Saturday, March 30, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Ancestor's Occupations

It's Saturday Night,
time for more Genealogy Fun!!

For this week's mission (should you decide to accept it), answer the question:

1)  What were the occupations of your ancestors?

2)  Please go back several generations (say parents or grandparents or great-grandparents) and list the occupations that they had in the records you've found for them.  You could do this, say, by ancestor table number.

3)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment on this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.

I am also listing by ancestor number, skipping myself. Some of my ancestors were easy to document because California has both city directories and voter registrations to supplement time between census records. But my Texas ancestors have few records. I am also stopping with my great-grandparents.

2. William J. Hork (1930-2007), my father, had these occupations:
  • 1950: Fitzpatrick Chevy Dealer as parts chaser and grease monkey
  • 1953: Flying A Service station
  • 1955: Assistant Manager at Public Loan Corp[1]
  • 1957-1962: Clerk at Safeway[2]
  • 1963-1970s: Produce Clerk, Manager, and Buyer for LoRay Stores in Walnut Creek, which later was bought out by Ralphs.
  • 1979: Ran a produce stand in Hayward.
  • 1980-1993: Worked as a produce clerk for Safeway

 

3. Lela Nell Johnston (1934-1992), my mother, had these occupations:
  • 1952: clerk at J.C. Penney
  • 1953-1992: housewife and mother


4. William Cyril Hork (1899-1967), my paternal grandfather, had these known occupations:
  • 1918-1919: Seaman 2nd class, in Mare Island, and at Submarine Base in San Pedro, California[3]
  • 1919: Laborer for NB Keeney & Son, Hamilton, MT
  • 1920-1921: clerk for AJ Hork, merchant, Hamilton, MT
  • 1921: laborer, Equity Corp Association, Hamilton, MT
  • 1922: farming, CM Moore, Hamilton, MT
  • 1922: Warehouseman for the Northern Pacific Railway in Hamilton, Montana[4]
  • 1923: Clerk in Los Angeles, California[5]
  • 1925: Laborer in Los Angeles.[6]
  • 1926: Salesman, in Los Angeles.[7]
  • 1930: worked on a farm as a laborer.[8]
  • 1932: worked as a driver.[9]
  • 1936: worked as a foreman, place unknown.[10]
  • 1940: worked for the government, in the WPA program[11]
  • 1942: worked as a pipe liner probably for the WPA at the Ontario Municipal Airport[12]
  • 1946-1960s: he did not work, living at the national Military Hospital in Los Angeles.


4. Anna Marie Sullivan (1892-1979), my paternal grandmother had these occupations:
  • 1915-1922: teacher for various school districts in Montana[13]
  • 1922-1939: wife and mother
  • 1939-1940: waitress at café in San Bernardino[14]
  • 1940-1943: waitress at Cozy Corner in Napa, California[15]
  • 1944-1948: teacher at one room school house in Napa county[16]
  • 1949-1962: teacher at William Elementary School in Concord and substitute teacher in Pittsburg, California[17]


6.  Tom J. Johnston (1912-1973), my maternal grandfather had these occupations:
  • 1930: listed as a ranch hand[18]
  • 1930s-1950s: carpenter, working various jobs
  • 1950s: ran a bar/pool hall and taxi service with his brother
  • 1960s-1973: maintenance carpenter at Diablo Valley College

 


7.  Pansy Louise Lancaster (1913-2013), my maternal grandmother had these occupations:
  • 1950s-1975: worked as saleslady for woman’s boutiques, lastly The Clothes Horse. She also did alternations at women’s and men’s stores.
 
8.  Johan Anton Hork (1843-1906), my paternal great-grandfather worked only as a tailor.[19]

9.  Julia Ann Sievert (1854-1928), my paternal great-grandmother did not work outside the home.

10. John H. Sullivan (1854-1932), my paternal great-grandfather worked primarily as an electrician for the Anaconda Mining Company.[20]

11. Anna Marie Gleeson (1860-1912), my paternal great-grandmother did not work outside the home. She was a farmer, as she obtained a homestead.[21]

12. Thomas Newton Johnston (1885-1951), my maternal great-grandfather worked at:
  • 1907-1917: farmer[22]
  • 1918-1940s: worked at a lumber yard[23]


