Saturday, July 21, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 29: Music

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Who is or was musical in our family?

My daughter, Margaret, plays the piano, sings, and dances, as well as acts. Her favorite music is show tunes. In junior high and high school, she played percussion instruments.





Her grandmother, Thelma, sang in the St. Stephen's Church choir for over fifty years. She also loved classical and opera music. She had such a strong diaphragm from singing that she could blow up air mattress in no time at all.


My father-in-law’s uncle, Fred J. Davey, was a music teacher who played trombone and led the church orchestra and the Odd Fellows band in Springfield, Missouri.





My paternal grandmother, Anna Sullivan, was in her college Glee Club. She later was a school teacher, who probably loved singing with her classes. She taught us lots of fun songs that we sang while washing dishes.

My maternal grandmother’s cousin, Erwin M Loveless, was a musician who played by ear. 

It's nice to see those in the family who had some talent.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 9-15, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Attended Gena Philibert-Ortega’s presentation at the Sacramento Public Library on Sunday about how to use Internet Archive. I have used the site before but picked up a few tips from her today such as getting a library card so I can “check out” books that are not freely downloadable.

Made more progress on my certification portfolio. I returned to the KDP to correct my numbering after reading Warren Bittner’s article in the latest NGS Quarterly, where he showed the numbering system for foreign-born ancestors. We discussed it some during our certification peer group meeting. Examples could be found in the old BCG Standards book. We all got into the classes we wanted for 2019 SLIG.

Flew to San Diego to attend the Team Leader meeting for the International German Genealogy Conference (IGGC) that the Sacramento German Genealogical Society and the German Interest Group of the San Diego Genealogical Society are putting on next June. We made some great progress.

Attended the Monday Morning group where we all shared some genealogy finds. I shared the new book, Researching Like a Pro.

Blog Writing: Blog post I wrote this week:
  • My 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about my traveling aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron on her half-way around the world trip with three friends.

Other
Outdoors activities included conducting the phenology project at Strentzel Meadow, where we saw two California Quail in the walnut tree. I brought the camera with a telephoto lens and got some shots of the birds.

For sports this week, I woke early to watch most of the matches of the Wimbledon games. Enjoyed both the women’s final and the men’s semi- and final matches. Got to see a little of the final World Cup. Also watched two Giants-A's games on television.

California Quail female

Shield bug eggs and nymphs on a Snowberry plant


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 28: Travel – Lorene’s First Leg of Trip from Tokyo

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Last week I wrote about my aunt, Lorene E. Hork Waldron, who spent a year in Japan working as a civil servant for the U.S. Army in Tokyo. She wrote many letters home to her mother, and two sisters, Virginia, and June. The family saved the letters and they were given to me in two old cloth-bound binders. One about her time in Japan, and the other about her travels west to Europe on her way home with three girlfriends, Anne Ankers, Mitzi Seale, and Donna Oehm.

The first letter was a postcard saying 
“Leaving Tokyo Aug 31. Arrive Bangkok approximately 25 Sept. Write there c/o American Express. Letter following. SIG: Lorene.”
She sailed on a freighter that loaded freight at Osaka, Kobe, Moji before leaving for Formosa, Manila, and Hong Kong, and finally arriving in Bangkok.

She wrote of the nineteen passengers on the Hermod. Besides she and her girlfriends, the only other Americans were two Presbyterian missionaries on their way to Formosa. The crew was Chinese.



One thing she wrote to her mother, 
“We all realize we’ve never had it so good and I wish so much that you [her mother] could enjoy this wonderful trip. The sea is so calm, the water such a beautiful color of blue, the sunsets are gorgeous…”
An Army news correspondent came on board just before they departed Japan to interview the four girls, who he heard were making a trip around the world. Another reporter, Robert J. Dunphy, caught up with them in Europe and an article was published in Stars and Stripes about their adventure. The start of the article began,
“Four lovely California Belles who took the wrong way home after quitting their Army jobs in Japan have bogged down here—happy but broke—on a trip that has taken them three-fourths of the way around the world. 
“Their adventures included a party with Red Chinese crewmen aboard a ship on the China Sea, a visit to an opium den in Bangkok, robbery by a monkey in India and pursuit by a cobra in Bombay. Also in hot pursuit throughout the journey was a seemingly endless army of suitors. 
“Traveling on a shoestring, the girls hitch hiked rides on desert airlines and went by slow freighter, sampan and camel to cut their costs for the three-month tour to about $700 each.”
It will be intriguing going through the letters telling of their adventures from the viewpoint of my aunt.


To be continued . . .


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of July 2-8, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Made some progress on my certification portfolio. I spent this week proofreading the KDP, first for spelling and grammar errors and then reviewing each of the citations. I added some photos to make it visually more appealing.
Five of us met in the certification peer group and shared our progress and lack of progress on our portfolios. It was nice hearing about Dennis’ class at GRIP.

At the history center, I started on a house history by first doing deed research, working my way back to find the first buyer. The client is interested in learning who built her house. I also attended the presentation of the interview with Betty, who was the first executive director of the center. It was very interesting learning how the archives all started.

I taught an Introduction to Genealogy class at the California Genealogical Society to three eager genealogists.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about three facts of my ancestor, Vincent Sievert.
And my 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks was about my independent aunt, Lorene Hork Waldron.

Other
Woke early every morning to watch tennis from Wimbledon. There has been some very exciting matches and lots of upsets. Looking forward to more this coming week.

