Wednesday, October 30, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 44: Halloween: Kid’s Costumes

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

This week for Halloween, I decided to feature some of the costumes my daughters wore for Halloween. Most years, I made their costumes, though sometimes they were borrowed or bought, and often handed down.
Store-bought costumes

One costume borrowed was the pumpkin costume Elizabeth wore her first year at the Creative Play Cooperative Pre-school. It was a surprise that she matched her teacher.

The following year, she was a bride.

We often attended the Halloween party given by Margaret’s friend, Sam. They carved pumpkins and played games. Parents sat around visiting while eating potluck food. It was always a fun time.


Here is a shot from a party given by their babysitter’s daughter. All three of us dressed up.
These two costumes were hand-made

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 28, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Oct 21-27, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
I attended my Thursday evening  online study group, and Kim, Linda, and I had a very engaging conversation about the KDP. In my Friday group, after everyone checked in, we discussed DNA standards.

I attended the Sacramento German Genealogy Society to listen to Dr. Roger Minert speak about his project, German Immigrants in American Church Records. He spoke about the start of the project, how he has kept it going while working at BYU, and how he would continue the project after being retired. He created a 501(c)3 organization and I wrote a check for his project. He pays students to extract the information from microfilm and from photocopies of church records they can find. It’s a worthwhile project, as these records often give the German hometown.

I attempted to watch the NARA virtual presentations on Wednesday, but our internet was not working. Instead, I had previously downloaded the handouts which included the presentations and viewed most of them. I can still go to YouTube and view the recordings. I still need to view the Homestead presentation.

Client Work:
No client work this week.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center this week, I worked only a couple of hours before heading up to Sacramento. I also worked at the Oakland FamilySearch center. I helped one woman who wanted the original record to back up derivative papers she had. I found the records on FamilySearch for her.

I visited two historical societies this week to write articles for the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society’s newsletter. Friday, I went to Moraga and had a nice visit. On Saturday morning, the Walnut Creek Historical Society let me view their history room and it was a pleasure to meet the two volunteers there. Moraga’s article will be in the next issue and Walnut Creek’s will be in the first issue in 2020.

Own Work:
I did no genealogy research of my own family this week.

I taught the last Acalanes Adult School class on genealogy this week. We studied the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org websites live, as I demonstrated how to use various areas of the site – searching on specific databases and using the catalog at FamilySearch. Those that filled out the final evaluation all gave kudos to the class and are looking forward to next quarter.

Other:
I attended the Pacific Coast Region of the NMRA board meeting on Saturday. It was my first as Director. We meet two times a year and the next meeting will be at the PCR convention in April.

Sunday, Elizabeth had to evacuate from her town of Sebastopol and the place in Santa Rosa where she was staying and come here. We had planned to go up to Sacramento to spend the day with Norman’s brother, Brian and wife, Linda. We toured first the California Museum, located at the State Archives. There were some very interesting exhibits on Japanese-American interment, California's remarkable women, and mural art in East Los Angeles. We had dinner at One Speed, an Italian restaurant, where I ordered a very delicious gluten-free pizza. It was a very nice day, but the wind on the way up was so strong. Tree branches littered the streets in Sacramento and adjacent to the freeway in places. 







Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 26, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Photograph(s) of Your Favorite Heirloom(s)

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Here is our assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing:
1)  Last week we shared the heirlooms that we inherited or obtained from our families.
2)  This week, please show a photograph of one or two of them.
3)  Share your cherished heirloom(s) in your own blog post, on Facebook, and leave a link to it in the comments.
Last week, I shared two blog posts that I wrote about some heirlooms I have. I also mentioned some others that I will now show here.

Glass-domed clock. This clock was passed down to me by my grandmother, Pansy Louise (Lancaster) Johnston in 2005. I always loved watching this clock when I was a young child and am glad I now have it. It is not working now, so I need to find a clock repair shop. This clock was made in Germany.  I searched for these clocks and Google and found they are called Anniversary Clocks.  I found on sale at eBay a Kundo Clock very similar to mine for $50. Maybe it’s not as special as I thought. However, I cherish the memories of seeing it in my grandparent’s home.
Anniversary Clock
Pearl necklace. The pearl necklace also came from my grandmother, Pansy Louise Johnston. It was an occasion where she was giving away jewelry she had to my sisters and me. I didn’t care for much of it—too gaudy for me, but I did love the pearls, so it was the only piece I took and I let my sisters have the rest. I do enjoy the pearls and love the feel of them against my skin.


