occupations will they have?  The official "date" was 1 April 1950.

3)  Share your conjectures with us in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or in a Facebook message.  Please leave a comment on this blog noting where your conjectures are located.

Here's mine:

I wasn’t born yet and neither of my parents were married, so they were living with their parents.

1.  My father, William J. Hork, was living with his mother, Anne M. Sullivan Hork, in Concord, Contra Costa County, California. He would have been 19, almost 20, as his birthday would be April 23rd. He and his mother had moved to Concord the previous September when she took a new job as first grade teacher at Williams Elementary School.[1] Their address was 2739 Sinclair Ave.[2] My father might have worked at a service station.

2.  My mother, Lela Nell Johnston, was either still living in Walnut Creek at a rural address with her parents, Tom J & Pansy Lancaster Johnston, or her parents had already purchased the 307 Nancy Lane home in Pleasant Hill by the census date. I heard stories that she attended Acalanes High School her first two years and transferred to Mt. Diablo High School her final two years, which would have been Fall 1950 and 1951. My mother was a student. Tom may have been a carpenter, pool hall owner, or taxi driver. It will be nice to see which.

3. So the above two items covered my paternal grandmother and maternal grandparents. My paternal grandfather, William Cyril Hork, was living in Los Angeles. A voter registration had him living at the National Military Home in Precinct no. 3 in 1950.[3] He probably had no occupation.

4.  No other paternal ancestors were alive in 1950.

5. Tom J. Johnston’s father, Thomas Newton Johnston, was living in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas. His mother, Nell, was deceased. Thomas was probably retired, but did work as a manager at a lumberyard.

6.  Pansy L. Lancaster Johnston’s parents, George Warren Lancaster & Lela Ann Loveless Lancaster, were living in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas. I have no idea what work Warren did. in 1940 he was an auto mechanic.

7.  No other ancestors were alive in 1950. However, my paternal grandmother, Anne, had two aunts who were still living: Helena M. Gleeson and Mary Martha Gleeson Gilbert. Both were living in Los Angeles at 829 So. Lake Street.[4]

8.  The following siblings of my grandparents were:
  • R. D. Lancaster, age 30, worked in the Air Force, so could be stationed anywhere….
  • Wayne Lancaster, age 23, probably still in college. Could be listed at home with parents.
  • Beryl Johnston, age 40/41, not sure. In 1948-Jan 1950, she was in Greece for certain. Not sure when she returned
  • Mildred A. Bay, age 39, not sure. Married Isaac Florace Bay in 1931. (I don’t have the 1940 census—to do list!).
  • Hal Wayne Johnston, age 35, Walnut Creek, Contra Costa Co, California
  • Luther E. Johnston, age 32, perhaps in California, perhaps in Texas.
  • Ida M. Hork Colmann, age 75, living in Hamilton, Ravalli Co, Montana
  • Carrie M. Hork, age 69, living in Hamilton, Ravalli Co, Montana
  • Frank W. Hork, age 66, living in Warm Springs, Deer Lodge Co, Montana at the Montana State Hospital. The 1940 census did not list the inmates, only the employees.
  • Anthony Hork, age 64, Hamilton, Ravalli Co, Montana, was the Clerk and Recorder for the county, but not sure when he retired.
  • Ursula C. Hork Schwalen, age 58, 1110 N 8th Street, Tacoma, Pierce Co, Washington with her husband, Bernard, and children.
  • Helena M Sullivan Goe, age 67, living at 710 Hickory, Anaconda, Deer Lodge Co, Montana.
  • Loretto M. Sullivan Patterson, age 65, living at 554 Randolph, Pomona, Los Angeles Co, California
  • John “Jack” C. Sullivan, age 63, living at 2903 Seine Ave, Artesia, Los Angeles Co, California, electrician perhaps

9. The following siblings of my parents:
  • My mother was an only child, so no siblings
  • Lorene Hork, 27, either still in Napa, or perhaps in San Francisco.
  • Virginia Hork, 25, perhaps with mother in Concord, or living in Los Angeles, as she was a stewardess. She married in Aug of 1950
  • June Hork, 23, with her husband Eugene F. Soares, address unknown, perhaps in Concord, or in San Mateo County, California.
I can’t wait until we have access to the 1950 census and can begin looking for the above relatives!



