Monday, April 30, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of April 23-28, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
My entire week was spent doing genealogy!

CGS Research Trip
Sunday, April 22, I left Oakland for Salt Lake City to lead a group of genealogists from the California Genealogical Society to research at the Family History Library. There were a total of fourteen of us, including me, at the library.

On our way to Wednesday's dinner at the Garden Restaurant

On the first day, where I gave a tour of the library to those who were interested. Then I was available on the third floor at the tables near the windows for consultations from anyone in the group. Sometimes I sat with a participant helping with their interpretations of a document they found or helped them navigate through the FamilySearch catalog to find the images they wanted.

Some of the participants sitting around my empty chair

It wasn’t all serious work, though. We took the time to walk to the LDS office building to have lunch in their cafeteria. I enjoy walking through Temple Square and the flowers were spectacular.

Some tulips in Temple Square 

We had three scheduled group dinners and a few impromptu dinners with smaller groups. It was lots of fun. Several people made great discoveries and new friendships.

I also got in time to do some of my own work while I waited for questions for help. I cleaned out my Download folder, by moving files to their respective folders and inputting any data needed into RootsMagic. I also viewed a few films and took lots of photos of deeds--all of the Johnson/Johnston, Phillips, Broadstreet, Person, and Hill men who owned land in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. I'm hoping that analyzing these deeds and putting them into an Excel spreadsheet will help me figure out where Samuel Johnston came from in Alabama/South Carolina. I did some Massachusetts work one day, viewing in books and online films of families of my client and was able to fill in another generation or two.

Visits With Friends
Linda and I had dinner with genealogists, Pat Richey-Erickson and her husband, Gordon, and Pam and Rick Sayre at the Red Iguana Two. The food was delicious and the conversation wonderful. We even got to do a little train watching as three Union Pacific trains went by on the adjacent tracks. Too bad my back was to them.

I also had nice conversations with Luana Wentz Darby and Warren Bittner while in the library. Warren gave me some tips about the certification process.

Blog Writing: I wrote a couple of blog posts this week:
  • The Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post was about the weather on our day of birth.
  • For this week’s 52 Ancestors post I wrote about my great-great aunt’s final resting place in a Brooklyn cemetery, which I visited.

Class/Webinars
I participated in one event this week: AmericaGen Study Group. We talked about Chapter 4 which covered evidence.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - The Weather On the Day You Were Born


Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:

1)  Have you ever wondered what the weather was like on the day you were born?  Was it a bright, sunny day, or a wet and windy dreary day?

2)  Go to the website http://weather.sumofus.org/ and follow the directions.  Put in your birth date and birthplace and find out what the weather was on that day. [Note that it only goes back to 1901.]

I was born on 26 March 1954 and according to the online report, it was sunny.


I got verification by checking out the Oakland Tribune for the weather report on 26 March 1954. I used Newspaper.com to find the issue.


I then checked if my mother noted the weather in my baby book and she had!



Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 17: Cemetery–Finding Clementine’s Final Resting Place-MTIP

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

On a recent trip to New York City to visit my youngest daughter, my husband and I took a side trip to Brooklyn via the subway to visit Holy Cross Cemetery. The walk from the subway stop wasn’t too far, perhaps 6-8 blocks.

We reached the entrance to the cemetery at 3620 Tilden Avenue and found the cemetery office nearby. The staff inside were very helpful, telling us where we would find Clementine Hork’s grave site.


 What we didn’t consider was the long walk we would have to get there. Holy Cross Cemetery is huge! It has ninety-six acres.[1]

Clementine is buried in the center of St. Michael

Clementine is buried in the St. Michael section, in row 32, plot 19. So we took off quickly for the site by foot because the cemetery would be closing in about an hour.

Now when we got to what we thought was the site, I realized that since she had no marker, I wouldn’t be able to find the spot. I called the office, asking for who she was buried next to. I was on the wrong row so the kind lady helped me get to where she was.

She is in this empty spot

Clementine was the sister of my great-grandfather, Johan Anton Hork. She was born 9 August 1851 in Oberhundem, Westfalen.[2] She came to America in 1891 with her brother, Johan Albert Hork, who was a Roman Catholic priest.[3] However, Clementine lived all alone in New York City, working as a dressmaker until she lived her final years in the Home for the Aged in Brooklyn, run by Catholic nuns, dying 5 September 1928.[4]

It’s very sad seeing no stone marking her final resting place. I’ll have to investigate how to purchase one for her so she is not forgotten.  