Wedding ring. My aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron, passed the ring to me. It was my father’s mother’s wedding ring. I don’t know how long she wore it. She was separated from her husband, William Cyril Hork, since at least 1938-39 until his death in 1967. I wore the ring for awhile until my fingers became too big when I was pregnant with my first child. Now it rests with my other rings.



The boar & the couple. These two items came from Mrs. Annie Hardin, a woman who lived in Sacramento and the person with whom my father-in-law, George Joseph Gorrell lived when he first came to Sacramento to work at the air field at McClellan. She was a special person to him and the family visited her often. We have a few other things of hers that I have not photographed yet. She died in 1962.



Step stool. This step stool was made by Norman’s grandfather, Joseph Norman Gorrell. It was likely reupholstered by either his mother or father. It was passed down to Norman by his father, George Joseph Gorrell.



So that is a good start. I’ll have to do more of these to document heirlooms we have for our children.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, October 24, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 43: Transportation: Lorene Traveled Around the World Part III

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I have previously written about my father’s sister, Lorene E. Hork, who worked for the U.S. Army in Tokyo before she and three other gals left for a trip around the world in the fall of 1953. Check out Part I and Part II.

I left off the last post with the gals in Taipei, Formosa (now known as Taiwan). They next continued their travels aboard the ship to Hong Kong for a few hours, where they shopped and took a cab to Repulse Bay where they drove “on beautiful winding roads high up in the hills overlooking the City.” 

The ship continued onto Manila in The Philippines. There they took a three-hour cab ride around the city, visiting the Malacañang Palace, where the President resides, and viewing the ruins of the Walled City, which was nearly completely destroyed in World War II.  Later, they stopped to see a Cock Fight, which Lorene thought they were
“too bloody and depressing; the betting was the most thrilling part to me—everyone yelling and placing their bets on their favorite cock.”
They finally arrived in Bangkok, Siam, where they off boarded the ship. Lorene was excited to receive letters from her sisters and mother! They met some Pan Am pilots who took them out where they checked out an opium den. They stayed there three days, touring the city and taking photos. Here are two post cards she sent to her sister, June, and her mother, Anne.






After Bangkok, they flew to Calcutta aboard Thai Air Ways. It was two of her friends, Donna and Mitzi’s, first flight so they visited the cockpit first. She said about the flight:
“At altitude we would be all rolled up in blankets, freezing to death, then as soon as we’d begin to fly lower or land, the heat was terrific. The girls were a little frightened and were trying to figure out which would be better—to crack up in the Indian Ocean or the jungles of Burma.”
They kept it economical in Calcutta by staying in a YWCA. One American dollar was exchanged for four rupees. Their single rooms with large fan came with board (three meals plus tea & crumpets in the afternoon) and cost nine rupees per day. They were bombarded with hundreds of beggars in the streets. A young man, Ali, took them on a tour of Hindu temples and Moslem mosque. They visited the botanical gardens on another day and rode a boat on the Ganges River. She lamented there was no night life, as they were told it was not safe for them to go out, so they spent their evenings reading or writing letters.

Their next journey to New Delhi would be by train.  To be continued....

So on this journey: ship, plane, taxi, and train: all great modes of public transportation!

1947 issue of Hammond's World Atlas, Handy Desk Edition

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Oct 14-20, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
  • NGS Quarterly Study Group where we discussed George L. Findlen’s article
  • “It’s a Numbers Game! Understanding Genealogical Formats” by Alice Hoyt Veen, CG for the APG Writers SIG

I attended the Monday Morning Group of the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society and showed examples of the records I photographed at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis during my summer vacation.

I also attended my Thursday evening  online study group, and Kim and I had a very engaging conversation.

Client Work:
No client work this week.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center this week, I worked on the newspaper finding aid, checking against the microfilm that was donated.  A request was made to do a search in the Village Pioneer and we have that on microfilm. Also on Saturday, we were trained on using the new digital scanner/viewer. I taught the salesman a new trick! These are the same machines found at Family History Centers. Thursday night was our Board Meeting and I took minutes.

Own Work:
I researched more about the passports I wrote about in the 52 Ancestors meme this week. The originals are located at the Georgia Archives in Morrow, Georgia, which is south of Atlanta.  I also did some deed research on the Coor family in Sampson County, North Carolina records at FamilySearch. These are all freely available online from home. One of the later deeds gave great information about the children of Daniel Coor and their present locations! I’ll be writing about that soon.