[1] "Williams School Enrollment", Contra Costa Gazette, Martinez, California, 1 Sep 1949, mentions Mrs. Ann Hork,  clippings/newspaper held by the Contra Costa County Historical Society History Center, Martinez, California.
[2] Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. Contra Costa County, California, 1949, p. unk, Anne M. Hork.
[3] "California Voter Registration 1900-1968," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), 1950, Los Angeles Co, roll 78, Prec 3, National Military Home, William C Hork; 1950, Roll 85.
[4] Helena’s death certificate stated she died at home. I am guessing that Martha was living with her, as she was in 1942, the last directory found for them.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of January 6-12, 2020

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
I met with three study groups this week. Monday was the first of 12 monthly sessions in Cari Taplin’s National Genealogical Society Quarterly study group. We introduced ourselves and learned how the program would work. I’m looking forward to it. I already knew about a half a dozen other participants. Thursday evening I was late meeting with Kim, Linda and Kathryn.  Friday, four of us checked in with our past week’s activities.

I attended one webinar:
  • “Mistakes I have Made: Confessions of a Repentant Genealogist” by Chri Hudson Passey for Legacy Family Tree Webinar. Her presentation was full of mistakes she (and many of us) made when she first started genealogy, along with excellent solutions.

Client Work:
I presented “Researching Offline” to the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society.

Volunteer Work:
Returned to the History Center on Tuesday, where I did some catch-up on correspondence received over the break. I hope to get back to the finding aid and processing of collections that have arrived. A big one to do is the Pleasant Hill Historical Society’s records.

Friday, I worked the desk at the California Genealogical Society’s library. No patrons came in, which made for a quiet day. I got some writing done!

Saturday, the historical society held their annual meeting/luncheon. Eddie Hart, an Olympian runner was the speaker. We arrived early to set-up and I helped clean-up afterwards. It was a great meeting, if only attended by about forty.

Own Work:
On Monday, I met with Jacqueline at the Walnut Creek library where we worked on our own genealogy projects and had lunch together. I finished up the flyer of the list of my presentations and sent them out to several local genealogical societies. Hopefully I will hear back from some of them.

Other:
Our 2021 convention meeting for the National Model Railroad Association was held at the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society club room. We are making progress, but still need a registrar. I am the secretary and that job is enough for me right now.

Had a wonderful time celebrating my friend, Phred’s birthday on Sunday by sharing some ice cream.




Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Accentuate the Positive Geneameme 2019

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along - cue the Mission Impossible music!):

1)  Jill Ball reconstituted her "Accentuate the Positive Geneameme 2019" on 30 December 2019 and invited readers to participated. 

2)  This week, let's contribute our answers to her questions about our genealogy accomplishments in 2019.  Copy the questions below, and add your own responses.

3)  Share your responses on your own blog, in comments on this blog, or on Facebook.  Please leave a comment on this post so readers can find your post, and please let Jill know about your efforts by emailing her at jillballau@gmail.com.


Here's mine:

1.  An elusive ancestor I found was:
I could not find my husband’s Davey family ship arrival records, but one day focused on the youngest child in their family, and lo and behold, I found her with her siblings and mother under a strange, but almost like surname of her mother.  See the post here.

2.  A great newspaper article I found was:
I found two newspaper articles mentioning that my great-grandmother, Julia (Sievert) Hork visited her mother, Mrs. V. Sievert (Susana Radunz) of Hickory Street.[1] I was pretty excited. Julia had moved west after marrying Johan A. Hork, and I figured she never saw her mother again. Oh how happy I was to find that she had.

3.  A geneajourney I took was:
I did a half of day of research at the NARA in St. Louis, obtaining records for my aunt, Virginia, who had worked for the federal government on Mare Island during World War II; for my grandfather, William Cyril Hork, who worked for the WPA in Ontario, California; for Arnold Nilsen, who worked for the CCC in Yosemite; and looked at Morning Reports of Co E of the 8th Engineers during World War I for my great-uncle, John Cyril Sullivan.  Also, while in Clinton, Iowa during our Mississippi River boat cruise, I did some research at the historical society, researching which Catholic church the Gleeson family would have attended. 