[1] “Holy Cross Cemetery,” http://www.ccbklyn.org/our-cemeteries/holy-cross-cemetery/.
[2] Baptism of Maria Clementina Horoch, FHL Intl 1257843, Taufen 1848-1878, pg 16, 1851.
[3] "Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1957," Philadelphia Passenger Lists, 1800-1945, manifest, S.S. Belgenland, 9 Nov 1891, Miss Cl Hork, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Dec 2010).
[4] Clementine Hork, death certificate 18531 (1928), City of New York Municipal Archives, New York City, New York.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of April 16-22, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Family
Saturday we had the memorial service for Thelma Gorrell, my husband’s mother. The service at Northminster Church in Sacramento went very well with Peggy officiating. I read some readings that Thelma picked out. Several people spoke up about memories of Thelma that made us smile and cry. At the reception, we viewed a beautiful power point tribute created by her niece, Maddy. It was a nice way to have our final good-bye.


Genealogy
Blog Writing: I wrote this week’s 52 Ancestors post about Emil Carlson’s poem about his feelings after his wife died. Also wrote a On This Day post about my parents’ 65th wedding anniversary.

Class/Webinars
I attended four webinars and discussions this week:
  • the laws of war, especially the Civil War, by Judy G. Russell
  • writing for the APG Quarterly with the APG Writers SIG by Mary Penner
  • making your case with DNA and documents by Patti Lee Hobbs
  • the Black Pro Gen Live discussion about Tennessee research

CCCHS History Center. Completed several queries and worked on some on the finding aid.

BCG Cert Discussion Group: We had no discussion this week. I have studied past research reports to see if any are suitable for the portfolio. I probably need to find a new project.

Own Family Research: I worked on my great-uncle John Cyril Sullivan. I still want to find his service record, what might still be available after the 1973 fire. I had requested before but they said there was no record. What I did this week was create a complete timeline about his life—forcing myself to review what I already knew. In the process I found he enlisted under the name Jack Cyril Sullivan. So I send a letter back asking them to check under that name. Fingers crossed.

Family History Library Trip. Sunday was the beginning of the California Genealogical Society’s trip to Salt Lake City and the Family History Library. Six of us left Oakland on Delta and arrived to warm Salt Lake City weather. We visited Harmon’s grocery store for some snacks and later everyone met at the Olive Garden for our first group dinner. It was a success. The conversations at the dinner were lively and it will be a great trip.

2018 CGS SLC Trip participants at Olive Garden
Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Lifespans of Your Third Great-Grandparents


Randy Seaver of GeneaMusing has another great Saturday Night Genealogy Fun task:

1)  We each have 32 3rd great grandparents.  How did their birth and death years vary?  How long were their lifespans? 

2)  For this week, please list your 32 third great grandparents, their birth year, their death year, and their lifespan in years.  You can do it in plain text, in a table or spreadsheet, or in a graph of some sort.

3)  Share your information about your 32 great-great grandparents with us in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blog post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a link to your information as a comment to this post.

Note:  Only list those you know about.  If you don't know many of them, do your 16 2nd great-grandparents.

I decided to do the 32 third great-grandparents of my daughter, so that my husband’s and my 16 great great-grandparents are both listed. Her paternal are in blue. Her maternal are in green.

Amos Gorrell (1804-1890), 86 years
Leah Wollam (1800-1873), 73 years

Daniel Shotts (1804-1875), 71 years
Mary Ann Bishop (1806-1896), 90 years

Thomas Davey (1807-1886), 78 years
Mary Nicholas (1811-1893), 82 years

Ludwig Wilhelm Wollenweber (1822-1873), 51 years
Philappina Margaretha Voehinger (1834-1913), 78 years

Jonas Nilsson (1839-1915), 75 years
Marta Larsdotter (1838-1907), 69 years

Anders Peter Johansson (1822-1887), 65 years
Anna Larsdotter (1831- ), unknown

Anders Eliasson Lundquist (1821-1882), 60 years
Cajsa Florine Pehrsdotter (1812-1885), 72 years

