Monday, August 3, 2015

Using OneNote to Create a Genealogy Toolbox

Today during the DearMyrtle "Mondays With Myrt" we got to talking about Toolboxes. I wanted to share a photo of the toolbox I made in OneNote and had a hard time figuring out a way to share. So I decided to write a blog post about it.

I got the idea from Christine Sisko Svircev at the "OneNote for Genealogy" group on Facebook. She posted a photo of how she created categories and sub-categories. It was colorful and that’s what attracted me to her post.

I had watched Thomas MacEntee talk about genealogy toolboxes either at an in-person lecture or via a webinar. Having only bookmarks in your browser is just not practical and so hard to keep organized. Plus there was no place you could annotate what this website was all about!

Enter OneNote. 

I had been using OneNote off and on. I like the Notebook set-up with Dividers and Pages. It’s how I organized my paper genealogy binders. So when I first started with OneNote in my Office 2010 program, I set up Family Notebooks with dividers for each person in the family.

This is one of my Family Notebooks. Each tab is a different person.
Each page is a different event in their life.
When I saw Christine’s version of her Toolbox, I decided to do one for myself.  I created a new Notebook. Within this Notebook I decided on some major categories which are the Dividers at the top:

·         Record Types
·         Tools
·         Nationalities
·         States
·         Laws
·         Surnames
·         Certification

These categories could be anything. To keep them organized and fun, I color coded each one by right-clicking on the tab and the last choice is “Section Color.” There are lots to choose from.

Here is one tab for Record Types with many subpages.

Now some of these categories can be further subdivided, such as Nationalities and States. 

Here is my California page under the States tab. 
At the right of the page, new pages can be added. For the States, I added one page for each state in the union. I don’t have ancestors from each state, but I might someday so I went ahead and made a page for it.


I discovered that I might want a page for a particular county and sub-pages and be made, too, as you can see with Alabama > Cherokee.  I will do the same for the countries in my Nationalities tab. 

This is a sub-page under the Alabama page. I may make sub pages for each counties in each states.
Here I put some information about when the county was created.
I hope this is helpful for you. Now my browser bookmarks list is much smaller.


Copyright © 2015 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Survey of Genealogy Activities

It's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun and Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings has a great one.

Here is my assignment:

1)  Answer these questions in my survey about your genealogy resources and usage:

a)  Which genealogy software programs for your computer do you use (e.g., Family Tree Maker, Reunion, GRAMPS, etc.)?
I use Rootsmagic as my primary genealogy program, but also have Legacy Family Tree and PAF loaded on the computer.  Sometimes I want to create a special report in Legacy. I also find details missing from some of my sources because of how PAF transferred the GEDCOM to Rootsmagic. So I have to go into the record in PAF and then copy and paste.

b)  Which online family trees have information submitted by you - in either a separate online tree (e.g., Ancestry Member Tree) or a universal (collaborative) online tree (e.g., WikiTree)?  I have no trees online except the tree uploaded to FamilyTreeDNA profile of my grandmother. I have added info to FamilySearch’s tree and I am now connected to the tree.

c)  For which subscription genealogy record providers (e.g., Ancestry) do you have a subscription?
At the present time, I am subscribed to Ancestry World, and Find My Past through the free year from being a member of NGS.

d)  Which FREE genealogy record providers (e.g., FamilySearch) do you use regularly?
I use daily the following record providers: FamilySearch, Chronicling America, USGENWEB, and occasionally use some state archive sites with record images such as Missouri.

e)  How much time do you spend each week doing actual genealogy research online?  [Note:  not reading, or social networking, but actual searching in a record provider].  Estimate an average number of hours per week. 
If working on a project, probably 4 hours per day. If working on my own family, I might work 2-3 hours per day. So for a weekly total, that would be about 14-20 hours per week.

f)  How much time do you spend each week doing actual genealogy research in a repository (e.g., library, archive, courthouse, etc.)?  Estimate an average number of hours per month over, say, a one year period.
 I volunteer at a genealogy library once a month and might do about 2 hours of research. I volunteer weekly at the local county historical society and might do 2 hours of research.  I also try to visit the FHL once or twice a year and that would be about 10 hours of research per day.  I order films from FHL several times a year, too. So my guess would be about 300 hours per year, or 6 hours per week.