I taught the third Acalanes Adult School class on genealogy this week. I finished the lesson on research trips, and then began the lesson on tips for solving tough problems. We had just fifteen minutes to do the group exercise but I think they enjoyed it. Next week will be the last session.

Other:
I attended my first Coast Division board of operations meeting as their rep to the Pacific Coast Region board of directors. There will be a PCR board meeting this coming Saturday.

On Sunday, Norman and I visited our daughter, Elizabeth, in Sebastopol. We stopped at the Hale Ranch and Walker Ranch for apples. Norman plans to make more fermented applesauce.  The fall color was beautiful and I took some photos of vineyards. We walked around the park at the laguna and then drove to Santa Rosa where we ate dinner at the French restaurant, Walter Hansel Wine & Bistro. The place is cute and the food delicious.








Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- What Family Heirlooms Did You Inherit or Obtain?

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

It's Saturday Night again - 

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has our assignment for this week. 

1) The NEHGS Weekly Genealogy newsletter asked an interesting question this week - let's use it for our SNGF this week.

2) What "family heirlooms" did you inherit or obtain? What are your most cherished possessions that were owned or created by an ancestor or relative? They could be photographs, letters or documents, a diary, an audio or video recording, books, jewelry, clothing, quilts, needlework, drawing or painting, toy or doll, collectibles, musical instrument, furniture, something else?

3) Share your cherished heirloom(s) in your own blog post, on Facebook, and leave a link to it in the comments.

I have written two previous blog posts about heirlooms I have. 


I have some other heirlooms: pearl necklace from my Mam-ma, my Nana's wedding band, a domed clock (that doesn't work). At least on the top of my head. My husband has a footstool made by his grandfather, a chair made by his great-grandfather, some other woodworking items, and some knick knacks. Some day I need to document all of these items or our children will just sell or give them away.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 14, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Oct 7-13, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:
Webinars/Study Groups Attended:
I attended only one webinar this week:
  • 50 Records for Female Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega
I also attended both of my online study groups and we had very engaging conversations. We saw Faye for the first time in months on Friday and it was nice hearing what she has been up to.

Client Work:
I had a court record pulls in Contra Costa and Alameda counties this week.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center this week, I made sure all of our special collections have been entered in Past Perfect as well as being uploaded to the Online Archive of California website.  

Friday was my desk duty day at the California Genealogical Society’s Library. It was quiet for the first four hours and then I had two customers who work on their own.

Own Work:
I started transcribing the employee cards for my grandfather, William C. Hork, from when he was working for the WPA in Ontario, San Bernardino County, California. Sometimes he worked as a foreman, a pipe fitter, or as a laborer. Most of the jobs were at Chaffey Junior College. I’m about a third of the way through the sixty cards. I had obtained these images from the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis this past summer.

I taught the second Acalanes Adult School class on genealogy this week. Fifteen of my students returned and seemed to have enjoyed the previous class and did the homework. I added a review session, applying it to resolving a conflict. I then began the lesson on research trips. Lissa, the administrative assistant for program, was waiting outside my door at the end of class wanting my write-up for the next quarter. I worked on that over the weekend. Thanks to discussions with Jacqueline and Dennis, I now have an idea of what to do.

Other:
On Saturday, Norman and I went on the Home Tour in Martinez, hosted by the Martinez Historical Society. We viewed six different homes. We also got in extra walking as we walked to the Shell Clubhouse and walked most of the route before walking home. Many of the homes were decorated in Halloween themes. Norman liked the last house best, because he had old player pianos and organs, and a very interesting backyard with both a view and a bocce ball court.


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Which Ancestral Home Would You Like to Visit?


Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has another fun activity for us today. 
Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  Tell us which ancestral home (an actual building, a village, a town, even a country) you would most like to visit.   Which ancestors lived there, and for how long? 

2)  Share your ancestral home information in your own blog post, on Facebook, and leave a link to it in the comments.

Thank you to Linda Stufflebean for suggesting this topic.

The ancestral hometowns I would like to visit is Oberhundem, Kirchhundem, and Altenhundem, which today are very close to each other in the district of Olpe, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.
  



During the German Empire (1871-1918), there were 1296 inhabitants.[1] My great-grandfather, Johan Anton Hork, came to the U.S. in 1870.[2]

Today, the village has 898 residents.[3] Mostly the area is in the mountains and is recognized as a health resort. Many Germans visit the area for skiing, hiking, and other outdoor recreation in nature parks.

Isn't Oberhundem adorable?