Karl Johan Ericksson (1831-1912), 81 years
Stina Maja Samuelsdotter (1837-1927),  89 years

Joseph Heinrich Horoch (1804-1857), 53 years
Maria Catharine Trösster (1813-1874), 60 years

Vincent Sievert (1823-1890), 66 years
Susanna Raduntz (1832-1911), 79 years

Jeremiah Sullivan (1811-1888), 77 years
Mary Sheehan (1822-1892), 70 years

John Gleeson (1835-1915), 80 years
Margaret Tierney (1835-1920), 85 years

Reuben Mack Johnston (1841-1924), 83 years
Olivia Jane Jones (1859-1914), 55 years

Peter Hayden Hutson (1853-1930), 76 years
Sarah Helena Selman (1858-1916), 57 years

William Carl Lancaster (1873-1946), 73 years
Martha Jane Coor (1873-1942), 69 years

A. Ebenezer Loveless (1851-1929), 77 years
Eliza A Rodgers (1854-1907), 53 years

The longest lifespan was 90 years. The shortest was 51 years. The average lifespan for 31 people was 72 years.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Friday, April 20, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 16: Storms–The Despair of Sorrow-MTIP

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

After the death of his wife, Emil Carlson wrote this poem in his autobiography:
Emil & Wilhelmina

                It is Fall.
                Storms are raging in my breast
                shadows hang before the sun
                and hides its light.
                In vain the heart seeks comfort,
                it is Fall.
                All is lost
                which gladdened me before.
                The summer’s last rose is broken
                and hidden in the world’s bosom.
                The well of happiness has dried up,
                all is lost.
                The sun has gone down,
                the shadows grow longer and longer
                I hide myself in its darkness
                and my life’s path envelopes
                til all appears dark.
                The sun has gone down.    

His wife, Wilhelmina Nilsen Carlson, died Oct 5, 1898 of typhoid fever. It was just ten days after the birth of her youngest son, Ernest.  Not only had he lost his beloved wife, he now had to care for an infant. He already had an older son, Thure, who was two.

It was in this sadness that he had to make a decision—a decision that separated the brothers for life. Wilhelmina’s brother Johan and his wife, Ida Sophia, adopted Ernest as their own. Emil returned to Sweden, where his sister raised Thure. Two years later, he received a letter outlined in black. Johan Nilsen had died.

There was only one thing Emil felt he should do: return to America and marry the widow, Ida Sophia Nilsen. They were married nearly fifty years. 

Emil lived to over one hundred. His faith was strong. He gave service to his church, Bethany Covenant Church, as a church deacon, Sunday school teacher, and serving on the building committee. 

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

On This Day - The Anniversary of William J Hork & Lela Nell Johnston, 19 April 1953

Today would have been the 65th anniversary of my parents. They were married 19 April 1953 at Queen of All Saints Catholic Church in Concord, California. The Walnut Creek Sun has a very nice story about the wedding.

Lela wore an antique taffeta dress, an ice blue picture frame hat with open crown, blue gloves, and white shantung silk shoes. Her bridesmaid was Barbara Boyenger. The best man was Bill's brother-in-law, Eugene Soares.

Family Photo on the Wedding Day - Queen of All Saints Church steps
A party with cake and punch was held at her parents' home, Tom J. and Pansy L. Johnston at 307 Nancy Lane, Pleasant Hill.

On their way for a honeymoon, Lela wore navy blue linen dress with white trim. She carried a navy blue bag and wore a white linen jacket, white gloves and navy and white spectator shoes.

Off on their honeymoon
Happy Anniversary, Mom & Dad!

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of April 9-15, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Baseball
My first game at AT&T Park to see the San Francisco Giants play the Arizona Diamondbacks. My girlfriend, Beth, and I purchased these tickets back in November and we were sitting up on the third deck—way out in left field. We always ride BART in, meeting at MacArthur station near 6 pm and then riding the Muni streetcar to the ballpark. This evening we decided to have pizza and entered the stadium at the bleachers area where I can get a gluten-free flatbread pizza. Once loaded with our dinner, we take a ride up the elevator, though this time we got off at the club level—to my surprise. Beth had something to show me. She showed something from her iPad to the guard and we entered. Low and behold, she and Brad bought season tickets and he was there with Beth’s sister, Victoria. They are very cool seats and I hope I can sit there for a game or two this season. As for this game, the Giants won in the 9th, 5-4.