13. Nell L. Hutson (1888-1919), my maternal great-grandmother did not work outside the home.

14. George Warren Lancaster (1893-1964), my maternal great-grandfather worked at the following:
  • 1910s-1920s: worked as a farmer, raising first cotton, then grains.[24]
  • 1930s-1950s: worked as an auto mechanic[25]

15. Lela Ann Loveless (1896-1951), my maternal great-grandmother did not work outside


[1] Pittsburg-Antioch City Directory, 1955: 221, Wm J. Hork (Lela N), (Los Angeles, California: R. L. Polk, 1955).
[2] Pittsburg-Antioch City Directory, 1957: 304, Wm J. Hork (Lela N), RL Polk. Also ibid, 1959: 304. Also ibid, 1960: 183. Also ibid, 1962: 203.
[3] Military Enlistments (Montana), World War I, Montana Adjutant General's Office Records 1889-1959 (RS 223), Montana Historical Society Research Center, Helena, Montana., World War I (HAUGEN-JACOBSON), Cyril Willis Hork, ser. no. 173-64-55.
[4] "Northern Pacific Railway Company Personnel Files, 1890-1963," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 25 Nov 2015), File 144100, Cyril Willis Hork. This application listed all previous work.
[5] Santa Monica, Ocean Park, Venice Sawtelle and Westgate Directory City Directory, 1923, p 303, Cyril W (Anna) Hork,  Los Angeles Directory Co, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[6] Ibid, 1925, p. 430, Wm (Ann) Hork.
[7] "California Voter Registration 1900-1968," 1926, roll 19, Los Angeles Co, Los Angeles Precinct no. 1100, William H. Hork, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[8] 1930 U.S. census, San Bernardino Co, California, Ontario City, ED 3b-41, sheet sht 13b, p. 182b, dwelling 380, family 453, William Hork; NARA microfilm publication T626, 188.
[9] "California Voter Registration 1900-1968," 1932, San Bernardino Co, Ontario Precinct 15, roll 6, William C. Hork, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[10] Ibid, 1936, San Bernardino Co, Ontario Precinct 7, William C Hork.
[11] 1940 U.S. census, San Bernardino Co, California, Ontario, ED 36-63, sht 64A, p 903, William C. Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 Apr 2012), NARA T627, roll 290;.
[12] "California Voter Registration 1900-1968," 1942, San Bernardino Co, Ontario Precinct No. 18, roll 12, William C. Hork, digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com). See also World War II Draft Registration Records, Selective Service Records, National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, Missouri, D.S.S. Form 1, William Cyril Hork, ser. no. 849.
[13] Polk's Anaconda (Deer Lodge County, Mont) City Directory, 1918, p 311, Anna Sullivan, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[14] 1940 U.S. census, San Bernardino Co, California, Cucamonga, ED 36-36, sheet sht 65a, p. 472, household 150, Anna M Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[15] Napa City Directory, 1942: 73, Anne Hork, Polk-Husted Directory Co, 1942.
[16] Ibid, 1948-49: 112.
[17] Contra Costa Gazette, Martinez, California; clippings/newspaper held by the Contra Costa County Historical Society History Center, Martinez, California, "Williams School Enrollment", 1 Sep 1949, mentions Mrs Ann Hork.
[18] 1930 U.S. census, Erath Co, Texas, pop sched, Stephenville, enumeration district (ED) 2, sheet 3b, p. 40b (stamped), dwelling 55, family 63, Thomas T Johnston, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 18 May 2011), T626, roll 2326.
[19] 1900 U.S. Census, Ravalli County, Montana, population schedule, ED 81, Sheet 15a, p 33 (stamped), household/family 285, John A Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 Jun 2011), citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 914. See also numerous city directories in Hamilton, Montana, Portland, Oregon and Detroit, Michigan.
[20] 1900 U.S. census, Deer Lodge County, Montana, population schedule, Anaconda, ED 15, sht 1, dwelling 24, family 24, John Sullivan, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 Jun 2011), citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 911.
[21] Land Entry Papers, 1800-1908; Record Group 49; Records of the Bureau of Land Management; National Archives, Washington, D.C., Ann Gleeson (Davison County) homestead file, final certificate no. 14038, Mitchell, South Dakota, Land Office.
[22] 1900 U.S. census, Comanche Co, Texas, pop. sched., Justice Precinct 3 (part of), enumeration district (ED) 7, sheet 1a, p. 168a, dwelling 8, family 8, Thomas N. Johnston, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Nov 2011), citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1541.
[23] 1940 U.S. census, Erath Co, Texas, population sched., Stephenville, enumeration district (ED) ED 72-34, 8a, p. 32 (stamped), household 188, Tom N Johnston; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 December 2015).
[24] 1920 U.S. census, Erath Co, pop. sched., ED 7, sht 3A, Dublin Public Highway, dwelling 44, family 45, Warren Lancaster, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), T625, roll 1801.
[25] 1940 U.S. census, Erath Co, Texas, pop sched., Stephenville, ward 2, enumeration district (ED) 72-7, 4A, household 75, Warren Lancaster; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 3 April 2012).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, March 29, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 13: In The Paper – Joe Gorrell is Sued