4.  I locate an important record:
See numbers 1 and 3 above.

5.  A newly found family member shared:
Information about the DAVEY and HOCKING family in Cornwall from Robyn Dally. Her ancestor, who emigrated to Australia was the sibling of my husband’s ancestor. 

6.  A geneasurprise I received was:
62 pages of court records of a suit my husband’s grandfather, Joseph Norman Gorrell, was involved in.

7.   My 2019 social media post that I was particularly proud of was:
Most of the posts I do on Facebook are either photos of birds and plants that I take, links to some of my blog posts, or share posts that I think are interesting (which I don’t do often). My most-liked posts are photos of birds.

8.   I made a new genimate who:
I made two new friends when attending the Professional Management Conference (PMC) of the Association of Professional Genealogist (APG) last September in Salt Lake City. I volunteered to be a mentor to a new person and ended up having loads of fun with two new people: Robin & Francesca.

9.  A new piece of technology or skill I mastered was:
I am a regular attendee at Webinars, especially Legacy Family Tree Webinars, but also APG, APG Writers SIG, the VGA, Florida Genealogical Society, and others. I’m sure I learned something from each of them, but can’t remember anything that stands out. One I enjoyed immensely was J. Mark Lowe’s webinar, “Basics of Land Platting - Part I” because it had practice exercises.

10. I joined:
The Texas State Genealogical Society.

11. A genealogy education session or event from which I learnt something new was:
I learned lots of new things this past year in two institute classes. I learned to make better use of cluster research in the Advanced Southern Research class at SLIG, and I learned quite a few tips in working on tough research problems in the class at GRIP.

12. A blog post that taught me something new was:
“How to find the father of an illegitimate child,” by Yvette Hoitink, CG is especially helpful!

13. A DNA discovery I made was:
I did not actively worked with DNA this past year.

14. I taught a genimate how to:
I taught several multi-class courses this year to intermediate genealogists for the California Genealogical Society and at the Acalanes Adult School. I also volunteered at the FamilySearch Library in Oakland and helped several people with their research.

15. A brick wall I demolished was:
Again, see no. 1.

16. A great site I visited was:
Purdue Online Writing Lab has great tools to help improve your writing.

17. A new genealogy/history book I enjoyed was:
I purchased How to Find Your Family History in U.S. Church Records by Sunny Jane Morton and Harold A. Henderson, CG. I haven’t had a chance to study it thoroughly, but will soon to help with my church records class.

18. It was exciting to finally meet:
Helen Smith from Australia. She was at SLIG last January. It took several attempts during the breaks to find her!

19. I am excited for 2020 because:
Because I have made goals that I am determined to meet.  See this post for details.

20. Another positive I would like to share is ...
I am thankful that I have time most days to work on my genealogy. Even though I am not disciplined to keep good track of that research, I know that I have saved the images, entered the information in RootsMagic, and have a good source citation. I want to work on recording what I have researched so I can see a timeline of what I have found.




[1] “Personals,” The Joliet Evening Herald-News, 18 July 1906, p. 3 and 20 Sept 1906, p. 5; both on Newspapers.com.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, January 10, 2020

52 Ancestors (2020) – Week 2: Favorite Photo

This is my third year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.


This is a tough one, as I have many favorite photos. I have shared some of them in the past on this blog but probably didn’t identify them as a favorite photo.

This photo of my two grandmothers doting on the newborn baby (me) is a favorite of mine. This photo shows both grandmothers, Pansy (Lancaster) Johnston on the left, and Anne (Sullivan) Hork on the right. They both look like they are proud grandmothers.

I think the photo was taken at my parent’s house (35 Wharf Dr, West Pittsburg), probably late March 1954, though it is possible that it was taken at Pansy’s home (307 Nancy Lane, Pleasant Hill). The amount of items on the wall point more to my parent’s home and the metal plate looks familiar to me. The coffee table, end table, and lamp were probably made by my grandfather, Tom J. Johnston. He made a lot of furniture in his home wood shop.

