Monday, September 23, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Sep 16-22, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing: I was busy with other activities and only got one post in this week.
  • 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: For the “cousins” theme, I showed two photos from our archives of Nilsen cousins and Hork cousins.

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
  • "Civil Law Concepts and Genealogy"—Claire Bettag, Legacy Family Tree Webinars


Conference Attended:
I attended the Association of Professional Genealogists Professional Management Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah held at the RL Hotel from September 22-24, with a pre-conference activities on the 21st. I was a mentor to two first-time attendees, Robyn Buehler and Marybethe Kelly. I also spent time with other first-timers, especially Franchesca Werden.

Robyn, Lisa, & Franchesca
Lisa & Marybethe
My favorite session was when we spent the 75 minutes networking with others in the room. I met two people (Julie & ReNae) who do editing, which will come in handy when I write my next family history. I met David, who lives in Cork City, Ireland, and maybe someday I’ll go to County Cork and hire him to take me around. Got to know Michelle better and learned to submit to NW Genealogy Conference. Janice is willing to do Family History Library film and book look-ups. It was fast-paced and we all wished we could have kept going.

We also learned a lot about the business of genealogy and client work. The speakers were all excellent. I was responsible for bringing out the BCG portfolios, so met a lot of people interested in certification. I had a nice chat with Diana Elder at the ICAPGEN table discussing options about accreditation.

Best of all was the small conference was full of genealogy peers. It was one big hug after another. I can’t wait until next year when it will be in Portland, Oregon.

Members of the California Genealogical Society at the PMC


Own Work:
I worked this week on my article for the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society’s newsletter, Descendants, about researching at the Lafayette Historical Society. It will be out in the October issue. I also saw the proof of my book review for the National Genealogical Society Quarterly that will come out this quarter.

Other:
Got a new phone ordered on Sunday, as my old phone could not be fixed. I’m getting a Google Pixel which works on the Google Fi network I have already been using. I hope it comes soon. It was very difficult not having a phone while in Utah.


I attended the Coast Division (of the National Model Railroad Association) meet on Sunday thanks to Bob picking me up at the airport. The clinics were interesting on modeling scenery, making distressed wood, and using different adhesives. I talked to a lot of people to get information for my first report as Director of Coast Division to the Pacific Coast Region (of the NMRA) board meeting next month. I’m looking forward to serving the division.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, September 20, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 38: Cousins

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Happiness is when all the cousins are together in a photo. My husband’s mother’s cousins are all in this one and it is nicely labeled. They are from the Nilsen Family.




I also have a photo of my cousins taken in our home on the occasion of my sister’s baptism in 1965. My youngest sister wasn’t born yet, so one cousin is missing.



Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, September 16, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Sep 9-15, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
  • Advanced DNA Techniques: Using Phasing to Test DNA Segments—Blaine Bettinger, Legacy Family Tree Webinars


Own Work:
I did not get much work done this week, though I worked on the curriculum for my adult school course. I met with the education coordinator and viewed my classroom, learned how to record roll, operate the projector, and use the copier. I have eighteen students and am looking forward to October 3, my first class.

I have a new part-time position. I'll be doing genealogy research for the woman I had the interview with last week. It's not super steady, which is fine with me. I'll be able to do traveling and other things. 

Other:
All three of my German classes began this week. We might have new students in Nancy’s class on Monday nights. I hope they stay. I shared about my train-boat-auto trip this past summer in the Wednesday class. In Thursday’s class, I could only stay the first hour. It will be good practice to have the three classes.

We visited with daughter, Elizabeth, at the Harvest Festival in Santa Rosa, and then dinner at her restaurant. It was a nice visit and we managed to find some interesting teas at the festival, and ate delicious food at the restaurant.

This weekend was the model railroad show at the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society. I operated most of both days and am feeling very comfortable now with the layout and communicating on the headsets. I know my way most of the time now.

My cell phone died, so no photos this week from my phone. It’s awaiting a new battery at the shop and I hope that fixes it. I’m not looking forward to finding a replacement. The photos below were taken with the ipad, which does not have a very good camera. The shot with Elizabeth is of the full moon. It was almost dark, so no idea why it picked up so much light.






Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

When did the Thomas Davey Family Come to America?

According to the 1886 obituary for Thomas Davey of Jeffersonville, Indiana, the family “came to this country, landing at New York in 1852, and made their home successively at Philadelphia, Reading, Altoona, and prairies of Illinois.”[1] 

On the other hand, he reported on his declaration of intent to naturalize in 1853 that he arrived at the port of New York in June 1850.[2] This date is closer to the date he made his intention as oppose to the obituary some three decades later. The family was enumerated in the 1851 English census in Deptford, London.[3] Why would he say 1850 if he was living in England in 1851? One needed to live in the U.S. for a minimum of two years before applying for the intent to become a citizen. Either he had come earlier and went back to get his family, or he lied to start the naturalization process sooner. 