Because it is so remote, we will probably need a car to get there. Websites always translate to English when using Chrome, so I am not sure if there will be residents who speak English. I might have to settle with my B1 German. But it would be great fun (viel Spaß) to walk in the places of my Hork, Trösster, Sommer, Döbener, and Voss ancestors.


[1] Meyers Ort Gazetteer, Meyersgaz.org (https://www.meyersgaz.org/place/20368064aa).
[2] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), 5 Nov 1870, SS Idaho, line 39, no. 1030, Joh Hork, citing NARA M237, roll 336.
[3] “Oberhundem,” Wikipedia (https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberhundem).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 41: Context—William C. Hork Worked For the WPA

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

The first hint that my paternal grandfather, William C. Hork, worked for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was the entry for him in the 1940 Federal Census. He stated he was a laborer for the WPA.[1] The WPA was a New Deal agency that helped employ millions of out-of-work men and women, mostly unskilled. It was established on 6 May 1935 and dissolved on 30 June 1943.[2]

The second piece of information that gave reference to the WPA was his World War II draft registration, conducted on 16 February 1942. He stated he worked on the WPA. project #12322-S at the Ontario Municipal Airport in Ontario, San Bernardino Co, Calif.[3]

So he worked for the WPA. How can I get these records? In checking with the NARA website, I found that in submitting NA Form 14137 “Request Pertaining to Works Progress Administration (WPA) Personnel Records” I could get copies for a fee through the mail. Their website has a few sample WPA documents.

I did not send away for his records, but rather the next time I visited St. Louis, Missouri, I arranged to view the records at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), where I took photos of them.

There were sixty cards in his file.[4] The first card was an “Assignment Slip.” It appears from this first card and the cards detailing his pay, that he started with them in November 1935 and worked through to March 1942, though not necessarily continuously. There were cards terminating him due to being absent or failing to report.

Currently, I am working through the cards and transcribing them. From this first glance, he worked in public projects in Ontario, California, which is the county seat of San Bernardino County. The biggest project was the demolition of Chaffey Junior College. It had been founded as a private college in 1883 and publicly funded since 1916. An earthquake centered in Long Beach in 1933 damaged many of the buildings.[5] Many of the projects of the WPA and the SERA (State Emergency Relief Administration) funds were the demolition and rebuilding of the liberal arts building, the science building, the auditorium, gym, and library.[6]

Some jobs he worked as a foreman, others as a pipe fitter or laborer. Each of the positions might last a few days or weeks, and they each had a different rate of pay. Here are some sample cards. Many are slightly out of focus, so I chose ones that were clear to read. The first two are job assignment or reassignment.



This card shows the pay record.



One of the uses of these cards was I figured out when the family moved from one address to another. I knew they had moved from city directory and voting registration records, but these cards will help narrow down to a closer time frame.

After further analysis of the cards, I might learn more about my grandfather’s work. The notices about not showing up to work might point to his drinking problem. Sometime 1939–1940, he was separated from his wife and children.



All websites viewed 12 October 2019.

[1] 1940 U.S. census, San Bernardino Co, California, pop. sched., Ontario, ED 36-63, sht 64A, p 903, William C. Hork, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), NARA T627, roll 290.
[2] “Works Progress Administration,” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Works_Progress_Administration).
[3] World War II Draft Registration Records, Selective Service Records, National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, Missouri, D.S.S. Form 1, William Cyril Hork, ser. no. 849.
[4] Works Progress Administration (WPA), Personnel Records, William C. Hork, San Bernardino Co, California, ID no. 0436-8086, National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, Missouri. These cards were copied from microfilm prior to my arrival, and it is possible that some cards might be missing. I could see the top of the next card, but one such card was never copied.
[5] “A History of Chaffey College,” Chaffey College (https://www.chaffey.edu/general_info/cchist.shtml).
[6] “Chaffey High School and Old Junior College—Ontario CA,” The Living New Deal (https://livingnewdeal.org/projects/chaffey-high-school-and-old-junior-college-ontario-ca/).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, October 7, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Sep 30-Oct 6, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended: 
I attended no webinars or study groups this week.

Client Work:
I had a vital record pull in Contra Costa County this week.

Volunteer Work:
I entered accessioned items into Past Perfect at the History Center on Tuesday, and worked a few hours at the Oakland FamilySearch Library on Wednesday.