My mother liked early American furniture when they first married, and I think it was popular then. You can see the same type of furniture on the hour-long old I Love Lucy shows which aired in the 50s. I recognize also the ashtray and cigarette lighter on the table, but not the ceramic deer. I’m sure by the time I was old enough to walk, those pretty things were put up high or put away.

Pansy was called “Mam-ma”  by her grandchildren and Anne was called “Nana.” Nana, born in 1892, was old enough to be Mam-ma’s mother and I was her fifth grandchild, through her youngest child, Bill. She had been thirty when she married my grandfather, William Cyril Hork in 1922. Mam-ma was just forty years old when I was born and my mother, nineteen. It is too bad that my mother wasn’t also in the photo, as we could have had a three-generation photo. I do have a four-generation photo when my oldest daughter was baptized in 1989.

Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of Dec 31, 2019—Jan 5, 2020

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

 Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
I met with both of my study groups this week. It was great that all of the Thursday evening group were present. In Friday's group we continued discussing our goals. It was great being able to meet with my genealogy friends online.

Client Work:
During the week, I received calls from two local genealogical societies who needed last-minute speakers, so I have agreed to do that. The first one will be this coming week. Sunday, I spoke about city directories at the Sacramento Public Library.

I also met with a potential client, but after the consultation, I gave her possible contacts to further help her DNA problem. I just don’t have the experience in using DNA to help her. It is an interesting story and I hope she lets me know how it turns out.

Volunteer Work:
Still on hiatus for the holiday break. Can’t wait to get back to it.

Own Work:
Because of the new goals I have made, I spent time working on them. The goals are printed out and posted on my bulletin board above my computer where I can view them daily. I added a 2020 calendar and placed all of the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks prompts on the bulletin board, too. I then worked a flyer of my presentations, creating a few new ones. It’s probably ready to be sent out to genealogical societies. I’ll spend this coming week gathering the contact info for program chairs at the societies in the area. I should probably print up a few to take to the two talks I’m doing this week.

Other:
Saturday, I went bird watching with the Mt. Diablo Audubon Society up to Putah Creek and Solano Park. It was a large group and we saw about seventy different bird species. The expected phainopepla was there but no Lewis woodpeckers. There were quite a few acorn woodpeckers working in the old oaks. At the Lake Berryessa dam, we saw a bald eagle—my first sighting in California. I was pretty excited. I had a great time and got in nearly 10,000 steps on the trip.

We also celebrated December birthdays at our Sisters get-together (which includes nieces, too) on Saturday night. We did our sister Christmas exchange, since we had to postpone the gathering from December. My sister, Sabrina, kept her tree up, so it was very festive. The dinner she fixed was delicious! She and her husband are such great hosts.






Copyright © 2020 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Dec 23-30, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:


Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
Our Friday study group met and we discussed the idea of having written goals and sharing with each other. We decided to check in quarterly to see how we are doing. For many of them, the them of the year is “Finish,” mostly to finish their portfolios. Mine is to do more writing.

Client Work:
None.

Volunteer Work:
All of my volunteer positions took a hiatus for the Christmas break. Will return next week.

Own Work:
I did some clean up, first on my desk and surrounding areas, filing and putting away items not needed. I also worked on cleaning up the Download folder on my computer. I either filed away genealogy files or processed them in RootsMagic before filing. I did some research on the O’Meara and Gleeson families in Iowa: Clinton, Plymouth, and Shelby Counties. Next week, I shall start on the Hork family book.

Other:
Monday, I had a colonoscopy and I got a clear for five years. Christmas was spent with our daughter, Elizabeth coming and staying overnight. We watched Downton Abby and ate potato soup. Thursday, I did the phenology study at the Strentzel Meadow without Shirley. It sure goes faster alone. Friday, the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society had a show and I worked in the cabs. Sunday we visited Norman’s brother, Brian, and visited with his two daughters, Kate and Maddy and Kate’s husband, Will. We had a great time playing trivia and other games.


*This was published late for some reason.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.