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Sometimes the way we find out that there was a court case is from an article in the newspaper. In the Joplin News Herald on 3 September 1926 was an article about Fred O. Banks of Carthage, Missouri filing a suit against the Empire District Electric Company and Joe Gorrell, asking for $10,000 damages for the death of his wife in an automobile accident.[1]


Surely there was more information about the accident earlier in the newspaper. Sure enough, in the 19 August 1926 issue of the Joplin Globe newspaper, a longer article about the accident was published.[2] Joe Gorrell, who was the driver of a service truck for the electric company, refused to testify at an inquest. So the jury returned an open verdict. According to the dictionary, open verdict means that a crime has been committed but didn’t name the criminal, or saying that there had been a death, but not naming the cause.[3]  The article stated that Gorrell “stood on his constitutional rights at the inquest.” According to Dr. R.M. Stormont, “the jury returned an open verdict because it was not developed directly as to whether Gorrell made as great an effort to stop as did Banks.”

From reading the newspaper account, it appears that Gorrell’s truck was already in the intersection when Banks approached, who applied his brakes and swerved to the right to avoid the truck. He hit the front wheel of the truck with the left side of his car. He also hit the curb which caused the car to turn over.  Mrs. Banks, Fred O. Banks’ wife, died.

The online newspaper sites do not have all of the issues around this time period, so I haven’t found any other issues except for the news about the final verdict. Fred O. Banks was awarded $5,000 damages in his suit against the Empire District Electric Company. No mention of Joe Gorrell was in the article.[4]


So to find out more about the case, I have inquired with the Jasper County Court about getting copies of the case. I will report on what I find.



[1] “$10,000 Damage Suit Follows Woman’s Death,” Joplin News Herald, 3 Sep 1926, digital image, Newspaper.com.
[2] “Driver Refuses to Testify at Banks Inquest,” Joplin News Herald, 19 Aug 1926, p. 8, digital image, Newspaperarchive.com.
[3] “Open verdict,” definition, Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/open%20verdict : accessed 29 Mar 2019).
[4] “$5,000 Judgment is Given Fred O. Banks,” Joplin Globe,  p. 7, digital image, Newspaper.com.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of March 17-24, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing: I wrote the following blog post this week:
  • 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks For week 12, I wrote about no. 12 in my husband’s ahnetafel chart: his great-grandfather, Nils Malkom Nilsen.
  • For Saturday Night Genealogy Fun, we were asked to writing about the birth order of one of our lines. So I did one of my grandmother’s side.

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:  I attended:
  • “The Five-Story Fall: Correlating Indirect and Direct Evidence to Extend the Pedigree,” by Debbie Mieszala, CG, for BCG Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
  • “One African American Family’s Story of Migration,” J. Mark Lowe, CG, for Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
  • “Scarlet Letters: Copyright, Ethics and Family Correspondence,” by Denise May Levenick, MA, for the APG Writers SIG.
  • “Becoming a Better Conference Speaker: Proposals and Preparation” by Julie Miller, on the NGS website.
  • “Rescuing Orphaned Items: How to Save and Share Ebay, Etsy and Flea Market Finds,” by Thomas MacEntee, for Legacy Family Tree Webinars.
  • “Reconstructing Your Genetic Family Tree,” by Blaine Bettinger, for Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

I volunteered at the Contra Costa County Historical Society’s History Center on Tuesday. Worked on some queries and then John and I started on the Starkey Collection for the finding aid. We had our board meeting on Thursday at the Museum of San Ramon Valley in Danville. They have a nice exhibit on the 1960s we viewed before the meeting.

