Posts

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of Mar 29-April 4, 2021

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Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme. I have completed fifty-five (55) weeks of semi- “lock down” due to Covid-19. This past week, I went out to shop for greeting cards at CVS, the History Center three times, and to the meadow for phenology. Genealogy Blog Writing : Week 13: Music—Music in Our House Growing Up . I wrote about the different ways we celebrated music in our home from listening to the radio to playing musical instruments. Updated Website . I chose a new template for the "My Trails into the Past" blog so it appears better when using a phone or tablet. I also chose a new template for the "Mam-ma’s Southern Family" blog, here . In both cases, I uploaded my own photo to use as the header and I really like how both blogs look. Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – Google M

Easter Sunday in Past Years

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It's a quiet day in our home this year, however we can hear the Easter Egg hunts in the neighboring houses where young children still live. I thought today I'd share some family photos of Easters past. 1955 at Lisa & Lea at Nana's on Easter 1968 Ready for Church Margaret & Elizabeth at the Mall 1998 Easter at Dad's with extended family Copyright © 2021 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Google Maps of Ancestral Homes

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Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: It's  Saturday Night  again - Time for some more  Genealogy Fun!! Here is our assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing :  1) Identify an ancestral home address ( preferably one with a street address...) for one of your ancestral families (You do know where they lived, don't you? If not, consult the 1900 to 1940 US Census records, or City Directories). 2) Go to Google Maps ( http://maps.google.com ) and enter the street address (and city/town if necessary - usually you can pick from a list) for your selected ancestral home. 3) Look at the street map, the satellite map, and the street view. Zoom in or out, or manipulate the image as you wish. 4) Tell us or show us your map images in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a Facebook Status post. Please leave a link in a comment to this post. 5) Do you have maps and street view pictures for all of your known ancestral homes? Here’s mine: I don’t have many a

Updated Website

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You may notice a change to the look of the blog. I have done this so my content can be viewed better on tablets and smart phones.  I was hesitant, but discovered that I really like this new template. It has a very clean and modern look. Plus, I was able to upload my own photo that really looks like a trail! Let me know what you think! Copyright © 2021 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Week 13: Music – Music in Our House While Growing Up

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This is my fourth year working on this year-long 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways. There was always music playing on the radio. Mom liked listening to the current hits and as a very young child, when we still lived in Pittsburg, California, I remember my mother demonstrating how to do The Twist to my father. She said to “act like you’re putting out a cigarette with your toe while you’re drying off your bottom with a towel, twisting your arms back and forth.” We thought it was great fun trying it out. Later, we moved to Walnut Creek, and our school program in fourth grade taught us to read music using black plastic song flutes they loaned out to us. I don’t remember the details except I wasn’t very good at it. But my brother, Jon and sister, Danna, must have because they

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of Mar 22-28, 2021

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Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme. I have completed fifty-four (54) weeks of semi- “lock down” due to Covid-19. This past week, I went out to the History Center, to Kaiser for my second vaccine shot, and to Lafayette for a walk around the reservoir and dinner for my birthday. Genealogy Blog Writing : Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – “Who Was Your First Ancestor Born in …” . I wrote about both my ancestors and my husband’s ancestors who were first born in the New World. Some were born during colonial times and some were more recent immigrants. Week 12: Loss--John E Lundquist . I wrote about the losses John felt in his lifetime, from death of two wives to the loss of his eye sight and use of his right arm from serving during the Civil War. Online Study Groups & Meetings Attended:  I atten

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- "Who Was Your First Ancestor Born In ..."

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Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: It's  Saturday Night  again - time for some more  Genealogy Fun!! Here is our assignment this week from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings : 1)  Lorine McGinnis Schulze, in her blog post " Who Was Your First Canadian or American Born Ancestor? " asked that question. 2)  Let's broaden it a bit to "Who was your first ancestor born in your chosen county, state, province, or country?" based on your known ancestry. 3)  Put it in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a Facebook post.  Please leave a link in a comment to this post. Here is mine: My mother’s side: Her seventh great-grandfather, John Selman , was born in 1680 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. He married Martha Groce there in 4 December 1707. His parents were John Sellman, born in England, and Elizabeth Brashear, birthplace unknown. I have not personally researched this line. Many online trees cover this line, as well as the book, Over the Mou