On Saturday, I was part of a team from the California Genealogical Society who offered genealogy consultations for the Nichi Bei Pilgrimage to Wakamatsu, which is outside of Placerville. I had four consultations from a variety of people—most looking for information about their parents or grandparents. Using Ancestry.com, I would find records such as census, draft cards, funeral information, and death certificates. Everyone was excited to see the information and some was new to them.  One woman was looking for information on the three unnamed women buried in the Japanese cemetery in Colma, California. They were suspected of being prostitutes who died perhaps of the plague in 1901. She found a book that gave a clue to their identity and location of their residence. So I searched the 1900 census in San Francisco using the address and birthplace of Japan in the index. We found a possible brothel near that address with seven women working as prostitutes. At first I didn’t think we had a chance to find them. All in all, I think everyone was happy with what we found for them and we hope they can continue the search in the future.




Own Work:
I did some research on Amos Gorrell to help write the two blog posts about him this week. I met with Jacqueline and we worked at the Walnut Creek Library on our own projects for a few hours before breaking for an early dinner. I really like the idea of planning our meet-ups to work on our genealogy. It also gives each of us a sounding board for questions and problem-solving.

I taught the first Acalanes Adult School class on genealogy this week, too. I have eighteen students, with about a third who professed to be beginners. I hope they can get enough out of the class to feel it is worthwhile. I made me realize that I might have to teach a beginning class, which I can do next fall. I’m hoping the students will give me ideas for future classes.

Other:
On Sunday, the committee for the upcoming National Model Railroad Association convention in 2021 met. Although we still need a few key players to handle some of the committees, we are moving along well. I’m secretary and this meeting was the first using Zoom software for those who couldn’t travel to the meeting site. I hope to someday take advantage of using the software, too.


We visited Sebastopol and our daughter, Elizabeth, to help celebrate Norman’s birthday on Sunday. The weather was pleasant, if not a little warm. We purchased apples. tried some cider at Golden State Cider, and then ate dinner in Gratin. 

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- One of Your Immigrant Ancestors

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!
  
Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings has given us another assignment: Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):
1)  Tell us about one of your immigrant ancestors.  Where and when did they come from, how did they migrate, where did they land, where did they settle?
2)  Share your immigrant ancestor information in your own blog post, on Facebook, and leave a link to it in the comments.
Thank you to Linda Stufflebean for suggesting this topic.

I haven’t written about Martin Gleeson, my 3x-great-grandfather. He was born in Ireland between 1787–1891 and died in Carleton County, Ontario, Canada on 9 October 1859.[1]

He married Ann Gleeson, sometime before 1821 if they married before the birth of their first known child, Michael Gleeson, who was born about 1821.[2] She does not appear in any records but her tombstone states she died 9 April 1848.[3]

Four known children were born to Martin and Ann:
  • Michael Gleeson (1821-1865), who married Elizabeth O’Meara and had six children.
  • Mary Ann Gleeson (18??-1904), who married Roderick Cawley and had three children.[4]
  • Honora Gleeson (1831-1908), born in Canada, married James Douras and had four children.
  • John Gleeson (1835-1915), born in Canada, married Margaret Tierney and had 10 children.

It is not completely clear when Martin and Ann Gleeson came to Canada. It was sometime before the birth of Honora who was born in Canada.

It is possible that Martin is the same Martin Gleeson, who came to the Ottawa area in 1823 & 1825. This Martin Gleeson came from County Tipperary, Kilmore, Silver Mines.[5] This man came with 4 females and himself, which doesn’t completely match our man. Where would Michael be?

Martin appeared in the 1851 census with his children:
*Mary
*Honora
*John
and a young man named James Ryan.

He later sold his land to his son, John, in exchange for the right to continue to live on the land until his death.[6]

He died 9 October 1859 and is buried at the St. Patrick’s church cemetery. Below are flags of Ireland and Canada of today. Of course, different flags would have flown over the two countries at the time of Martin's life. Both were subjects of Great Britain.