g)  How much time do you spend each week adding information to your genealogy software program (either on your computer or online)?  Estimate an average number of hours per week over, say, a one month period.
 This I might do 2-3 per night while watching t.v. so say about 10 hours per week.

h)  How much time do you spend each month at a genealogical society meeting, program or event (not a seminar or conference)?  Estimate an average number of hours per month over, say, a one year period.
I am a member of three genealogy societies. I attend about 20 meetings per year for all three societies. I also a member of two society boards and spend 20 meetings per year for both, or about .75 hours per week.

i)  How much time do you spend each month on genealogy education (e.g., reading books and periodicals, attending seminars, conferences, workshops, webinars, etc.)?   Estimate an average number of hours per month over, say, a one year period. 
I attend 1 institute per year (SLIG or GRIP) so that would be about 30 hours. I might watch 2-4 webinars per month. I try to attend Mondays with Myrt, so 3 times per month. So about 75 hours per year or about 2 hours per week.

j)  How much time do you spend each week reading, writing and commenting on genealogy blogs, websites, and social media?   Estimate an average number of hours per week over, say, a one month period.
Here I probably spend too much time – but it’s hard to isolate what is genealogy base and family/friend base on Facebook an email.  Maybe 10 hours per week.

The total is about 21-25 hours per week on genealogy. This surprises me, so I may have under estimated the time in one of the above categories or my math is terrible! But I do other things: German classes, guitar class, ukulele club, volunteer work with a local creek group, reading novels, watching baseball and soccer, and doing puzzles (of course housework and sleeping and walking or bike riding and eating, etc. etc.)

2)    Answer the questions in a blog post of your own (and please drop a link as a comment in this post), in a comment to this post, or in a Google+ or Facebook post.  Here it is!

Copyright © 2015 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, July 26, 2015

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Ancestor With Most Census Entries

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has another wonderful Saturday Night assignment:

Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):
1) Do you know which of your ancestors appears the most times in the Census records? How many years? Are there duplicate entries?
2) Describe that ancestor's entries in the records in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blog post, or on Facebook or Google+.
I checked several ancestors who I know lived a long life. The best candidate turned out to be my daughter's paternal 2nd great-grandfather.

Amos Gorrell, Jr. lived from 1837-1928. He appeared in 9 census records from 1840 to 1920.

  • 1840, he was just a tick mark in the Beaver Co. Pennsylvania household of Amos Gorrell (his father) as one of the males under age 5.
  • 1850, he was 13 year old in the Jackson Co, Ohio household of Amos Gorrell (his father)
  • 1860, he was a 23 year old in the Ross Co, Ohio household of Amos Gorrell (his father)
  • 1870, he was a 33 year old head of household in Cooper Co, Missouri, with wife, Catherine, stepson, May, and children Luella, Sarah, and Joseph.
  • 1880, he was a 43 year old head of household in Cooper Co, Missouri, with wife, Catherine, stepson, May, and children Luella, Sarah, Joseph, Ada, and Arthur.
  • 1890, he would have been a 53 year old head of household in Cooper Co, Missouri; however the 1890 census did not survive. Yet, he did appear in the 1890 Veteran's Schedule, serving in the 18th Ohio Infantry volunteer.
  • 1900, he was a 63 year old head of household in Cooper Co, Missouri, with wife Catherine, and daughter Ada.
  • 1910, he was a 73 year old head of household in Cooper Co, Missouri, with wife Catherine.
  • 1920, he was a 82 year old head of household (however living alone) in Cooper Co, Missouri

His age was consistent through out his life. He was a farmer. Ancestry.com does not have agriculture schedules for Missouri, and neither does the FamilySearch Library. However, the State Historical Society of Missouri does have the agriculture schedules for Missouri. Something to put on the To-Do list!

Copyright © 2015 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.