Monday, November 25, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Nov 18-24, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 47—Soldier. I wrote about Amos Gorrell, who was a Civil War soldier and had a diary that I excerpted from.
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Thanksgiving-Genealogy Edition. We wrote about genealogy things we were thankful for.

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
  • “Shipping on the Great Lakes” by Cari Taplin. It was a very interesting webinar about ships used on the Great Lakes. Her photos and maps were wonderful.
  • I attended the Thursday evening group but not the Friday study group meeting this week.

Client Work:
No Work this week.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center this week, I opened up and continued working on special collections that need to be processed. We also had a board of director’s meeting on Thursday evening. I worked my shift at the FamilySearch Library in Oakland this week, too.

Own Work:
Monday, we finished up adding my collection of Nilsen family papers into Aunt Bernice’s collection, for future donation to the California State Archives. It dawned on me that I have a lot of digital files I never printed out, but perhaps it’s best to have only those personal papers among this collection. Digital images can be obtained by most anyone.

I met up with Jacqueline at the Walnut Creek Library for our “genealogy retreat” and spent most of the time trying to write up the blog post for Amos Gorrell. We tried a Chinese restaurant for lunch and had a fantastic eggplant dish.

I scanned papers from the Rev. Albert M. Hork file so I would have digital copies of letters and other items I had collected in my beginning genealogy research days.

I looked up some locked films at the FamilySearch Library for Eliza Gleeson family in Clinton and Plymouth Counties, Iowa. I also got the first papers for Albert M. Hork in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin records. I’m trying to record what I do and write as I go. I’m also opening up a new word doc file for each person and start writing their story as I research. This is a Thomas W. Jones trick that I would like to try.

Other:
My outdoor volunteer work involved doing Phenology at the Strentzel Meadow with Shirley, where we had a treat of seeing a Red-headed Sapsucker and a dozen Acorn Woodpeckers.  On Friday, I helped a group of people shore up the bank on the Alhambra Creek at D Street, using bio-engineering methods. We pounded stakes of willow and laid willow branches along the bank for future “rooting.” Hopefully this will keep the erosion down.


All of my weekend, from Friday through Sunday, was spent at the Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society, where we had an open house show. I spent Friday and Saturday running trains from the cabs and Sunday, I worked with Ted in set-up as a track walker, troubleshooting problems on the layout. It was fun!




Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Thanksgiving - Genealogy Edition


Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has our assignment for this week:

Here is your assignment, should you decide to accept it (you ARE reading this, so I assume that you really want to play along - cue the Mission Impossible music!):

1)  Think about the answers to these questions about your thankfulness for genealogy:
a.  Which ancestor are you most thankful for, and why?
 b.  Which author (book, periodical, website, etc.) are you most thankful for, and why?
 c.  Which historical record set (paper or website) are you most thankful for, and why?
2)  Tell us about it in a blog post of your own; in a comment to this blog post; or in a Facebook post.  Please leave a link in Comments to your own blog post or Facebook post.

Here are my answers:

a.  The ancestors I am most thankful for are my maternal grandmother, Pansy (Lancaster) Johnston (1913-2013) and my paternal aunts, Virginia (Hork) Gertridge (1925-2016) and June (Hork) Stewart (1926-2017).  All three encouraged me in my quest for the stories of our ancestors and enjoyed hearing about my finds. I wished I had started sooner and could have involved my paternal grandmother as well.[1]

June, me, Virginia (2013)

Me with Mam-ma, 2011

b.  I am most thankful for FamilySearch.org for all of the digital images made from their microfilm and later their digital cameras of records found from around the world. I am thankful for their Wiki, their videos and training, and the ability to do indexing. All of this free of charge. I am also thankful for their library in Salt Lake City, open to anyone who has the want to find the stories and records of their families.

c. I am thankful for the most useful website for U.S. research: the U.S. Federal Census. We are so fortunate in our country to have this record set, that it was saved, probably not for the purpose we use it for, but nevertheless, we have this wonderful resource that helps us find country-wide, our ancestors and their families. Many of us use Ancestry.com for the census, but it is also available free of charge at FamilySearch and Internet Archive.