Own Work. My work this week was centered on working on the George M. Barnes family in Hinds Co. He married Mary J Cooper, who was the daughter of Joseph Cooper and Mary Coor. Still trying to connect him to the same George M. Barnes who was the administrator of the John Coor estate in Copiah County.

I scanned the photos from my sister’s cookbook for the upcoming family book that I’m working on about our parents and grandparents. I will meet with my youngest sister on Monday to do the same.

I also played with DNA Painter, after watching the Blaine Bettinger webinar. I don’t have many matches on Family Tree DNA, MyHeritage, or GEDMatch that I know how we are related. I did manage to paint some of three different lines.

I am now part of two different Certification discussion groups that meet weekly. I encouraged a group of genealogists who want to become certified to get together so they have a forum to discuss issues and get encouragement from each other. I told them about how the group I had joined really helped me stay on track and turn in the portfolio. So now I’m the “leader” of the Thursday evening group, but I’m thinking more of a facilitator. Perhaps one day, they won’t need me at all. We had a nice discussion about presenting at genealogical societies and conferences at my Friday group. Annette gave us great tips, as well as recommending the video on the NGS website on preparing conference proposals. That is a video I’d watch again.

Other Activities
We’re almost done with the corrections/additions to the Friends of Alhambra Creek brochure. Off to the printer next, so it’s ready for the upcoming John Muir Earth Day Birthday celebration in April. Elaine and I worked at the Strentzel Meadow on Saturday for a NPS workday, clearing up a new path away from the fence and running water. There was a nice group of volunteers to help! She had her electric powered saw and worked hard.


I also worked hard in my garden, clearing weeds and grass from around the new sprouting California Poppies. I also planted some geraniums that I had in pots into the ground, and two native plants I purchased last fall: California Rose and California honeysuckle. The honeysuckle looks wilted and may not make it. There must be something wrong with the soil, as I’ve lost other plants there, too.


In the meadow after an evening of rain


Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 12: Ahnentafel No. 8–Reverend Nils Malkom Nilsen

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

The Ahnentafel number 8 in my husband’s ancestry is his great-grandfather, Nils Malkom Nilsen. I have written a book about three generations of his Swedish family back in 2010 but have not written much about him on the blog.[1]

He spent his entire life as a Swedish Covenant minister, moving from city to city, as he made his way further west. I don’t really know much about him personally, and neither did his grandchildren. He died when they were very young. He left no writings either, which is unusual for a minister.

So I thought about it. Perhaps no writings were left because they were written in Swedish. All of his congregations were Swedish-Americans. He served parishes in Sheffield, Pennsylvania; Youngstown, Ohio; Cromwell, Connecticut; Harcourt, Iowa; Hilmar, California; and then several cities in California. All of these places had high populations of Swedish immigrants. He spoke Swedish to his parishioners. He probably wrote in Swedish and perhaps his children thought any of his writings, that they couldn’t read, should be tossed. Or he tossed them himself after their use.

So did Malkom ever learn to speak English? The story I heard, his children spoke Swedish at home and then had to learn English when they got to school. So the next generation purposely did not teach their children Swedish for that reason. They spoke Swedish in the home amongst themselves as a way to  speak privately without their children understanding.

In the 1900 census, the enumerator asked if he could read and write and his answer was yes.[2] However, the answer to whether he spoke English was no. He arrived in the U.S. in March of 1889. He did file his first papers for naturalization in Ohio.[3]

By 1910, he stated he could speak English. Although his services and sermons were conducted in Swedish, he also had a farm in Hilmar, California, and surely had to do business with non-Swedish speaking merchants. However, his wife, Hulda, still spoke only Swedish.[4]

Ten years later, both were recorded as speaking English.[5] A typical immigrant experience. One starts out living around other people from the same country and over time they assimilate into American society. Their children might grow up speaking the native language and learn English in school. The third generation often never learns the language and feels completely American. This is true for the Nilsen family.