Their youngest child, Frederick, was born in the United States, 10 Oct 1953 in Reading, Pennsylvania.[4] This supports the arrival between 1851 and 1852.

Searches in New York ship lists no record for Thomas Davey, his wife, Mary, nor any of the possible children: Elizabeth, Susan, Thomas N, Mary Jane, Lydia N, and Catherine Rose.[5]

Yet, the family may have been found. Searching on the child, “Lydia” with no surname and born about 1841 turned up a record for Lydia Nichols born about 1842 on the ship, Ocean Queen,  arriving 12 March 1852.[6] The surname is wrong, but her mother’s maiden name was Nicholas. It was worth a look.



The family was listed as:

Matthew Nichols, 43
Mary Nichols, 40
Elizab Nichols, 19
Susan Nichols, 17
Thomas Nichols, 16
Mary Nichols, 11
Lydia Nichols, 10
Rose Nichols, 2 mos

What works in this listing is the birth order and names of the children and the mother. This is the exact order for the names of the surviving children of Thomas and Mary Davey. The ages are very close to the known birthdates of the children. See chart below.

The conflict is in the surname as recorded and the first name of the head of the family.

Name on Ship List
Age on Ship List as of 3/1852
Date of Birth
Age in 1852 based on birth
Mathew Nichols
43
3 Sep 1807 (Thos Davey)
44
Mary Nichols
40
24 Aug 1811
40
Elizab Nichols
19
5 Jan 1833
19
Susan Nichols
17
11 Aug 1834
17
Thomas Nichols
16
7 Nov 1835
16
Mary Nichols
11
23 May 1839
12
Lydia Nichols
10
1 Apr 1841
10
Rose Nichols
2 mos
27 Jan 1851
2 mos

It is possible that Mary traveled with a family member (brother/cousin) and the names were recorded under that person’s surname. However, there does not appear to be any brother by the name of Matthew. The occupation of most of the people on the list was farmer, though there was one tailor. Thomas Davey was a blacksmith.

If this is the family of Thomas and Mary Davey, how did the names get mixed up? Did Mary give the information and use her maiden name? Was Nicholas mixed up into Nichols? What about Mathew? There was no child named Mathew nor any family member of either side with that name.

Perhaps Mary and children traveled to America with another male and met up with Thomas. Thomas may have arrived in 1850 and his wife and children came in 1852 to meet up with him. If Mary gave the information for the Thomas' obituary, then she would remember arriving in American in 1852. 

What do you think? Has Thomas and Mary's family been found? 



[1] "Thomas Davey," Jeffersonville (Indiana) Daily News, 9 Feb 1886, p. 2, digital image, NewspaperArchive (http://newspaperarchive.com/). Of course the author of the obit is unknown, but likely his wife, who died 7 years later, was the source.
[2] Court of Common Pleas (Berks County), Declaration of Intent, Apr 1852 - Sep 1856, Thomas Davey 1853, FHL film 1403263.
[3] 1851 England Census, Kent, Deptford, St. Nicholas parish, page 5-6, household 24, Thomas Davey; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 May 2012); PRO HO 107/1585, GSU rol 174822, citing The National Archives of UK, London.
[4] Family data, Thomas Davey Family Bible, (Cincinnati, Ohio: Moore, Wilstch, Keyes & Company, 1859); original owned by [address for private use], transcription done by Mary Davey Korn, granddaughter of Thomas Davey.
[5] Searched in Ancestry for combinations of Thomas Davey, Davy, and soundex of Davey in the “New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957.”
[6] “New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957,” Ocean Queen, arriving 12 Mar 1852, 2nd page, lines 18-25, digital image, Ancestry ((http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Aug 2019), citing NARA M237, roll 110.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, September 9, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Sep 2-8, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy

Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
  • Reasonably Exhaustive Research—Elizabeth Shown Mills, Legacy Family Tree Webinars (BCG)
  • Combining DNA & Traditional Research—Michelle Leonard, Legacy Family Tree Webinars

Own Work:
I volunteered at the History Center (CCCHS) where I worked on our finding aid, and at the Oakland FamilySearch Library, where there was no one who needed help, so I worked on my own work.

I had an interview with a women who interviews and writes life stories for clients. She’s looking for a genealogist to do some work on occasional projects. She does beautiful work. I would love to work for her.

From Thursday to Sunday this week, I participated in retreat with three other genealogists. We spent the four days working on our own projects. During meal times we discussed genealogical issues. Sunday night we celebrated our successes by having dinner in town. I worked on developing the curriculum for my genealogy course I’m teaching in October at the Acalanes Adult School. I am about 60 percent finished. It was a successful weekend for all of us!