How would you answer these questions?



[1] I couldn’t decide which was the best—they all helped me equally.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, November 22, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 47: Soldier – Amos Gorrell Wrote About His Daily Life as a Civil War Soldier, Part II

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

My husband’s family is very fortunate. We have typed transcriptions of the diaries his great-grandfather kept while a soldier during the Civil War.[1] At the beginning of the 1861 typed volume, Amos wrote “My Semi-occasional Journal, or Diary while a Soldier in the war of 1861. Transcribed from a penciled account which I carried with me. With some corrections. ++ A. Gorrell”  I will record some of the entries and will not correct any of the spelling shown in italics.

I have started transcribing some of the entries in a previous blog post, “Amos Gorrell, Jr., Served in the Civil War, Part I.” I shall continue the story here.

There were no surviving diaries for the period of 1863 and part of 1864. We pick up his journey in August 1864 until his discharge.

He purchased this particular book in Chattanooga, Tennessee on 9 July 1864 for 60 cents. He is still part of Co. A of the 18th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

During August he wrote about writing letters to various  people back home and about loading lumber onto boats. There was light rain most of the days with warm weather.

Aug. 1st
“Weather cloudy with heavy rain. We load one of our boats at the Timber yard on the creek, the other two drop down to the other yard on the bank of the River and load, when loaded we drop the other boat down there, also and stay over night, as it rains very hard in the evening. I go with most of the Crew to a Citizens house by the name of Fry to sleep, we sleep in a room on the floor, our clothes are all wet. Ceases to rain after dark.”[2]

Aug. 22nd
“Weather, clear and warm, most of the day. We (the boat crew) unload one boat in the A.M. At noon we have orders to get ready with ten days rations to go to Dalton to build a bridge. We get every thing ready and the order is countermanded, and we don’t go. In the evening we are ordered to get ready to march tomorrow morning with three days rations and 80 rounds of cartridges. Some of the boys of our Co (McGroff, Goff, Lane, and Bennett) have a row, and a little fight. No person hurt much. It is reported that the Rebel Cavalry have crossed the Tenn. River above here, and are committing some depradations.”[3]

So they assemble and board long trains of cars. They start at noon on the third train on the Knoxville Railroad. At Chickamauga Station they away for two more trains to be loaded with men. They run a short distance when one of their cars goes off the tracks. After getting it back on, they continue toward Knoxville, traveling through Charleston, crossing the Hiawasse River until they come to a place where the Rebels have torn up the track.[4]

Of course now they have to march.  “March 5 ms to Mousecreek Station, or Riceville. And stop and get breakfast. Then continue our march along the RR Cross into McMinn Co. pass through Athens the Co Seat, and Bivouac in the woods 4 ms from Athens. Have travailed about 20 ms. A good many of the boys give out on account of the Heat and hard marching. Some are Sun Struck. We find the RR track torn up all along our march by the Rebel Cavalry (Wheelers). It is said to be torn up for 25 or 30 ms. Athens is 20 ms from Charleston.”[5]

After all this marching, they end up going back to where they started.  He remained in camp until September 1st. They traveled by train to various places, always returning to their camp. There were skirmishes but no fighting until September 27.

“Warm and clear most of the day, a shower of rain in the evening. We get breakfast at Collumbia and start for Pulaski (co seat of Giles co) at 7 oclock. Get to Pulask at 10 Oclock AM When we get there we hear our Cavalry and the enemy fighting. Genl Rousseau is comanding our forces. He rides up to our Regt. tells us that he knows the 18th Ohio to be a fighting Regt. for he tried them at Stone River Battle. Our two Brigades are formed into line of battle on the South West side of town Our Regt is suporting Battery G of the 1st Ohio Art. Genl Rosseau informs us that it is his intention to draw our Cavalry back to Decoy the enemy, and draw them onto our Batteries Y Infantry. Our Cavalry falls back. The Enemy follows closely. But does not advance on our Position. Their line of Battle advances in plain view, a Qr of a mile off. They draw up a Battery and open on us with solid Shot & Shell at a range of about a mile. Most of their Shot & Shell goes over our head without doing us much injury. About 100 men from our Regt. are called on for to go on the skermish line. Officers call for volenteers. I am one that move of to the left. Our loss in killed & wounded is about 150. Our Regt has one man wounded. The enemy loss is supposed to be about the same as ours. We dig some Rifle pits and lay on the Battle field that night.”[6]