[1] Lisa S. Gorrell, The Nilsen Family: From Jönköping to Amerika, (Martinez, California: Oak Park Press, 2010).
[2] 1900 U.S. census, Middlesex Co, Connecticut, pop. sched. Cromwell, ED 272, sheet 6A, line 16, Nils M. Nielsen, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), NARA T623.
[3] Mahoning, Ohio, Declaration of intention and naturalization., v. 5 1884-1887: 295, Nils Malkom Nilson; FHL microfilm 0,906,658.
[4] 1910 U.S. census, Merced Co, California, pop. sched., ED 107, sht 12 B, line 65; Nils Nilsen, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), NARA T624.
[5] 1920 U.S. census, Los Angeles Co, California, pop. sched., San Pedro, ED 312, sheet 19A, p. 252 (stamped), dwelling 563, family 266, N.M. Nilsen, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); NARA T625. 

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of March 4-17, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing: I wrote the following blog post this week:

 Webinars/Study Groups/Lectures Attended: 
  • I participated in the AmericaGen Study Group - Chapter 20 Local Land Records.
  • I attended the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society’s meeting, where we learned from Dawn Kosmakos how to make better contact with our DNA matches.
  • Monday Morning Group was small this month but we still had nice genealogy discussions.
  • I watched Blaine Bettinger’s video on “Exploring the New Tools at AncestryDNA” and learned more about the ThruLines and DNA Match list.

I volunteered at the History Center, where I trained Peggy to give the county records room spiel for the Deer Valley High School tour on Wednesday. I did my monthly Desk Duty job at the California Genealogical Society’s library.

My own work centered on processing folders of old work. I have bits of information written on binder paper. Some of it has been entered, some are FHL film numbers that are either now digitized or still as films, so I am making new lists for visiting the Oakland FHC to view the digital film or the Family History Library in Salt Lake City to view the actual microfilm. In the process, I enter information in my RootsMagic program and file the paper and digital image. Sometimes, I find something that could then become a blog post, as I did this week with the Thomas Haley estate.

I participated in two Certification Study Groups this week. A new group has formed on Thursday nights (Thursday Cert Group) with people who have been on the clock for a while and some who are getting ready to. They are looking to me for guidance. My Friday Cert Group met and we discussed lineage applications.  I mostly listened, as I have not had any experience in this subject.

For my family writing activity, I met with my sister, Sabrina for dinner at Mangi Bene, to discuss what the book should look like and her possible participation. She brought the recipe book I made for her wedding so I’d have some baby pictures for the book. We had a nice evening talking about lots of other topics, too.

Other Activities
Went bird watching with Mt. Diablo Audubon at the newly reopened Mt. View Sanitary District’s ponds. We saw about three dozen birds but the growth around the ponds is new, so not as many as expected. On the way out, I drove over a curb to avoid an oncoming truck and damaged the tire. Had to wait for a tow truck and then get a new tire.







Spent the weekend at the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society. Friday, I worked with the scenery committee cleaning the dust off of Mallard. Saturday and Sunday was an Open House & Show, and I ran trains, mostly passenger, for the crowds.


I had a bone-density scan this week. My back looks okay but there is some loss in my hips. Guess I better get to walking more!

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - A Favorite Family Photograph

It's Saturday Night,
time for more Genealogy Fun!!

For this week's mission (should you decide to accept it), I challenge you to:

1)  Show us one of your favorite photographs of your family - a group, yourself, your mom, your dad, your sibling(s), your grandparents, etc.  Tell us about it - the date, the event, the setting, the persons in the photograph.

2)  Share it on your own blog, in a comment on this blog, or on Facebook.


I have many favorite photos and hope to someday put together some family books so I can use them. In particular, I like this one photo.



I think because it has that hippie and groovy vibe. It was one of the last times we visited our cousins as a complete family. After this, we would sometimes have other activities or job responsibilities and we couldn’t always go together as a family to other cousin events.

These are my parents, Lea and Bill and their children: Lisa, Steve, Jon, Danna, Sabrina, and Renee. The occasion was the last party before our cousins moved to Oregon. Maybe in the early 1970s. I believe the image is from a slide and perhaps from my Minolta SRT 101, which I bought in 1972 with high school graduation money.