[1] For his birth of 1787, see tombstone of Martin Gleeson, St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Nepean, Carleton County, now part of Ottawa, photo taken by Susan Swindell. For his birth of 1891, based on age 60 in the 1851 census, Carleton Co, Ontario Canada Census (microfilm), EM Dist 7, pg 95, #22, Martin Gleeson. For his death, see above tombstone photo.
[2] Michael’s birth of 1821 was based on age 30 on next birthday on the 1851 census; see 1851 Census of Canada West (Ontario), Carleton Co, population schedule, digital images, Library and Archives Canada, www.collectionscanada.gc.ca, microfilm C-11716, ED 4, Marborough twp, sub dist 30, pp. 33d-34c, Michael Gleason.
[3] Tombstone of Ann Gleeson, St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cemetery, Nepean, Carleton County, now part of Ottawa, photo taken by Susan Swindell.
[4] Her birthdate is in dispute: 1851 census showed she was 30; 1861 census showed she was 28. Her tombstone shows she died 1904 at age 86, making her birth 1818. More research is needed to resolve this conflict.
[5] Bruce S. Elliott, The McCabe List: Early Irish in the Ottawa Valley, Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto, 1991, p 21, #215, Martin Gleeson.
[6] Carleton Co, Ontario, Registrar of Deeds V. B1, Goulbourne Twp, FHL 0200500, pg 467-468, Gleeson to Gleeson.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, October 4, 2019

Amos Gorrell Purchased Land in Cooper Co, Missouri, 1869

Last week, I wrote about Amos Gorrell, Jr. being enumerated on the 1870 agricultural and population schedules. See this post here.

The ag schedule indicated he had 25 acres of land. The population schedule did not indicate that he owned real estate. The conclusion from that would be he was renting the land he was living on.

However, I have found a land transaction where he purchased about 24 acres of land from James & Virginia Staples in Cooper County, Missouri on 6 Aug 1869 and it was witnessed by W. L. Scott, the Justice of the Peace.[1]

This piece of land was located at the Southwest fractional quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 2, in Township 48, Range 19.

I wanted to know where this was and used Randy Majors website where I could map the section, township, and range, and it would appear on a Google map.[2]

From RandyMajors.com

Because he purchased only a fractional quarter of a quarter, or less than 40 acres, I don't know exactly where in the red box was his 24 acres. However, I can see he was close to the Blackwater River.

Here is the satellite image of the same location.

So now, I wonder why he didn’t list the value of the property in the 1870 population schedule.
-------------------------

[1] Cooper County, Missouri, Deeds, bk 2, p 473-74, James & Virginia Staples to Amos Gorrell.
[2] “Section Township Range on Google Maps,” digital image, randymajors.org (https://www.randymajors.com/p/township-range-on-google-maps.html : accessed 4 Oct 2019), Section 2, Township 48N, Range 19W in Cooper Co, Missouri.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 40: Harvest—Amos Gorrell on the 1870 Ag Schedule

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Amos Gorrell, Jr. (1837-1928) was a farmer. He owned 25 acres of land in 1870 in LaMine Township, Cooper County, Missouri.[1] Eleven of the acres was improved for farming, while fourteen was still wooded. Amos stated the property was worth $350. Today, that amount would be worth $6,708.96.[2] His farm implements were worth $25.

The above information on the farm is from the Agricultural Schedule of the 1870 U.S. Federal Census. Below are two images of the schedule as the census covers across two pages. The census lists the livestock and crops that he raised the previous year.


Amos’ livestock included two horses, two milch (milk) cows, five other cattle, and twenty-five swine, all valued at $200. He received cash of $150 from slaughtered or sold animals.

The crops he raised were 200 bushels of Indian corn, 45 bushels of Irish potatoes, and 50 pounds of butter.

He also received $70 from forest products, probably from the sale of wood from his forest.

All in all, the value of his farm production was $600.

His farm was rather small. The neighbors around him had larger farms. Daniel Clark, who was listed after him had 516 acres of land valued at $12,000. Nathan Keirn, who was listed immediately above him had 120 acres valued at $2000, though his total production was less than Amos’ at $300. As you can see in the image below, Amos earned more than some of the other farmers who had larger farms.


Now, it is interesting that in the population schedule, Amos does not appear to own the property.[3] No amount is listed for land or personal value. Perhaps he was renting the land from one of his neighbors such as Danl Clark. 


The next task would be to search land indexes to see if and when Amos purchased land. Also, I should check the 1880 agricultural schedule to compare for any changes.



[1] 1870 U.S. Ag census, Cooper Co, Missouri, digital image, Missouri State Archives, https://www.sos.mo.gov/CMSImages/Archives/Census/Ag_1870/Ag_1870_Cooper.pdf, La Mine, p. 1, no. 2, Amos Gorrell.
[2] CPI Inflation Calculator, calculated based on 2018 dollars, http://www.in2013dollars.com/1870-dollars-in-2018?amount=350.
[3] 1870 U.S. census, Cooper Co, Missouri, pop. sched., p 441a, fam 3, Amos Gorrell, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), citing NARA M593, roll 77.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.