Over the next couple of weeks, they head toward Athens. Amos is part of the advance scouts. He writes, “Frost this morn. [Oct 14th]. We go into Athens and turn our horses over. Our co  & the 1st Vet. are complemented very highly by Genl Rousseau for our good behavior as advance guards. He tells us that we done better than any Cavalry ever he had.”[7]

They headed toward Chattanooga. and spent the next few days in camp, where he received letters from family and friends and got paid. On October 20, they got the word they would all start for home. A photographer had been there taking photos of the soldiers.

On Nov 8th, while in Columbus, Ohio, he wrote “I am in camp all day. It is presidential Election day. Polls are opened in our Regt. I vote for McLellan and Pendleton. Our election goes off peacefully.” [8]

He was still in camp awaiting his discharge orders. On the 10th his company leaves the camp for Columbus. He received $178 at discharge which included his Bounty. “I buy a suit of clothes and a trunk which costs $40. I put up at Jacob Fahrbacks (a saloon keeper) to stay all night. Pay 50 cts per meal & 25 cts for a bed.”[9]

To get home, he got a canal boat at Columbus which cost $2.50 for the passage and one meal. He arrived in Chillicothe the next morning.  “Weather cool, and cloudy most of the day with a little snow in the Evening… I got to Tony Herns tavern and get breakfast for 50 cts. go around through town a while, leave my measure for a pair of boots at Frances Aids. go to Sam Coldwells for dinner. Ride out home with T.J. Wilt in his wagon. Walk from there home. Stop and take supper at Danl Shottses. Get home about 8 o’clock. Father and mother appear glad to see me.”[10]

So the crux of his war experiences appeared to be in the diaries that are missing. It may be that they were lost sometime during the battles and hospital stay. We know he was injured badly and was in the hospital from his Civil War Pension papers. He was wounded at Chickamaouga on 20 Sep 1863 and in a hospital in Nashville, Tennessee.[11] The Athens Messenger also listed names of injured soldiers of the 18th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.[12]

There are sites that cover some of the 18th Regiments of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. I will have to peruse other materials to find out what his experiences were during the more intense fighting his unit was involved in. An example of a good synopsis of what the 18th Regiment did comes from the National Parks’ site. It covers the time period missing from his diaries. I will also be investigating other resources to find out more about his life while in service.

Stay tuned!

Example of Amos' diary, this one 1869


[1] He also kept diaries after the war into the 1870s. The whereabouts of the originals are unknown at this time. They were passed down to the grandchildren of Amos and my father-in-law received one of them. The books are very small, small enough to fit into a pocket.
[2] Amos Gorrell Diary, August to December 1864,” entry Aug 1.
[3] Ibid., entry Aug 22nd.
[4] Ibid., entry Aug 23rd.
[5] Ibid., entry Aug. 24th.
[6] Ibid., entry Sept. 27th.
[7] Ibid., entry Oct. 14th.
[8] Ibid., entry Nov. 8th.
[9] Ibid., entry Nov 10th.
[10] Ibid., entry Nov 12th.
[11] “Volunteer Service, Civil War or War with Spain,” Amos Gorrell (Prt., Co. A, 18th Regt., Ohio Infantry, Civil War), pension Invalid no. 1110444; Case Files of Approved Pension Applications, 1861-1934; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Record Group 15; Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
[12] “Lists of Casualties,” Athens Messenger, 8 Oct 1863, p. unk., col. 2, digital image, NewspaperArchive (https://newspaperarchive.com).

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 18, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Nov 11-17, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   
  • “US Military Soldier’s Homes” by Rick Sayre

I attended the Monday Morning group and spoke about finding a Davey cousin who lives in South Australia. I joined the Thursday evening group but we had no Friday study group meeting this week.