Enjoying the end of a Giants' win!

Genealogy
Intermediate Class. The sixth and last class in this six-week series was about off-line research. I’m going to miss going over to the Family History Center to teach this class. This class was one of the best—everyone was so enthused and participated wholeheartedly.

CCCHS History Center. I now have staff. John G. is working on the Finding Aid with me and he will be a great addition to the team. Our board meeting was this week. One of the topics was a possible publishing project. I’m to investigate how CGS published their books.

BCG Cert Discussion Group: We had no discussion this week. I have not worked on my portfolio at all. Perhaps I’ll be able to do some work this coming week.

Blog Writing: I wrote this week’s 52 Ancestors post about taxes and Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun about the states and provinces I’ve visited.

Class/Webinars
I attended a class on California Land Records by Melinda Kashuba at the California Genealogical Library this week. It was a great class and she brought such wonderful maps for us to look at. Learning about Mexican land grants will be very useful for researching early families in Contra Costa County. I found the map below very interesting--showing all the rivers in northern California.
Map of Mining District
I also met with one of the participants who is coming on the Salt Lake City Trip. He wanted help in determining what to work on at the library. I also had a quiet day while doing Desk Duty at the library. It gave me time to work on the Mississippi tax records I’ve been working with.

German
I am taking two classes this quarter. We have a new teacher at the Acalanes Adult School and I think it will be nice to have new ideas and to listen to a new person speaking. I had to concentrate hard—she didn’t speak much English, not even when reviewing grammar!

Music
I found music for “Hallelujah” to play on the ukulele. It has both words and chords as well as music to pick. With three verses, I can play a wide variety of ways.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- My Visited States/Provinces Map

1) What states in the USA and what provinces in Canada have you visited or lived in?

2) Either list, or make a map of them (at the https://www.gasfoodnolodging.com/visitedstates/us-canada/ website) and indicate the following:

* red for states/provinces where you've not spent much time or seen very much.
* amber for states/provinces where you've at least slept and seen some sights.
* blue for states/provinces you've spent a lot of time in or seen a fair amount of.
green for states/provinces you've spent a great deal of time in on multiple visits.

3) For extra credit, you could make a map to show where your ancestors resided at any time (e.g., in 1900), or perhaps where your 16 great-great-grandparents or 32 3rd-great-grandparents married, or where your ancestors were born, all with an appropriate legend.

I have been to 46 states and 6 provinces. I made three trips across Canada (two aboard a bus and on aboard a train) and have traveled many times across the U.S. on Greyhound and Amtrak. The states in green I have visited more than once or I traveled around the state seeing sights.


Hawaii probably should have been pink or orange, as I have only visited Oahu. I need a trip to Alaska and to New England to grab the remaining states.

My extra credit map shows my daughter's great grandparent's birth locations. Pink for the maternal side and blue for the paternal.


Joseph Norman Gorrell, Missouri
Matilda Pearl Davey, Kentucky
Nils Arthur Nathaniel Nilsen, Ohio
Agnes Hilma Carolina Lundquist, Iowa
William Cyril Hork, Montana
Anna Maria Sullivan, Montana
Tom J Johnston, Texas
Pansy Louise Lancaster, Texas


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of April 2-8, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
Intermediate Class. The fifth class in this six-week series was about probate records. I created three exercises and I think they were received well. It did take about two hours, so maybe next time, I’d cut one of them out.

Webinar & Hangouts:
I attended the class, “Southern Church Records” by J. Mark Lowe, through the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research. It was four sessions over two weekends. I got a lot out of the class and some great resources. I really enjoy listening to Mark.

CCCHS History Center. I got a chance to work on the Finding Aid and made some good progress. We had no customers, so it was quiet.

BCG Cert Discussion Group: We discussed the NGS Quarterly article, “Working with Historical Evidence: Genealogical Principles and Standards,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills.[1] Her article gave us a somewhat historical timeline of how the Genealogical Proof Standard came about. Many of the footnotes had sources that look interesting to read! We'll discuss the next article in the same issue next week.