Other:
I did get in some watching lots of U.S. Open tennis on T.V. in the beginning of the week, but missed it all while at the retreat. I saw a black throated gray warbler in the trees around the house at the retreat, but since I don’t have my life list with me, I’m not sure if it’s a new bird. But I am proud I figured it out on my own!

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, September 8, 2019

Lydia Davey Colby Has Been Found!

The final whereabouts of my husband’s great-grandfather’s sister, Lydia Nicholas Davey, was unknown until now.

What Was Known
She was born 1 April 1841 in Bristol, England.[1] The family was living in Bedminster Parish of Bristol in 1841 and the two youngest children of Thomas Davey and Mary Nicholas, including Lydia, were born in the county.[2]

By 1851, her family were living in London in the Burrough of Greenwich.[3] Sometime before 1854, the family had arrived in the United States. She was baptized at St. Peter’s Methodist Church in Reading, Pennsylvania on 12 March 1854 along with her sister, Mary Jane Davey.[4]

All that was known about her was from the listing of the survivors for both of her parents. In February 1886, she was Mrs. Lydia Jackson of New York City.[5] In September 1893, she was Mrs. Lida M. Colbey of New York.[6] She supposedly had twin boys, Albert and Alfred.

Well she was found in New York City in 1883, living at 185 Prince. Her name was Lydia Jackson, widow of John.[7] However in the same year, a newspaper account of Mrs Lydia Colby of New York City was visiting her mother, Mrs. Thomas Davy of Jeffersonville.[8]

In 1884, she was living at 269 Elizabeth in New York City as Lydia Jackson, still widow of John.[9] She lived at 203 Bleecker in 1885.[10] The following year she lived at 185 Prince.[11]

New Search Leads To Finding
A search in the “New York State Death Index, 1880-1956” found on FamilySearch brought up a possible candidate for Lydia. “Lydia N Colby, died 9 February 1914, Patchogue, Suffolk Co, New York, no. 11382). The first and last name matched names she was using. Her middle name was Nicholas. They really could be her.

New York State Death Index

I found her in the 1900 and 1910 census with her son, Thomas A. Colby:
  • In 1900, she had moved out to Long Island and was living in Patchogue Village with a son, Thomas A., who was born in July 1863.[12]
  • In 1910, she was living at 267 Cedar with Thomas H Colby.[13]

Newspaper research revealed the entry into probate her estate. Her estate was worth $5000, with bequests to Thomas A. Colby the house on Cedar Street, and homestead, bungalow, personal effects and residue to Thomas A Colby and James A. Colby, sons.[14]

So there were two sons, Thomas A Colby and James A Colby. Were they the result of the marriage to an unknown Colby man? She seemed to also have been married to John Jackson.

There are many more research opportunities from the information gathered here:
  • Get land records for home in Patchogue .
  • Get probate records for Lydia N. Colby.
  • Find marriage records for marriage to John Jackson and to ?? Colby.
  • Obtain death certificate for Thomas A. Colby, to see who are named as his parents.
  • Look for marriage record for Thomas A. Colby to see who are named as his parents. He married Esther Webber sometime near the death of his mother.
  • Probate record might give location for brother, James A. Colby.
It is wonderful to know what had happened to Lydia Davey. The clerk sent me a copy of the death certificate, but it is so difficult to read. I will send away for the state’s copy. It will take many months but hopefully it will be more legible. What I'm hoping to be able to read are the names of her parents and the place where she is buried.


[1] Family data, Thomas Davey Family Bible, (Cincinnati, Ohio: Moore, Wilstch, Keyes & Company, 1859); original owned by [address for private use], transcription done by Mary Davey Korn, granddaughter of Thomas Davey.
[2] 1841 England Census, Somerset, Bedminster, Bristol, folio 41 recto, line 11, Thomas Davey, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 May 2012); PRO HO 107/376/4, GSU roll 288785, citing The National Archives of UK, London.
[3] 1851 England Census, Kent, Deptford, St. Nicholas parish, page 5-6, household 24, Thomas Davey, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 May 2012); PRO HO 107/1585, GSU roll 174822, citing The National Archives of UK, London.
[4] Central United Methodist (Reading, Pennsylvania), Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Historical Society of Pennsylvania., St. Peter's Church, Baptisms p 1, Lydia Davey baptism; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 June 2012).
[5] "Thomas Davey," Jeffersonville (Indiana) Daily News, 9 Feb 1886, p. 2, digital image, NewspaperArchive (http://newspaperarchive.com).
[6] "Death of Mrs. Mary Davey," Jeffersonville (Indiana) News, 19 Sep 1893, p 4.
[7] New York City Register (New York: The Trow City Directory Company), 1883, p. 932, Lydia Jackson; digital image, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 13 June 2016).
[8] No title," Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky), 11 May 1883, p. 8; digital image, ProQuest (http://proquest.com : accessed ), Historical Newspapers.
[9] New York City Register (New York: The Trow City Directory Company), 1884, p. 829, Lydia Jackson; digital image, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 13 June 2016).
[10] Ibid, 1885, p. 854, Lydia Jackson.
[11] Ibid, 1886, p. 932, Lydia Jackson.
[12] 1900 U.S. census, Suffolk Co, New York, Brookhaven (Patchogue Village), ED 750, sht 14b, 330/342, Lydia N Colby, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), T623, roll 1165.
[13] 1910 U.S. census, Suffolk Co, New York, Brookhaven, ED 1355, sht 2a, p 235, 38/38, Lydia N Colby household, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), NARA T624, roll 1081.
[14] “Suffolk Surrogate’s Court,” The Suffolk County News, 27 Feb 1914, p. 6, digital image, NYS Historic Newspapers (http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 36: School Days