I presented at the Contra Costa County Genealogical Society about how to order military records. Then listened to Carolyn Williams present about creating a home archive. It was very good.

Client Work:
I had a query about translating German letters but referred him to some of the translators listed in Der Blumenbaum. The sample he sent was just too difficult for me to do.

Volunteer Work:
I opened up at the History Center this week and continued working on special collections that need to be processed. There are several more to do.

Own Work:
I spent all day Friday at my husband’s aunt’s house where with his cousin, we continued adding my research papers into the collection Aunt Bernice already had. These papers will be donated to the California State Archives. Will return again on Monday.

I did some research on Rev. Albert M. Hork, and also processed some of the papers I have that have not yet been scanned. These will go with me next week to the FamilySearch Library in Oakland where I will use the copier/scanner.

Other:
For exercise this week, I rode my bike to the Monday Morning meeting and to the History Center on Tuesday. I didn’t get much more except for a walk on Saturday.

I did drive to Foster City for a model railroad convention meeting, where I’m secretary. The drive was nice except for going across the San Mateo Bridge into the sun.

Lastly, Norman and I, along with his brother, Brian, and wife, Linda, rode on an excursion on the Woodland branch of the Sacramento Northern for an Amador Central fundraiser. It was a lovely ride aboard the two private cars, Two Rivers and Burrard, being pulled by a Sierra Northern Railway locomotive. The owners of the cars were very friendly. The scenery was especially nice, as we got to see parts of the Sacramento River and valley that one wouldn’t see from a car. Afterwards, we had dinner in downtown Woodland. What a great way to spend a Sunday!






Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Number One Songs

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

 It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has our assignment for today:
Tonight, we're going to go down memory lane a bit.
1)  What was the #1 song on the day you were born?  Or on your birthday when you were 15?  When you were 18?  Or when you married?  Or some other important date in your life.
2)  Go to http://www.thisdayinmusic.com/birthdayno1 and enter the date and select from UK, US or Australia record lists.  Note:  the first date available is 1 January 1946.  Alternatively, go to Wikipedia.org and search for "number one songs in yyyy" (insert your year) and enter the month and date and see a list of number one songs for each year since 1940.
3)  Tell us what your results are (If you are sensitive about your age, don't list the date or year... ) on a blog post of your own, a comment to this post, or in a Facebook status line or note.
I found the This Day In Music site the easiest to use.


  •  On my birth day, it was Doris Day’s “Sweet Love”
  • On my 15th birthday in 1969, it was: “Dizzy” by Tommy Roe
  • On my 18th birthday in 1972, it was: “A Horse With No Name” by America
  • On our wedding day, 23 August 1980, it was: “Magic” by Olivia Newton-John

None of these songs would have been on my radar and I don’t have any of them among my vinyl collection. But I did listen to music most of my life. My mother played the radio as we grew up. Once I could buy my own records, I purchased music I heard on KFRC or KYA radio, or soundtracks from movies I saw. Teenage years, I listened to Neil Diamond, John Denver, Barry Manilow, the Carpenters, and the Beatles. As an older adult, I used to listen to KFOG radio with alternative adult rock. Sadly, the station format is gone—replaced by sports talk.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 46: Poor Man – The Poor Health of Rev. Albert M. Hork

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

Although I do not have many rich people in my family, no one is really very poor either. So I settled on writing about poor health. Throughout his life, my great-granduncle, Rev. Albert M. Hork, had poor health. He died of interstitial nephritis, which is an inflammation in the kidney. The attending doctor did not know how long Albert had this condition. Contributory to this was gastritis (an inflammation of the protective lining of the stomach) and anemia. He was only fifty-eight years old.[1]

My great-grandfather, Johan Anton Hork, came to the U.S. in 1870 aboard the SS Idaho.[2] For the longest time I had thought he was the only one who came to America. However, a news article about his death in Sheridan, Wyoming in 1906, mentioned a brother in Kearney, Nebraska.[3] Over the next few years, I worked at finding this brother.