I also have a photo with our cousins in front of their front door, too.



Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Distribution of the Slaves of Thomas Haley, deceased, of Rankin County, Mississippi

My fourth great-grandfather, Thomas Haley, died 26 January 1851 in Rankin County, Mississippi. At the time of his death, his son Thomas J. Haley stated his father died without a will, and that he had over two thousand acres of land and twelve slaves.[1]

This post will discuss the distribution of the slaves, especially to Benjamin W. Jones and his wife, Amanda (Haley) Jones, my third great-grandfather. By publishing this information, descendants of these enslaved people might be able to make a connection and further their own research. These enslaved people were part of the Haley and Jones family and community, too.

Distribution
Those twelve slaves who were part of the estate were “a negro man Sam[,] a negro girl Sarah[,] a negro girl Charlotte[,] a negro boy Josephus[,] a negro girl Ally[,] a boy Sam[,] a boy Isaac[,] a boy Jordan[,] and one boy Moses and a girl Phillis and her child and a girl Celia.”[2]


In the December term 1851, Thomas J. Haley reported the heirs of the estate of Thomas Haley, deceased, were:
  • Thomas J Haley
  • William Haley
  • Benjamin W. Jones and Amanda A Jones his wife [my ancestor]
  • John H Haley
  • Mary Ann Thomas
  • Elizabeth Haley (the widow of dec’d).[3]

The share of each distribution was seventeen hundred & sixteen 66/100 dollars ($1716.66). The slaves were divided into five lots or shares. To make the shares even, it was decided that Mary Ann Thomas and John Haley pay each to William Haley the sum of $33.33, Benjamin and Amanda Jones to pay to Thomas J Haley the sum of $111.66 and Elizabeth Haley the sum of $$16.66.[4]

Exhibit A, to report:
  • To Thomas J Haley, negro boy Barnet about 26 years old valued at $700 and girl Nance and two children valued at $700.
  • To William Haley, a negro woman Maria about 25 years old valued at $800 and boy Charles 6 years old valued $400.
  • To Benjamin W. Jones and Amanda A. Jones his wife, a negro girl Violet aged about nine years valued $400 and Clarinda age six years valued $300.
  • To Mary A. Thomas a negro girl Maud about 40 years old valued $400 and Crotea about 5 years old valued at $300.
  • To John H Haley, no advancement.[5]

Exhibit B, valuation of the twelve slaves:
  • negro boy Sam                        $400
  • girl Sarah                                  650
  • girl Charlotte                            450
  • boy Josephus                            450
  • girl Olly                                     350
  • boy Sam                                    300
  • boy Isaac                                1000
  • boy Jordan                               800
  • boy Moses & Phillis & child  1700

Division of Slaves, Exhibit C
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Haley to have lot no. 1, boy Moses & Phillis & child
  • Share & lot no. 2 to Mrs. Mary Ann Thomas – negro man Sam & girl Sarah
  • Share & lot no. 3 to Jno H Haley – boy Isaac & Sam & girl Charlotte
  • Share & lot no. 4 to B. W. Jones & Amanda his wife – boy Jordan & girl Olly
  • Share & lot no. 5 to William Haley – boy Josephus[6]

 So where did the slaves from exhibit A come from? These are different slaves than the ones, administrator, Thomas J. Haley, had stated when he said there were fourteen slaves (which he named and are same names as listed in exhibits B & C) and more than two thousand acres of land.

The 1850 slave schedule for Thomas Haley listed eighteen slaves, ranging in age of 60 to 1 years old.[7] In 1851, there seem to be a total of 24 slaves.

Benjamin W. Jones’ slaves
Benjamin and his wife, Amanda, received four slaves in 1851 from the estate of her father. They were:
  • a negro girl Violet aged about nine years valued $400
  • Clarinda age six years valued $300
  • boy Jordan valued at $800
  • girl Olly valued at $350[8]

So let’s figured out what happened to the slaves of Benjamin W. Jones and his wife, Amanda. Below is an accounting of the records that have been found so far concerning Benjamin and Amanda Jones:

In 1850, before acquiring the slaves from the Haley estate, Benjamin listed two slaves in the slave schedule:
  • 1 black female, age 14
  • 1 black female, age 11[9]

In 1851, he acquired the four slaves from Thomas Haley’s estate, making his possible total at six.