Outdoors activities included working in the native plant garden at the Visitor’s Center and the phenology project at Strentzel Meadow. The weather has warmed up. I brought a camera with a telephoto lens and got some shots of various insects at the meadow.





Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Ahnentafel Roulette - Vincent Sievert


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1) What year was one of your great-grandparents born?  Divide this number by 100 and round the number off to a whole number. This is your "roulette number."

2) Use your pedigree charts or your family tree genealogy software program to find the person with that number in your ancestral name list (some people call it an "ahnentafel" - your software will create this - use the "Ahnentafel List" option, or similar). Who is that person, and what are his/her vital information?

3) Tell us three facts about that person in your ancestral name list with the "roulette number."

4) Write about it in a blog post on your own blog, in a Facebook status or a Google Stream post, or as a comment on this blog post.

My great-grandfather Johan Anton Hork, was born 9 November 1843. Divide by 100 gives me the round number of 18, which is Vincent Sievert. (Actually all of my great-grandparents gave me either 18 or 19).

Vincent Sievert/Siewert, was born 24 January 1823 in Schneidemuehl in Posen; died 23 January 1890 in Joliet, Will Co, Illinois.

Facts:
  • married Susanna Raduntz on 10 February 1850 in Schneidemuehl.
  • came to America aboard the ship Johanna Elise arriving in New York on 23 June 1852.
  • was a stone mason.
  • had eleven children with Susanna, ten born in Joliet.


Wished I had a photo of him.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 27: Independence


I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

I have several independent, unmarried great-aunts, two of whom I’ve already written stories. My paternal aunt, Lorene E. Hork Waldron, was also a very independent woman who married late in life. She was our “fun” aunt. She had no children, but loved to pay attention to us.

After World War II, she worked for one year in Tokyo, Japan, for the U.S. Army. We know about her activities in Japan through the letters written home to her mother, and to her two sisters, Virginia and June. She left in early March 1952.

The first letter is dated 9 March 1952 and she wrote of the first few days at sea. She claimed she “hadn’t been sick yet but had her thunder mug available just in case.” There were 2500 people on board, with twelve civil service employees, 300 women and children, and the rest military personnel and ship’s crew. She never named the ship but refer to it as the “Mighty A” which could be the USS Alabama.

She arrived Yokohama and was bused to Tokyo, where she and the other civil service employees were placed in the Osaka hotel. Many of her letters were about the many dates she had with different officers and civilian men.

Her job was as secretary and the rest of the others in the office were men who were auditors. She had to type up their reports. She became very spoiled with a personal maid who took care of her laundry, cleaning, and any other chores that were needed.

In May she felt an earthquake. “Last Thursday we had one that was a pip. I was sitting at my desk at work when it happened and was really scared! It lasted a full minute and was the worst one here in seven years. This old building really shook and the fellas in the office said my face was red as a beet!”

By June the occupation was over and she was assigned a new job. She was in charge of a typing pool consisting of Japanese girls, who typed well but had poor spelling skills. Lorene had to take care of the classified and secret work herself.

She also wrote about her disappointment in her brother, Billy (my dad) wanting to marry Lea (my mother). She felt he could do better, but didn’t write why.

Lastly, even though she went out on lots of dates, she wrote to her mother, “I guess I’m not the marrying kind. I’ll find someone over here if it’s supposed to be but I’m certainly not going to get married just to get married. Being unhappily married and a good Catholic at the same time isn’t my idea of an ideal life. This is leap year though so don’t give me up!”


To be continued…..

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of June 25-July 1, 2018

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
At the History Center, I attended the presentation on our new database program, PastPerfect, given by Scott to all of the volunteers who could attend. They have made good progress so far—the maps have been added so far. A new query came in about the history of her house in Kensington. Will work on that next Tuesday.

I contacted a previous client about permission to use the research report for the certification portfolio and she has given me permission. I have just one more element to finish. Yeah! It would be nice to finish it up and send off before our trip to England.

I attended two webinars live this week:
  • The first webinar of the new Virtual Genealogical Society: “Future Trends in the Genealogical Industry,” by Thomas MacEntee.
  • APG webinar for the upcoming Professional Management Conference “Within a 60-Mile Radius: Kansas City—The Midwest Gateway to Genealogical Resources” by Kathleen Brandt.

I participated in the DearMyrtle AmericaGen Study Group, using Val Greenwood’s new book Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy. We discussed Chapter 5 “Libraries and National Archives” and I discussed specially the resources I used when I took a research trip to Conway, Arkansas.

Blog Writing: Blog posts I wrote this week:
  • “7th Blogiversary!” It’s really hard to believe I’ve been writing for seven years. I’ve been much more active this year and I’m glad for it.
  • Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post about what happened on the day our grandmother was born. I chose my Mam-ma, Pansy Louise Lancaster, who was born November 19, 1913.

Other
Outdoor activities included:
  • pulling weeds at the John Muir National Historic Park. The Visitor's Center garden still has pretty blooming flowers.
  • conducting the weekly phenology study. Shirley and I saw a male California Quail making lots of noise which meant that his family was probably nearby. Pretty exciting, but I had the wrong camera with me.
  • working the Friends of Alhambra Creek booth at the annual Beaver Festival, this year in Susana Park

For entertainment:
  • I attended two San Francisco Giants games against the Colorado Rockies. Both nights, I sat in the Club level, where there is less wind. They won both nights!
  • Played with the Ukulele Jam group at the Senior Center


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.