I found the Rev. Albert M. Hork in a Kearney, Nebraska directory covering 1890-91. This index indicated that he moved to Central City, Nebraska.[4]  I wrote to St. James Catholic Church in Kearney, and received a reply that Father Hork was recorded as baptizing children from September 1888 to June 1890.[5] A letter written to the current pastor of St. Michael Catholic Church in Central City, Nebraska revealed that Father Albert served there from 1890 to 1891.[6]

Next, I wrote to the Diocese of Omaha, Nebraska, asking about Rev. Albert M. Hork, and received a biography written 20 October 1902, in his own hand. He was born 10 August 1853 in Oberhundem.[7] This was the same village my great-grandfather, Johan Anton Hork was from.[8]

The biography gave his education details and where he was ordained. He then listed the places he served up to that time: Central City, Ridgeley, Randolph, Menominee, St. Libory, which are all in the Omaha Diocese.

Once I had details about his birth, it was easier to discover more about where he lived. In 1894-1898, he was pastor of St. Frances de Chantal Church in Randolph, Nebraska.[9] He served the St. Libory Church from 1899 to 1903 and he was in charge of the building of a new church after their earlier church was destroyed by fire.[10]

He was at the St. Louis parish in Gervais, Oregon from 1908 to 1910.[11] According to his obituary, he came to Oregon on account of his health. He worked at St. Louis but by 1910, his health became “so poor that it was necessary for him to retire from active service.”[12] Another obituary, found in the Catholic Sentinel, the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of Portland, stated that in the early 1870s he had ill health and left Holland for America. He worked in Brooklyn a while but “owning to the shattered condition of his health” he went on to Omaha “to recuperate and labored for a number of years, with many interruptions, on account of his extreme nervousness.”[13] It was probably his “intimate and trusted friend,” Rev. A. Hillebrand, pastor of St. John’s in Oregon City, who gave the information about his health.

Even though he had poor health throughout most of his life, he seemed to prosper well in the places he served. In St. Libory, he was responsible for the building of the new church in 1900.[14] He was listed as speaking English on census records, but also spoke German. An article in a Kearney newspaper stated he “has been doing a good work by advertising the country around Kearney in the German newspapers. As a result, has a number of inquiries from farmers, whom he will endeavor to direct to his rural parish in Prairie Center.”[15] He also served Germans at the Elm Creek location.[16]

I wish I knew more about the “nervousness” that Albert had. His nephews, Frank and Ray, both had psychological issues and Frank lived at the Montana State hospital for at least three decades. And their father, Anton, was an acute alcoholic. All I can do is use clues from records that are available.

Rev. Albert M. Hork rests peacefully in the cemetery at the Covent of the Sisters of St. Mary’s in Beaverton, Oregon.[17]



[1] Portland, Oregon, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death, Washington Co, John A. Hork, 26 May 1912. He was born Johan Albert Horoch, and used the name Albert M. Hork in the United States.
[2] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), film 336, 5 Nov 1870, SS Idaho, line 39, no. 1030, Joh Hork.
[3] "The Carbolic Route," The Sheridan (Wyoming) Enterprise, 17 Aug 1906, p 3.
[4] “Kearney, Nebraska Directory, 1890-91,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com), 1890, Rev. Albert M. Hork.
[5] Shirley Bonk, Secretary, St. James Catholic Church to Lisa S. Gorrell, 5 Jul 2001.
[6] Nelson A. Newman, pastor, St. Michael Catholic Church, Central City, Neb. to Lisa S. Gorrell, 24 Jun 2001.
[7] Rev. Michael F. Gutgsell, Moderator of the Curia/Chancellor, Archdiocese of Omaha, to Lisa S. Gorrell, Biographical Sketch of Albert Hork, 1902.
[8] Kirchenbuch, 1649-1874, Katholische Kirche Oberhundem (Kr. Olpe), Baptism, p. 139, no. 36, Johann Anton Horoch, 1843, FHL Intl 1257842, pg 139, taufen 1826-1847; Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten im Bistumsarchiv Paderborn.Kein Verleih an europische Genealogie-Forschungsstell.
[9] Carol Dowling, Secretary, Saint Jane Frances de Chantal Catholic Church to Lisa S. Gorrell, 28 Aug 2001.
[10] “Diamond Jubilee of St. Libory’s Catholic Church and Dedication of the New St. Libory Church,” booklet printed 31 May 1954, p. 29.
[11] Brenda M Howard, member St. Louis Parish, Gervais, Oregon to Lisa S. Gorrell, 13 May 2003.
[12] “Veteran Pastor is Dead,” Oregonian (Portland), 28 May 1912, p. 14.
[13] “The Late Father Hork,” Catholic Sentinel, 6 Jun 1912, p. 4.
[14] “Diamond Jubilee of St. Libory’s Catholic Church and Dedication of the New St. Libory Church,” p. 29.
[15] “Personals,” The Kearney Daily Hub, 16 Jul 1889, p. 4, digital image, Newspaper.com (https://newspaper.com).
[16] “Personals,” The Kearney Daily Hub 31 May 1890, p. 8, digital image, Newspaper.com (https://newspaper.com).
[17] I visited the cemetery in 2010 and took a photo. The birthdate is incorrect, but because the center of the stone is made of different material than the outer part, it is likely the stone was damaged in the move from the previous location of the cemetery, that was moved when the K-Mart was built.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Monday Genea-pourri, Weeks of Nov 4-10, 2019

Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week. This idea came from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing, who started this meme.

Genealogy
Blog Writing:

Webinars/Study Groups Attended:   I watched one of the VGA Seminar’s presentation:
  • The Seanachie: Linking Life and Law Through Storytelling, by Judy G Russell

There was no Thursday evening  nor Friday afternoon online study group meetings this week.

Client Work:
No client work this week.

Volunteer Work:
At the History Center this week, I continued working on special collections that need to be processed, written up as a finding aid, entering that into Past Perfect and the Online Archive of California. On Wednesday, I worked my volunteer slot at the Oakland FamilySearch Library, helping a gentleman upload an image to FamilySearch Family Tree. On Friday, I worked the Desk at the California Genealogical Society Library.

Own Work:
I scanned one of my daughter’s photo albums I had created using Creative Memories materials. I then converted each tif image to jpg to make a pdf of the whole book. I have seven more albums to do. It’s nice to be able to use these images in blog or Facebook posts. .

I also began working through some piles of items that needed to be processed, so paper and some digital. It is nice to get them entered into RootsMagic but also seems to lead to more research.

Got in a day with Jacqueline at the Walnut Creek Library this week. I spent most of the time working on the Thomas N. Davey blog post. We ate lunch at a Greek restaurant this time and my meal was delicious!

Other:
To prepare for lots of walking during our trip to NYC, I have begun doing a daily walk. I checked out the new school going up at John Muir Elementary on Saturday and walked to the mailbox. On Sunday, I went to Walnut Creek to Heather Farm Park to do some birding. Had a nice walk around with Tracy, another Audubon member. Got in some shots of birds I saw. Was hoping to see some herons, the Tropical Kingbird, and the Kingfisher, but did not see any of them. 







Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, November 9, 2019

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- A Veteran's Service and Gravesite

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

 It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has our assignment for this week:
1)  To celebrate Veterans Day, pick one of your ancestors or relatives with a military record and a gravestone. 
2)  Tell us about your ancestor's military service.
3)  Tell us about your ancestor's gravestone - where is it, what is the inscription, when were you last there?  Show us a picture of it if you have one available.
4)  Write your own blog post about this ancestor and his gravestone, or share it in a Comment to this blog post, or in a  Facebook post.
Here is mine:

I have written about my grandfather, William C. Hork, who served in the Navy during World War I on a submarine tender. Check it out here.

Today, I’d like to focus on my grandmother’s brother, John Cyril Sullivan, or as we knew him, Uncle Jack. I wrote about his early life in this post. Now that I know more about his service, I shall focus on that.