There is no record for tax year 1853.[10]

In 1855, he paid tax on five slaves in 1855.[11]

The 1857 tax roll taxed only real estate and did not list any slaves.[12]

In the 1860 slave schedule, Benjamin Jones had seven slaves listed. There were also two slave houses.
  • Male Mulatto, age 28
  • Female, black, age 25
  • Female, black, age 20
  • Female, black, age 14
  • Male, black, age 5
  • Female, black, age 3
  • Male, black, age 1[13]

Now to compare this census tally with the known named slaves, one must assume that no sale or purchases happened, or there were no deaths or runaways between the two dates. The children under ten were probably born to one or two of the adult females. The two females at age 25 and 20 could be the same two from the 1850 census, or the 20 year old could be VioletCarinda, who had been 6 in 1851 could be the female that was age 14. Was Jordan the male who was 28? What about the girl, Olly?

The story from the family, Benjamin Jones enlisted in the Confederate Army and was stricken with an illness and died. His widow left Tennessee with five daughters and one son for Central Texas.[14] This bit of information has been difficult to prove. Amanda and children appear in the 1868 tax list in Hays County, Texas.[15] None of the above named enslaved people seem to appear in the neighborhood of Amanda Jones in 1870. If the family along with their slaves had gone to Tennessee, then it is possible that they were freed there by either the Union Army or by the ending of the war and perhaps they were living in Tennessee in 1870.

I hope that publishing these names will help their descendants make a connection to their pre-1870 families.



[1] Rankin Co, Mississippi, Probate Records, Petitions, v. B 1847-1855, p. 186-87, Thos Haley dec'd, Thomas J. Haley, petitioner; digital image, familysearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 24 Aug 2013); citing FHL microfilm 876965 item 4.
[2] Rankin Co, Mississippi, Probate Records, Petitions, vol B 1847-1855, p. 231-32, Thomas Haley, dec'd, Thomas J. Haley, administrator; digital image, familysearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 24 Aug 2013); FHL microfilm 876965 item 4.
[3] “The Report of Commissioners to divide Slaves,” Rankin Co, Mississippi, Probate Records, Inventories & Appraisement, 1847-1854, v. B, p. 289-90, Thomas Haley dec’d, Thomas J. Haley, admr; digital image, familysearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 24 Aug 2013); citing FHL microfilm 876962.
[4] ibid.
[5] “Exhibits A.B. & C.,” Rankin Co, Mississippi, Probate Records, Inventories & Appraisement, 1847-1854, v. B, p. 292, Thomas Haley dec’d, Thomas J. Haley, admr; digital image, familysearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 24 Aug 2013); citing FHL microfilm 876962.
[6] Ibid.
[7] 1850 US federal census, Rankin Co, Mississippi, slave schedule, p. 717 (penned), Thomas Haley, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 Mar 2019), citing NARA M432.
[8] “Exhibits A.B. & C.,” Rankin Co, Mississippi, Probate Records, Inventories & Appraisement, 1847-1854, v. B, p. 292, Thomas Haley dec’d, Thomas J. Haley, admr.
[9] 1850 US federal census, Rankin Co, Mississippi, slave schedule, p. 717 (penned), Benjamin W. Jones, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 Mar 2019), citing NARA M432.
[10] I browsed the FamilySearch catalog. There are no 1853 tax records in their collection.
[11] "Mississippi, county tax rolls, 1818-1902," digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org), Rankin County, 1855, p. 14, B.W. Jones.
[12] "Mississippi, county tax rolls, 1818-1902," digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org), Rankin County, 1857, p. 8, B.W. Jones.
[13] 1860 US federal census, Rankin Co, Mississippi, slave schedule, p. 51 (penned), Benjamin Jones, digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 Mar 2019), citing NARA M653.
[14] “Wagon Wheels keep on turnin’,” an article about O.D. Johnston of Gustine, Comanche Chief, 29 Nov 1979.
[15] "Texas County Tax Rolls, 1846-1910," familysearch.org (http://www.familysearch.org), Hays Co, 1868, Amanda Jones (image 14).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.