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Week 37—On the Farm—Amos’ Diaries Gives Us a Taste of Farm Life

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Amos Gorrell, my husband’s paternal great-grandfather, grew up on a farm in Ross County, Ohio. After his Civil War service and marriage to Elizabeth (Livy) Shotts Sayre, they moved to Cooper County, Missouri, where they lived the rest of their lives. See this post about their move. We know the details of that move and what it was like the first few years because Amos kept a yearly journal in a small notebook that fit in his pocket. He kept track of small things: the weather, who he saw, what he purchased, what he planted, and correspondence with friends and family. Many years later, the surviving journals were transcribed and copies of the transcriptions were given to descendants of the six children he and Livy raised. My father-in-law received one of the little books. The entries are short and somewhat cryptic, but reading the entries over a few days paints a picture. Here is weeks’ worth of what he wrote in late May of 1871. Spelling and punctuation is kept as written. Sabba

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of September 5–12, 2021

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I have completed seventy-eight (78) weeks of semi- lock down due to Covid-19. This past week, I left the house to volunteer at the History Center twice, and to do phenology. Genealogy Blog Writing : I wrote two posts this week. 52 Ancestors—Week 36: Work—Fred J. Davey, From Machinist to Musician I wrote about my husband’s great-granduncle’s occupation, both as machinist in early life, and his later work as a musician. Saturday Night Genealogy Fun—20 Years Ago . . .  I wrote about what I remember about 9-11 twenty years ago.  O nline Study Groups & Meetings Attended:   I with my AppGen partners for our weekly planning meeting. Our four Amigos met on Tuesday and heard news from Linda and Stewart. I was late to my peer group on Friday but got in the discussion on chapter 11 in Mastering Genealogical Documentation .   Webinars & Classes Attended : I attended no classes or webinars. Client Work/Presentations :  I presented to the Contra Costa County Genealogical So

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- 20 Years Ago...

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Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: It's  Saturday Night  again - Time for some more  Genealogy Fun!! Here is our assignment Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing : 1)  Today is September 11th, and the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack on the United States.  Where were you, what were you doing, and how did it affect you? 2)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or on Facebook.  Be sure to leave a comment with a link to your blog post on this post. Here's mine: We did not learn of the attacks until we got to work. Johanna and I carpooled and never had the radio on. Instead, we planned out our day as we drove into work at the Hayward Training Center. Once there, someone told us to come into the classroom and see something. They got the video monitor to tune into a local station using rabbit ears and we saw through a very fuzzy screen the first building had been struck, wondering how a plane could make such a horrible mistake. Then we saw the second

Week 35--Work—Fred J Davey: From Machinist to Musician

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Fred James Davey, the great-uncle of my husband, and older brother of his grandmother, Matilda Pearl Davey Gorrell, was born 27 November 1878 in Louisville, Kentucky to Frederick Henry Davey and Matilda “Tillie” Wollenweber. [1] He was the oldest of four and was just eight years old when his mother died in 1885. Not much is known about Fred’s early life until his marriage. He married Laura Hollowell in Joplin, Missouri on 16 March 1898 with his father giving his assent to the marriage. [2] Machinist Two years later, he is found living at 904 Main Street, Joplin, living with his mother-in-law, Medley Hollowell. He worked as a machinist, Fred likely following in his father’s footsteps. [3] Laura had died on 29 Jan 1899. [4] A 1906 directory in Springfield, Missouri, showed he was a machinist with Frisco Systems shops. [5] The same year, he married Alice Christine Pfotenhauer on 19 June in Joplin at the First Christian Church. [6] He continued working as machinist in Springfie

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of August 30–September 4, 2021

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I have completed seventy-seven (77) weeks of semi- lock down due to Covid-19. This past week, I left the house to volunteer at the History Center and the Oakland FamilySearch Library, and do phenology. Genealogy Blog Writing : I wrote two posts this week. My 52 Ancestor post on the McFall actresses was highlighted in the 52 Ancestors’ email this week. 52 Ancestors—Week 35: School—Lela Nell’s School Report Cards Help Tell a Story I wrote about my mother’s report cards from second, fourth, fifth and eighth grades and how they document her family’s moves. Saturday Night Genealogy Fun—What Was Your First Real Job? I wrote about the summer job I had at my high school library.  O nline Study Groups & Meetings Attended:   I met with Jacqueline and we spoke about her past and upcoming motorhome trips. I met with my AppGen partners for our weekly planning meeting. Our four Amigos met on Tuesday and got caught up. I attended the Certification Discussion Group and listened to th

Week 35: School – Lela Nell’s School Report Cards Help Tell a Story

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When my mother, Lela Nell Johnston, was a young child, they moved around a lot due to her father’s job as carpenter before and during World War II. Because of their frequent moves, they don’t appear in city directories. They were enumerated in Stephenville, Erath County, Texas in 1940, living with her mother’s parents, Warren and Lela Lancaster. Lela Nell was five in that census, having not yet turned six that year. [1] In family papers, we have copies of some of her report cards that help fill in that story. I’ll highlight the cards and fill in with additional research I have done. The first report card is for the school year 1941-42 where she was in second grade at Nash School in Fort Worth, Texas. She was in lower second grade and her teacher was S. Moore. I don’t think she was there long. She attended only part of the first semester, fifteen days in the second report and 23 days in the third. [2] The school building still stands in Fort Worth and is called Charles E. Nash Elem