I had first found the best clue to his service from the passenger ship records on Ancestry. Originally I hadn’t found him in the lists. But then I thought about searching for him using his name “Jack” Sullivan, and there he was, Jack C. Sullivan, with next of kin his father John H. Sullivan of Anaconda, Montana.[1]


During the war, he was with the 4th Engineers in Company E. His service record was lost in the 1973 fire. So I had to discover what he did through other means. One was a book, Columbia to the Rhine: Being a Brief History of the Fourth Engineers, and Their Trip from the Columbia River, in the State of Washington, U.S.A. to the Rhine River in Germany, which told the complete story of the 4th Engineers from their formation in Vancouver, Washington to their discharge after returning home.[2] Rarely, was Company E mentioned specifically, so I wasn’t sure what they did exactly.

So off to the National Personnel Records Center, the NARA office in St. Louis, where I got the chance to look at the morning reports for Co. E of the 4th Engineers. These reports didn’t begin until they were overseas, so I have to assume that what the above book wrote about the Engineers probably pertained to Co. E, too.



I discovered from the book and the morning reports, that the 4th Engineers were responsible for cutting down concertina wire and rebuilding roads and bridges, mostly under the line of fire. I could clearly see how they traveled across France and someday I’ll make a map. Once Germany surrendered, the morning reports were typed. Perhaps the unit acquired a German typewriter.

Here is the one mentioning Sgt Jack C Sullivan
Their work seemed dangerous while traveling across France, but afterwards, they were doing mostly duty work, cleaning and repairing, unloading lumber, working in the quarry at Adenau, and such. They left Germany 19 July heading to Brest, where they boarded the USS Von Steuben for the United States.

I was hoping to find out how my great-uncle was injured, as he seemed to have a limp when I knew him. Only one paperwork said he was gassed, and only one morning report mentioned him. That was about work he was doing.[3] So I may never learn of what really happened.

Jack lived most of adult life in Southern California and is buried in the Calvary Catholic cemetery in Los Angeles. I have an image of the tombstone.[4] However, he never served in the Navy as the marker indicates. Someone must have gotten it mixed up.



I plan to someday write up his life and his journey while in France and Germany. The sources I have found plus the images I took at the World War I Museum in Kansas City and the Military Museum in Red Wing, Minnesota, will help me tell his story. 



[1] U.S., Army Transport Service, Passenger Lists, 1910-1939, database, Ancestry (http:www.ancestry.com : 19 Apr 2019), U.S.S. Steuben, 19 Jul 1919, no. 16, Jack C. Sullivan, 568973; citing NARA RG 92, Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774-1985, roll 352.
[2] Columbia to the Rhine: Being a Brief History of the Fourth Engineers, and Their Trip from the Columbia River, in the State of Washington, U.S.A. to the Rhine river in Germany, written & illustrated by the men of the Regiment, printed by Westdeutsche Grossdruckerei, GMBH, Wald Germany. It can be viewed at the Internet Archive, https://archive.org/details/columbiatorhineb00unitrich/page/n12.
[3] Morning Report, 4th Engineers, Co. E, February 11, 1919; National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, Missouri.
[4] Calvary Cemetery, 4201 Whittier Blvd, Los Angeles, California, Sec R, L634, grave 8. Photo taken by Lisa S. Gorrell, Aug 2008.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 45: Rich Man – Thomas N. Davey of Carthage, Missouri

This is my second year working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I have enjoyed writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

There are not many well-to-do ancestors in either my family nor my husband’s family. One person who could qualify would be the Thomas Nicholas Davey, who was the brother of Frederick N Davey, my husband’s great-grandfather.

Thomas N. Davey was a mine owner in Carthage, Missouri.[1] He was also a vice president of the Empire Electric Power and Supply Company.[2] He built a large Queen Anne house in 1888.[3] All of those things could qualify him as a rich man to me.

He had enough money to travel to England at least five times, in 1896, 1908, 1909, 1911, and 1921.[4]

In the 1890s, Thomas N Davey donated land at Jefferson and First Streets in Carterville, Missouri for the building of a new school due to the addition of mining land.[5]

A biography written about Thomas listed him as a manufacturer, inventor, and mine-owner. The area around Carthage had many lead mines and he managed the Carthage Machine Works, where the first Cornish force pumps were used in the mines. He spent time improving on various machines used in mining. One invention was the Cathage pump clack.  The bio stated he was “a strong and self-reliant man” and “firm in the belief that sober, frugal and diligent young men have as good opportunities for the acquisition of honors and wealth today, as at any time in the past.”[6]

I am not sure if he ever owned the mines, but I found leases for mining land. He was to pay one-third of the ore to the owner of the land. He leased the land along with two others, William McMillan and C.C. Allen.[7]

He employed Fred N Davey, who was an excellent pattern maker. He paid for the funeral and burial costs of Fred’s wife, Matilda in 1885, though no tombstone was ever erected.