Blog Writing: I am caught up with the 52 Ancestors posts. I have completed Week 13: Homestead about my grandparents’ cabin at Boulder Creek. Week 14 is about maiden aunts and I focused on my great-great aunt, Helena Gleeson.


Vacation
I spent four days attending the Pacific Coast Region of the National Model Railroad Association’s convention in Rohnert Park. I participated in clinics, layout tours, and the banquet.
  • I learned how to take better photographs with a cell phone by touching the screen just where you want the focus to be, and with an SLR by blending photos in Photoshop.
  • I learned some tips to weather freight cars and wood structures.
  • I also got a tip on where to buy benchwork from Sievers, which is prefabricated wood parts that can be put together, plus a challenge to buy one set and get started on my own layout.
  • I visited several owner’s layouts. One represents the San Francisco waterfront and another the route between Oakland and Sacramento. One is just getting built and will be able to hand dozens of operators, and another is completely built and scenicked, that many operators run monthly.
  • I also bought a wood model of a barn and I hope to build a small diorama with it.




Next year, the convention will be in Sacramento, May 1-5. I’m looking forward to it.



[1] Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Working with Historical Evidence: Genealogical Principles and Standards,” National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 87, no. 3, September 1999, p. 165. 

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 14: Maiden Aunts

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

My aunts all married, so I have no maiden aunts, though one had no children. However, my grandmother, Anna Sullivan, had three aunts who never married: Elizabeth M. Gleeson, Helena M. Gleeson, and Margaret T. Gleeson.

One thing these sisters had in common was they were school teachers. In 1900 in Anaconda, Montana, Helen M., Elizabeth M., and Margaret Gleeson were living together at East 5th Street. Helena was the school superintendent, while her sisters were teachers.[1] City Directories give more detail: Helena M. was principal at Bryan School, located at 4th Street at the southwest corner of Washington, and Margaret was a teacher at Prescott School, located at Park Avenue at the southwest corner of Elm, in 1902.[2]

Focusing on just one of the sisters, Helena lived in Anaconda most of her adult life. She started out as school teacher and then became principal at Bryant School. The Anaconda newspaper, Anaconda Standard, had numerous articles about Helena’s working and social life.

In 1898, Helena M. Gleeson was on the Democratic ticket for the Superintendent of Schools.[3] She beat the Republican opponent, Jessie Blackstone by 1,203 votes.[4] Before she could serve as Superintendent, she had to file a $5000 bond at the office of the county clerk and recorder and L.J. Baker, W.M. Thornton, A.P. Cloutier and J.T. Quigley were her bondsmen.[5] She taught her last day of school for two years on 24 December.


She began her first day on the job on 3 January 1899, succeeding Miss Anna Quigley.[6] Her monthly salary was $125.[7] Over the years she was responsible for many things, especially the testing of teachers.

In September at the county Democratic county convention, three nominations were named for County Superintendent of Schools: Helena M. Gleeson, Mary McLaughlin, and Inez Elliott. After the first ballot, McLaughlin had 57, Elliott, 53, and Gleeson, 17. Miss McLaughlin was chosen on the second ballot.[8]  November of 1900, Mary A. McLaughlin was elected for the next term of superintendent. She resigned as principal of Bryan School and Helena applied for the vacant principal position.[9] She was elected by the school board to replace her.[10]

Besides teaching, she was a member of several clubs. One was the Literary Club. At one time she presented a paper on “The Grimm Brothers” where she “recounted the different writings of the Grimms and the effect they produced upon the people of that age. The different styles in which they wrote and the various subjects they handled formed a very interesting portion of Miss Gleeson’s paper.”[11] She was also an active singer. She performed in plays and sang at church.[12]


Helena enjoyed traveling and spent her summer breaks visiting California, Oregon and other parts of Montana.

After her retirement, she moved to Los Angeles to be near her sisters, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Mary Martha Gilbert.[13] She lived to eighty-five years old, dying 4 November 1950.[14] She is buried at Calvary Cemetery in Los Angeles.

