Saturday, July 21, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 29: Music

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Who is or was musical in our family?

My daughter, Margaret, plays the piano, sings, and dances, as well as acts. Her favorite music is show tunes. In junior high and high school, she played percussion instruments.





Her grandmother, Thelma, sang in the St. Stephen's Church choir for over fifty years. She also loved classical and opera music. She had such a strong diaphragm from singing that she could blow up air mattress in no time at all.


My father-in-law’s uncle, Fred J. Davey, was a music teacher who played trombone and led the church orchestra and the Odd Fellows band in Springfield, Missouri.





My paternal grandmother, Anna Sullivan, was in her college Glee Club. She later was a school teacher, who probably loved singing with her classes. She taught us lots of fun songs that we sang while washing dishes.

My maternal grandmother’s cousin, Erwin M Loveless, was a musician who played by ear. 

It's nice to see those in the family who had some talent.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 9-15, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Attended Gena Philibert-Ortega’s presentation at the Sacramento Public Library on Sunday about how to use Internet Archive. I have used the site before but picked up a few tips from her today such as getting a library card so I can “check out” books that are not freely downloadable.

Made more progress on my certification portfolio. I returned to the KDP to correct my numbering after reading Warren Bittner’s article in the latest NGS Quarterly, where he showed the numbering system for foreign-born ancestors. We discussed it some during our certification peer group meeting. Examples could be found in the old BCG Standards book. We all got into the classes we wanted for 2019 SLIG.

Flew to San Diego to attend the Team Leader meeting for the International German Genealogy Conference (IGGC) that the Sacramento German Genealogical Society and the German Interest Group of the San Diego Genealogical Society are putting on next June. We made some great progress.

Attended the Monday Morning group where we all shared some genealogy finds. I shared the new book, Researching Like a Pro.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:
  • My 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about my traveling aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron on her half-way around the world trip with three friends.

Other
Outdoors activities included conducting the phenology project at Strentzel Meadow, where we saw two California Quail in the walnut tree. I brought the camera with a telephoto lens and got some shots of the birds.

For sports this week, I woke early to watch most of the matches of the Wimbledon games. Enjoyed both the women’s final and the men’s semi- and final matches. Got to see a little of the final World Cup. Also watched two Giants-A's games on television.

California Quail female

Shield bug eggs and nymphs on a Snowberry plant


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 28: Travel – Lorene’s First Leg of Trip from Tokyo

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Last week I wrote about my aunt, Lorene E. Hork Waldron, who spent a year in Japan working as a civil servant for the U.S. Army in Tokyo. She wrote many letters home to her mother, and two sisters, Virginia, and June. The family saved the letters and they were given to me in two old cloth-bound binders. One about her time in Japan, and the other about her travels west to Europe on her way home with three girlfriends, Anne Ankers, Mitzi Seale, and Donna Oehm.

The first letter was a postcard saying 
“Leaving Tokyo Aug 31. Arrive Bangkok approximately 25 Sept. Write there c/o American Express. Letter following. SIG: Lorene.”
She sailed on a freighter that loaded freight at Osaka, Kobe, Moji before leaving for Formosa, Manila, and Hong Kong, and finally arriving in Bangkok.

She wrote of the nineteen passengers on the Hermod. Besides she and her girlfriends, the only other Americans were two Presbyterian missionaries on their way to Formosa. The crew was Chinese.



One thing she wrote to her mother, 
“We all realize we’ve never had it so good and I wish so much that you [her mother] could enjoy this wonderful trip. The sea is so calm, the water such a beautiful color of blue, the sunsets are gorgeous…”
An Army news correspondent came on board just before they departed Japan to interview the four girls, who he heard were making a trip around the world. Another reporter, Robert J. Dunphy, caught up with them in Europe and an article was published in Stars and Stripes about their adventure. The start of the article began,
“Four lovely California Belles who took the wrong way home after quitting their Army jobs in Japan have bogged down here—happy but broke—on a trip that has taken them three-fourths of the way around the world. 
“Their adventures included a party with Red Chinese crewmen aboard a ship on the China Sea, a visit to an opium den in Bangkok, robbery by a monkey in India and pursuit by a cobra in Bombay. Also in hot pursuit throughout the journey was a seemingly endless army of suitors. 
“Traveling on a shoestring, the girls hitch hiked rides on desert airlines and went by slow freighter, sampan and camel to cut their costs for the three-month tour to about $700 each.”
It will be intriguing going through the letters telling of their adventures from the viewpoint of my aunt.


To be continued . . .


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.