He was an Episcopalian, having served as vestryman at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Jeffersonville, Indiana in 1873.[8]

He was born 7 Nov 1835 in Constantine, County of Cornwall to blacksmith, Thomas Davey and Mary Nicholas, and baptized 24 July 1836.[9] He was the first son, and third child of fifteen, though only seven lived to adulthood. The family moved from Cornwall to the Bristol area before 1841 and later lived around the London area. They departed for America aboard the Ocean Queen in 1852.[10]

The family settled first in Reading, Pennsylvania, then moved to Jeffersonville, Indiana, where Thomas’ parents passed away.

Thomas N. Davey married Anna Stealey on 25 February 1861 in Clark County, Indiana.[11] They had three children:
  • Paul Nicholas Davey
  • George Franklin Davey
  • Marie J Davey

Thomas died 20 March 1924 in Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri at the age of eighty-eight.[12] His wife, Anna, died five years later on 26 February 1929 in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas, at the home of her daughter, Marie.[13]







[1] Carthage Missouri Directory, Dunham Directory Co, Publ., 1912, p 45, Thos N Davey, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[2] ibid., 1909, p 47, Thos N Davey, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com).
[3] Image of Davey house, source unknown.
[4] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com), 1896, SS Servia, nos. 410-412, Thos N. Davey, image 792; citing NARA M237, roll 664. Also ibid, 15 Aug 1908, SS Lusitania, no. 7, Thomas N Davey, image 450; citing NARA T715, roll 1132. Also ibid 5 Sep 1909, SS Prince Fredrich Wilhelm, sht 101, lines 5 & 6, Paul N and Thos N Davey, image 608; citing NARA T715, roll 1333. Also ibid 20 Aug 1911, SS Caronia, p 1, no. 29-30, Thomas N Davey, image 466; citing NARA T715, roll 1727. Also ibid 1921, SS Adriatic, Thomas N. Davey, image 263, citing NARA NYT715_roll 3013.
[5] “History of Carterville Schools,” Jasper County Schools, http://ctv.wcr7.org/about-the-school/carterville-school-history.
[6] “Thomas N. Davey,” Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, Volume II, edited by Howard L. Conard, The Southern History Company, New York, 1901, p 232-33.
[7] Jasper County, Missouri, Deeds, v. 34, p. 253, and 381, Mining Lease; digital image, FamilySearch.
[8] “Jeffersonville,” Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY), 16 Apr 1873, p. 4.
[9] For birth, see Thomas Davey Family Bible, (Cincinnati, Ohio: Moore, Wilstch, Keyes & Company, 1859); original owned by [address for private use], transcription done by Mary Davey Korn, granddaughter of Thomas Davey. For baptism, see "England,Cornwall Parish Registers, 1538-2010," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), Cornwall >Constantine > Baptisms, 1813-1844 > image 85 of 107, p. 156, no. 1245,Thomas Nicholas Davey, 1836; Cornwall Records Office, Truro.
[10] “New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957,” Ocean Queen, arriving 12 Mar 1852, 2nd page, lines 18-25, digital image, Ancestry ((http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Aug 2019), citing NARA M237, roll 110.
[11] Clark County, Indiana, Marriages, Bk H, p 91, Davey-Stealey, 1861, FHL film 1415853.
[12] Missouri State Archives, Death Certificates, digital Images, Missouri Digital Heritage (http://www.sos.mo.gov), file no. 8087 45, Thomas Nicholas Davey, 1924.
[13] “Texas, Death Certificates 1903-1982,” digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com), Wichita, 1929, Jan-Mar, no. 12347, Mrs. Anna Stealey Davey, image 186.

Copyright © 2019 by Lisa S. Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.