_____________________________
[1] 1900 U.S. census, Deer Lodge County, Montana, population schedule, Anaconda City, ED 16, Sht 5, line 46, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 28 Jun 2011), citing NARA T623.
[2] Anaconda City Directory, 1902-1903, p. 148, Helena M & Margaret Gleeson, (R.L. Polk: Helena, Montana, 1902), digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[3] “Deer Lodge County Democratic Ticket,” The Anaconda Standard, 27 Oct 1898, p. 5, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[4] “Anaconda News,” The Anaconda Standard, 11 Nov 1898, p. 5, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018). Also “The Vote is Counted,” The Anaconda Standard, 19 Nov 1898, p. 5, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[5] “Miss Gleeson’s Bond,” Anaconda Standard, 4 Dec 1898, p. 5, col. 2; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[6] “New Men Will Step In,” Anaconda Standard, 3 Jan 1899, p 3, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[7] “Report of the Proceedings of the County Commissioners of Deer Lodge County, Montana,” The Anaconda Standard, 15 Mar 1899, p. 3, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[8] “Democrats of Deer Lodge in County Convention,” The Anaconda Standard, 18 Sep 1900, p. 3, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[9] “For the Bryan School,” Anaconda Standard, 21 Dec 1900, p. 4, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[10] “Miss Gleeson Chosen,” The Anaconda Standard, 29 Dec 1900, p. 4, col. 1; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[11] “Miscellany Day in the Literary Club,” The Anaconda Standard, 27 Oct 1901, p. 5, col. 3; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018).
[12] Anaconda Standard, p. 3, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 7 Apr 2018). Also “Engaged,” Anaconda Standard, p. 3, digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 8 Apr 2018).
[13] Los Angeles Directory Co's, Los Angeles City Directory (Los Angeles, California: n.p., n.d.), 1942, Eliz R Gleeson: 924.
[14] California Death Index, 1940-1997, Helen Mary Gleeson, 1950, rootsweb.com/ca/death/.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Monday Genea-pourri, Week of March 26-April 1, 2018

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing started this meme and I loved the idea. Genealogists are great at documenting our ancestors’ lives but not so great documenting our own. I’ll write about what I’ve been doing the past week.

Genealogy
Intermediate Class. The fourth class in this six-week series was about military records. The time was just right, but I need to create some kind of exercise with this class so it’s not all lecture. I worked on the next lesson about court records over the weekend. 


Webinar & Hangouts:
I listened to one webinar “Formulating a DNA Testing Plan,” by Blaine Bettinger. On Wednesday morning, I participated in the DearMyrtlestudy group working our way through Val Greenwood’s Researchers Guide to American Genealogy. Marceline and I were the moderators and except for some dead air space, I think it went well. Cheri helped out by speaking freely about the homework, too!

Oakland FHL: Volunteered again this week. I held my place at the center desk, taking care of receiving money for copies made by patrons. I got a little time working on some locked digital films for the client’s work.

CCCHS History Center. Finished up the last of the deed collection for the client and sent them to him. A DVD of all of the images will be created next week when Scott gets back from vacation.

BCG Cert Discussion Group: We met this week and everyone in the group was present. We discussed our progress with the certification process. Dennis is probably the furthest along. He hopes to be finished soon. I need a client report and will actively seek out someone to do some research gratis.

Client Work: I finished up the 5th research report for a client. Most of the resources I was using are from San Francisco. Since the 1906 earthquake and fire destroyed all the vital, court, and probate records, it was hard to put together thorough research. I had to use four different newspapers found on three different online websites. I probably put in more than ten hours (more like twenty) but still only charged him for ten.

Blog Writing: I am behind on the 52 Ancestors. If have completed Week 12: Misfortune about Martin Gleeson with a mill accident. I also got in a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post in.

Family
I celebrated my birthday quietly, first at the intermediate class, then in German Discussion class. I worked on the second piece of birthday cake over four days. It was so rich that just a few bites at a time were perfect!

My daughter, Elizabeth, came down for a birthday dinner at Kobe in Pleasant Hill where we had the hibachi grill. We all ordered seafood: Elizabeth and I had prawns and scallops while Norman had lobster and scallops. It was very tasty!

On one of the walks this week, I took some photos of spring blooming flowers. These give me a great smile to see bulbs blooming. My own California Poppies are starting to bloom, too.



Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – Week 12: Misfortune: Martin Gleeson’s Accident

I am working on this year-long prompt, hosted by Amy Johnson Crow. I will write each week in one of my two blogs, either Mam-ma’s Southern Family or at My Trails Into the Past. I’m looking forward to writing about my children’s ancestors in new and exciting ways.