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I always loved school, even if I wasn’t the best student. I liked the structure. Summers were fun, but after a few weeks, I missed the routine of the classroom. I liked learning new things, too.

It took a long time for me to finally figure out how to study to be successful. Now, as an adult, I know why I didn’t do as well in school. For one, I’m a visual learner so whenever instructions were given verbally, I usually missed something important. Secondly, our parents didn’t do a lot of things with us. We had few vacations or even day trips. My dad worked six days a week, and by the time there were six kids, it made it hard (and expensive) to take trips.

During summers, I liked to play school, and would set up classrooms where I was the teacher to my younger brothers and sisters. It was probably good for them to get the extra practice. I thought I would be a teacher when I grew up, until I got older. I found science more interesting than teaching.

My best class in school was spelling. I would practice writing the words over and over on Thursday night and by Friday, I could spell the words. Unfortunately, I wouldn’t remember how to spell them later in my writing. I’m a much better speller now. Thank goodness for spell check, too!

In elementary school, recess was fun. In the 4th grade, our school got new monkey bars. The line would be so long we only got about two passes during recess. I had some pretty nasty blisters on my hand from them. There were also other bars that the girls would hang out at. Some of the girls could spin around and around on one leg or hang upside down and flip off. I wanted to be able to do that, but could never. Mostly I was afraid of heights.

Other games we played at recess were jump rope, hopscotch, four-square, tetherball, and jacks. I loved to jump double-dutch. I wish I could remember some of the ditties we used to sing. At my 10th birthday party, we gave all the girls jacks as a favor. We would sit in the breezeway playing jacks during recess. Then the boys in the class got jealous and Mrs. Eckhardt bought jacks for the boys to use, too.

My favorite grade was 4th. We had California history and Mrs. Eckhard had artifacts of the Native Americans. I did a report on Mission San Diego. We also learned some German.

In the 7th grade, I got a new friend, Beth, with whom I've been friends since. We both loved to read, meet downtown on Saturdays to shop, and play catch in the backyard.

The schools I attended were:
  • Kindergarten: Pittsburg Grammar School
  • 1st, 2nd, and part of 3rd: St. Peter Martyr School
  • 3rd, 4th, 5th, & 6th: Parkmead Elementary
  • 7th & 8th: Parkmead Intermediate
  • 9th thru 12th: Las Lomas High School
  • College: California State University, Hayward
  • post college work: studied Calculus and German at Diablo Valley College; a teaching credential at Cal State Univ, Hayward.



Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, September 2, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Aug 26-Sep 1, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:
Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
I watched no webinars this week. I did check in with both of my cert study groups. We had good conversations at both.

Own Work:
I spent the first part of the week scanning all of the documents in my Nilsen and Lundquist folders that hadn’t been scanned yet. Then I met with my husband’s aunt and cousin to deliver all my files for both of the families. His aunt is donating all of the Nilsen and Lundquist family papers to the California State Archives. I felt my papers should go with them. I plan to go again to her house later this month to help file the papers I brought.

I had two orders for records from the Contra Costa County Court office and the Recorders office which I took care of this week. And a new order for transcribing some deeds for a friend.

I volunteered at the History Center (CCCHS), the Oakland FamilySearch Library, and at the California Genealogical Society’s library this week. I was gone from the History Center for nearly a month and there were several queries for me to take care of. I helped a gentlemen learn how to find land records on the FS catalog and he found a deed that gave relationships, so he was happy. The CGS library was pretty quiet on Friday.

Other
I got in a couple of walks and one yoga class. I attended my first ukulele class in a month and operated trains during the show at the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society on Friday. The weekend was spent watching lots of tennis on T.V. Love watching the US Open.



Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 35: At Work – Reprise on Ancestors Who Were in the Union

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

When we work, we rarely take photos of ourselves or have photos taken of ourselves while at work. I did previously write about my union card-carrying ancestors. The post is here.

I did manage to get a few of me in the newspaper while I was at work.




Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.