The Bend Bulletin, 18 August 1924
Martin Gleeson had an accident while working at the Brooks-Scanlon planing mill in Bend, Oregon. According to the Bend Bulletin:

The injury of July 24 came when a board going through the planer split, and a large jagged splinter was thrust into Gleeson's hip. Infection lowered his vitality and he was in no condition to make a successful fight against pneumonia, contracted later.[1]

The death certificate gave the cause of death as “myocardial degeneration, contributed by infected wound buttock” and the doctor also stated an operation on 28 July 1924 had preceded death.[2]

The injury at the mill was on July 24 and his death was 18 August. 

Another obituary, in the Mitchell Evening Republican, stated additional information about the injury, calling him a victim of blood poisoning:

According to letters received by John Gleeson last week, his brother was injured when a band saw in the mill broke. A splinter was deep into Mr. Gleeson's hip and poisoning resulted.[3]

Martin Gleeson was 65 years old at the time of his death.[4] He married Hanna Kane in 1893 and she died in Mitchell on 3 Feb 1917.[5] They were the parents of three children: Marguerite, Florence, and Frederick. He had been a farmer in Mitchell, South Dakota, before moving to Bend, Oregon.  Funeral was held at St. Francis Church and he was buried in Pilot Butte Cemetery.[6]

It was over three weeks between the injury and his death. There must have been great pain to his hip area during that period. Today with antibiotics, he might have survived the injury.



[1] "Fatal Complication Sequel to Injuries," The Bend Bulletin, 18 August 1924, Martin Gleeson.
[2] Oregon State Board of Health, Certificate of Death, Deschutes Co, 1924, Martin Gleeson.
[3] "Martin Gleeson, Pioneer of City, Poison Victim," Mitchell Evening Republican, 19 August 1924, Martin Gleeson obituary; Newspaper Archive (http://access.newspaperarchive.com/ : accessed 15 June 2016).
[4] St. Philips Church, Richmond, Carleton Co, B2, Feb 1859, Martin Gleeson "Ontario, Canada, Parish registers, 1836-1917," digital images, FamilySearch  (http://familysearch.org), film 1304679.
[5] "Mrs. Gleeson Called Beyond ,” Mitchell Daily Republican, Sat, Feb 3, 1917, pg 5.
[6] "Fatal Complication Sequel to Injuries," The Bend Bulletin, 18 August 1924, Martin Gleeson.

Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Which Ancestors Were Born on This Date?


Randy Seaver of Genea-Musing has a new mission for us:

1) Which of your ancestors were born on this day, 31 March? How can you find out? Tell us how you did it.

2) If you don't have an ancestor born on this date, then select another date in March and list those.

3) Share your findings in your own blog post, or in comments on this blog post, on Facebook or Google+.


I have no direct ancestors with a 31 March birthdate, but there were quite a few people in my RootsMagic database who were born on this date. I left off those who are still alive.

My Husband's Line

Elizabeth Bishop was born in 1769 to Heinrich Bischof and Catherine Schreyer and the sister to  Norman's direct ancestor, Frederick Bishop. She was likely born in Pennsylvania or Maryland. She was his third great grandaunt.

Carolina Samuelsdotter was born in 1826 in Tidersrum, Östergötland län, Sweden to Samuel Persson and Maja Stina Jonasdotter. She was the sister of Norman's third great grandaunt, Stina Maja Samuelsdotter. Stina Maja's daughter, Matilda came to the U.S. and married Per Alfred Lundquist.

Isaac Newton Gorrell was born in 1833 in Pennsylvania to Jesse Gorrell and Sophia May Forney. He was Norman's first cousin 3 times removed.

My line:

Sallie Eugenia Mathis was born in 1860 to John Wesley Mathis and Laura M. Kethley. She was my third cousin 3 times removed.

Loretta Louise Tierney was born in 1883 in Carleton County, Ontario, Canada to John Tierney and Mary Ann Burrows. She was my second cousin 3 times removed.

Louisa Germaine Sievert was born in 1885 in Joliet, Will County, Illinois to Augustus Sievert and Martha Streich. She was my second cousin 2 times removed.


Copyright © 2018 by Lisa Suzanne Gorrell, My Trails into the Past. All Rights Reserved.